Results for 'Agar'

16 found
Order:
  1. Life in Overabundance: Agar on Life-Extension and the Fear of Death.Aveek Bhattacharya & Robert Mark Simpson - 2014 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (2):223-236.
    In Humanity’s End: Why We Should Reject Radical Enhancement, Nicholas Agar presents a novel argument against the prospect of radical life-extension. Agar’s argument hinges on the claim that extended lifespans will result in people’s lives being dominated by the fear of death. Here we examine this claim and the surrounding issues in Agar’s discussion. We argue, firstly, that Agar’s view rests on empirically dubious assumptions about human rationality and attitudes to risk, and secondly, that even if (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. The Harms of Status Enhancement Could Be Compensated or Outweighed: A Response to Agar.Thomas Douglas - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (2):75-76.
    Nicholas Agar argues, that enhancement technologies could be used to create post-persons—beings of higher moral status than ordinary persons—and that it would be wrong to create such beings.1 I am sympathetic to the first claim. However, I wish to take issue with the second.Agar's second claim is grounded on the prediction that the creation of post-persons would, with at least moderate probability, harm those who remain mere persons. The harm that Agar has in mind here is a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  3. Can ‘Eugenics’ Be Defended?Francesca Minerva, Diana S. Fleischman, Peter Singer, Nicholas Agar, Jonathan Anomaly & Walter Veit - 2021 - Monash Bioethics Review 39 (1):60-67.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Designing Babies: Morally Permissible Ways to Modify the Human Genome1.Nicholas Agar - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (1):1-15.
    My focus in this paper is the question of the moral acceptability of attempts to modify the human genome. Much of the debate in this area has revolved around the distinction between supposedly therapeutic modification on the one hand, and eugenic modification on the other. In the first part of the paper I reject some recent arguments against genetic engineering. In the second part I seek to distinguish between permissible and impermissible forms of intervention in such a way that does (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  5.  38
    Jon Agar, Science and Spectacle: The Work of Jodrell Bank in Post War British Culture. [REVIEW]Sean F. Johnston - 1999 - Science and Public Policy 26:215-216.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Eugenesia Liberal.Nicholas Agar - 2012 - Signos Filosóficos 14 (28):145-170.
    El artículo ofrece una interpretación de la controversial y aparentemente inaceptable caracterización de la poesía desarrollada por Platón en la República. Los objetivos principales de la discusión son: aclarar las motivaciones de dicha caracterización, desentrañar los múltiples y discontinuos argumentos que la componen, y evaluar críticamente sus aciertos y sus límites. Se concluye que no todas las posturas que adopta Platón frente a la poesía son insostenibles, y que cuando sí lo son las razones para ello resultan particularmente esclarecedoras. The (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Radical Enhancement as a Moral Status de-Enhancer.Jesse Gray - 2020 - Monash Bioethics Review 1 (2):146-165.
    Nicholas Agar, Jeff McMahan and Allen Buchanan have all expressed concerns about enhancing humans far outside the species-typical range. They argue radically enhanced beings will be entitled to greater and more beneficial treatment through an enhanced moral status, or a stronger claim to basic rights. I challenge these claims by first arguing that emerging technologies will likely give the enhanced direct control over their mental states. The lack of control we currently exhibit over our mental lives greatly contributes to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8.  70
    Enhancement and the Conservative Bias.Ben Davies - 2017 - Philosophy and Technology 30 (3):339-356.
    Nicholas Agar argues that we should avoid certain ‘radical’ enhancement technologies. One reason for this is that they will alienate us from current sources of value by altering our evaluative outlooks. We should avoid this, even if enhancing will provide us with novel, objectively better sources of value. After noting the parallel between Agar’s views and G. A. Cohen’s work on the ‘conservative bias’, I explore Agar’s suggestion in relation to two kinds of radical enhancement: cognitive and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Will Cognitive Enhancement Create Post‐Persons? The Use(Lesness) of Induction in Determining the Likelihood of Moral Status Enhancement.Emilian Mihailov & Alexandru Dragomir - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):308-313.
    The prospect of cognitive enhancement well beyond current human capacities raises worries that the fundamental equality in moral status of human beings could be undermined. Cognitive enhancement might create beings with moral status higher than persons. Yet, there is an expressibility problem of spelling out what the higher threshold in cognitive capacity would be like. Nicholas Agar has put forward the bold claim that we can show by means of inductive reasoning that indefinite cognitive enhancement will probably mark a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  10. Pharmacological Cognitive Enhancement and Cheapened Achievement: A New Dilemma.Emma C. Gordon & Lucy Dunn - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-13.
    Abstract. Recent discussions of cognitive enhancement often note that drugs and technologies that improve cognitive performance may do so at the risk of “cheapening” our resulting cognitive achievements (e.g., Kass 2004; Agar 2010; Sandel 2012; 2007; Harris 2011). While there are several possible responses to this worry, we will highlight what we take to be one of the most promising—one which draws on a recent strand of thinking in social and virtue epistemology to construct an integrationist defence of cognitive (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11.  25
    Emergence of Ciprofloxacin Resistance Among Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Isolated From Burn Patients [Hplimg].M. R. Shakibaie, S. Adeli & Y. Nikian - 2001 - Emergence: Complexity and Organization 26 (3&4).
    Background: Increasing resistance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to ciprofloxacin in ICU/burn units has created a problem in the treatment of infections caused by this microorganism. -/- Methods: Fifty P. aeruginosa strains were isolated from burn patients hospitalized in the Kerman Hospital during May 1999-April 2000 and were tested for in-vitro sensitivity to different antibiotics by disc diffusion breakpoint assay. The isolates were subjected to minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) test by agar dilution method. Existence of the plasmids was also investigated in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Evaluation Synergistic Effect of TiO2, ZnO Nanoparticles and Amphiphilic Peptides (Mastoparan-B, Indolicidin) Against Drug-Resistant Pseudomonas Aeruginosa, Klebsiella Pneumoniae and Acinetobacter Baumannii.Shalaleh Masoumi & Mohammad Reza Shakibaie - 2018 - Archives of Pediatric Infectious Diseases 6 (3):1-8.
    Backgound: The aims of this study were to evaluate the antimicrobial properties and synergistic effects of nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2), nano- zinc oxide (ZnO) and two synthetic peptides (mastoparan-B, indolicidin) against drug-resistant strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Acinetobacter baumannii. -/- Methods: From March to August 2015, a total of 30 (10 each) isolates of the above bacteria were recovered from patients in the ICU of two referral hospitals in Kerman, Iran. The sizes and purities of nano-TiO2, nano-ZnO were determined (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Is Moral Bioenhancement Dangerous?Nicholas Drake - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):3-6.
    In a recent response to Persson & Savulescu’s Unfit for the Future, Nicholas Agar argues that moral bioenhancement is dangerous. His grounds for this are that normal moral judgement should be privileged because it involves a balance of moral subcapacities; moral bioenhancement, Agar argues, involves the enhancement of only particular moral subcapacities, and thus upsets the balance inherent in normal moral judgement. Mistaken moral judgements, he says, are likely to result. I argue that Agar’s argument fails for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Eugenics Offended.Robert A. Wilson - forthcoming - Monash Bioethics Review.
    This commentary continues an exchange on eugenics in Monash Bioethics Review between Anomaly (2018), Wilson (2019), and Veit, Anomaly, Agar, Singer, Fleischman, and Minerva (2021). The eponymous question, “Can ‘Eugenics’ be Defended?”, is multiply ambiguous and does not receive a clear answer from Veit et al.. Despite their stated desire to move beyond mere semantics to matters of substance, Veit et al. concentrate on several uses of the term “eugenics” that pull in opposite directions. I argue, first, that Veit (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15.  65
    The Fantasy of Mind-Uploading. Defaults and the Ends of Junk.Adrian Mróz - 2021 - Kultura I Historia 39 (1).
    From a behaviorist perspective, the desire to upload “minds” is already being realized on a mass, hyper-industrial scale thanks to the convergence of cognitive computing and Big Data. The accusation is that the “mind” is not an entity that exists intracranially. Instead, it is conceived as a process of individuation, which occurs in different modes and numbers. Some narratives of mind-uploading and technics in popular culture are explored: Transcendence (2014, dir. Wally Pfister) and Player Piano by Kurt Vonnegut. The discussed (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16.  15
    A Thought Experiment in Life Prolongation: The Tortoise Transformation.Timothy F. Murphy - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 12:645–649.
    The value of extending the human lifespan remains a key philosophical debate in bioethics. In building a case against the extension of the species-typical human life, Nicolas Agar considers the prospect of transforming human beings near the end of their lives into Galapagos tortoises, which would then live on decades longer. A central question at stake in this transformation is the persistence of human consciousness as a condition of the value of the transformation. Agar entertains the idea that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark