View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

122 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 122
Material to categorize
  1. Barbaric, Unseen, and Unknown Orders: Innovative Research on Street and Farmers' Markets.Alexander V. Stehn - 2019 - The Pluralist 14 (1):47.
    Professor Morales’ Coss Dialogue Lecture demonstrates the utility of pragmatism for his work as a social scientist across three projects: 1) field research studying the acephalous and heterogenous social order of Chicago’s Maxwell Street Market; 2) nascent research how unseen religious orders animate the lives of im/migrants and their contributions to food systems; and 3) large-scale longitudinal research on farmers markets using the Metrics + Indicators for Impact (MIFI) toolkit. The first two sections of my paper applaud and build upon (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Hegel and the Ethics of Brandom’s Metaphysics.Jonathan Lewis - 2018 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 10 (2):1-21.
    In order to develop his pragmatist and inferentialist framework, Robert Brandom appropriates, reconstructs and revises key themes in German Idealism such as the self-legislation of norms, the social institution of concepts and facts, a norm-oriented account of being and the critique of representationalist accounts of meaning and truth. However, these themes have an essential ethical dimension, one that Brandom has not explicitly acknowledged. For Hegel, the determination of norms and facts and the institution of normative statuses take place in the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. How Artistic Creativity is Possible for Cultural Agents.Aili Bresnahan - 2015 - In Nordic Studies in Pragmatism. Helsinki, Finland: pp. 197-216.
    Joseph Margolis holds that both artworks and selves are ”culturally emergent entities." Culturally emergent entities are distinct from and not reducible to natural or physical entities. Artworks are thus not reducible to their physical media; a painting is thus not paint on canvas and music is not sound. In a similar vein, selves or persons are not reducible to biology, and thought is not reducible to the physical brain. Both artworks and selves thus have two ongoing and inseparable ”evolutions”—one cultural (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Pragmatism, Perspectivism, Anthropology. A Consistent Triad.Pietro Gori - 2017 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Philosophische Anthropologie 7 (1):83-102.
    The paper defends the idea that Jamesian pragmatism, Nietzschean perspectivism, and philosophical anthropology represent a consistent triad, for the similarities and connections between the first two positions rest in their engagement with the anthropological question. As will be argued, a) pragmatism is concerned with anthropology and that it deals with a fundamental issue of Nietzsche’s late thought; b) the problem of the type of man (der Typus Mensch) is involved in Nietzsche’s questioning the value of truth, and perspectivism is an (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Ethical Pragmatism.Raff Donelson - 2017 - Metaphilosophy 48 (4):383-403.
    Beginning with a thought experiment about a mysterious Delphic oracle, this article motivates, explains, and attempts to defend a view it calls Ethical Pragmatism. Ethical Pragmatism is the view that we can and should carry on our practice of moral deliberation without reference to moral truths, or more broadly, without reference to metaethics. The defense the article mounts tries to show that neither suspicions about the tenability of fact-value distinctions, nor doubts about the viability of global pragmatism, nor worries about (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Rascals, Triflers, and Pragmatists: Developing a Peircean Account of Assertion.Kenneth Boyd & Diana Heney - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):1-22.
    While the topic of assertion has recently received a fresh wave of interest from Peirce scholars, to this point no systematic account of Peirce’s view of assertion has been attempted. We think that this is a lacuna that ought to be filled. Doing so will help make better sense of Peirce’s pragmatism; further, what is hidden amongst various fragments is a robust pragmatist theory of assertion with unique characteristics that may have significant contemporary value. Here we aim to uncover this (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  7. The Reception of Peirce in Spain and the Spanish Speaking Countries.Sara Barrena & Jaime Nubiola - 2014 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 6 (1).
    A surprising fact about the Hispanic philosophical historiography2 of the 20th century is its almost complete ignorance of the American philosophical tradition. This disconnect is even more surprising when one takes into account the striking affinities between the topics and problems treated by the most relevant Hispanic thinkers (Unamuno, Ortega, Vaz Ferreira, Ferrater Mora, Xirau) and the central questions raised in the most important native current of American thought in the late 19th and 20th centuries, pragmatism. In recent years there (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Between Critical and Normative Theory.Samuel Bagg - 2016 - Political Research Quarterly 69:1-12.
    Over the last decade, a call for greater “realism” in political theory has challenged the goals and methods that are implicit in much contemporary “normative” theory. However, realists have yet to produce a convincing alternative research program that is “constructive” rather than primarily “critical” in nature. I argue that given their common wariness of a devotion to abstract principles, realists should consider adopting John Dewey’s vision of theoretical expertise as an expansive kind of prediction that engages all of our historical, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Book Review: Judith Green. Deep Democracy: Community, Diversity, Transformation. Lanham, Md: Rowman and Littlefield, 1999. [REVIEW]Lisa Heldke - 2004 - Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 19 (2):177-180.
    Deep Democracy draws upon the insights of American thinkers whose work has received less attention than the "holy trinity" of Peierce, James and Dewey, in order to investigate current philosophical problems and questions. The work does carry out a sustained interaction with the work of Dewey, in the course of exploring the nature of, obstacles to, and prospects for strengthening the fabric of democracy in the contemporary world. But Green also puts Dewey in conversation with Jane Addams, Alain Locke, Martin (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Review of Santayana the Philosopher: Philosophy as a Form of Life, by Daniel Moreno. [REVIEW]Martin A. Coleman - 2015 - Overheard in Seville 33 (33):72-75.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Morris Grossman on Santayana.Martin A. Coleman - 2014 - Overheard in Seville 32 (32):11-18.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. A Kantian Responds to Santayana.Samuel J. M. Kahn - 2015 - SOCRATES 3 (1):66-79.
    In this paper, I have argued that whatever might be said about his attack on other German philosophers, Santayana’s attack on Kant, despite its subtlety, its force and its intelligence, is fundamentally misguided. Teasing out where Santayana’s attack rests on misunderstandings of Kant’s philosophy is a useful exercise: it is useful for Kantians, for it gives us a chance to show Kant at his best; it is useful for Santayana scholars, for it reminds us that Santayana, for all his brilliance, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Pragmatist Historiography in Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy.Phillip Deen - 2013 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 5 (1).
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Logic, Ethics and Aesthetics: Some Consequences of Kant’s Critiques in Peirce’s Early Pragmatism.Vitaly Kiryushchenko - 2011 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 3 (2):258-274.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The American Pragmatists. [REVIEW]Tom Donaldson - 2014 - Philosophical Review 123 (3):355-359.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Realism, Science, and Pragmatism.Kenneth R. Westphal (ed.) - 2014 - Routledge.
    This collection of original essays aims to reinvigorate the debate surrounding philosophical realism in relation to philosophy of science, pragmatism, epistemology, and theory of perception. Questions concerning realism are as current and as ancient as philosophy itself; this volume explores relations between different positions designated as ‘realism’ by examining specific cases in point, drawn from a broad range of systematic problems and historical views, from ancient Greek philosophy through the present. The first section examines the context of the project; contributions (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. A Call for Inclusion in the Pragmatic Justification of Democracy.Phillip Deen - 2009 - Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (1):131-151.
    Despite accepting Robert Talisse's pluralist critique of models of democratic legitimacy that rely on substantive images of the common good, there is insufficient reason to dismiss Dewey's thought from future attempts at a pragmatist philosophy of democracy. First, Dewey's use of substantive arguments does not prevent him from also making epistemic arguments that proceed from the general conditions of inquiry. Second, Dewey's account of the mean-ends transaction shows that ends-in-view are developed from within the process of democratic inquiry, not imposed (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18. Care Crosses the River (Review).S. Joshua Thomas - 2012 - The Pluralist 7 (2):113-118.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Through the Eyes of Mad Men: Simulation, Interaction, and Ethics.Mitchell Aboulafia - 2011 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy (2):133-147.
    Traditionally pragmatists have been favorably disposed to improving our understanding of agency and ethics through the use of empirical research. In the last two decades simulation theory has been championed in certain cognitive science circles as a way of explaining how we attribute mental states and predict human behavior. Drawing on research in psychology and neuroscience, Alvin I. Goldman and Robert M. Gordon have not only used simulation theory to discuss how we “mindread”, but have suggested that the theory has (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Cavell's 'Moral Perfectionism' or Emerson's 'Moral Sentiment'?Joseph Urbas - 2010 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 2 (2):41-53.
    What is properly Emersonian about moral perfectionism? Perhaps the best answer is: not much. Stanley Cavell's signature concept, which claims close kinship to Emerson's ethical philosophy, seems upon careful examination to be rather far removed from it. Once we get past the broad, unproblematic appeals to Emerson's “unattained but attainable self,” and consider the specific content and implications of perfectionism, the differences between the two thinkers become too substantive – and too fraught with serious misunderstandings – to be ignored. It (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Pragmatism and the Social Sciences: A Century of Influences and Interactions.Roberto Frega & Filipe Carreira da Silva - 2011 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 3 (2):1-6.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Embodied Animal Mind and Hand-Signing Chimpanzees. Booth - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (3):25-33.
    Chimpanzee language studies have generated much heated controversy, as Roger Fouts can attest from firsthand experience. Perhaps this is because language is usually considered to be what truly distinguishes humans from apes. If chimps can indeed be taught the rudiments of language, then the difference between them and us is not as great as we might have thought. It is a matter of degree rather than kind, a continuity, and our species is not so special after all. The advantage of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Not Alone on the Third Plateau. Fesmire - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (3):44-49.
    It is of course essential to disclose passively accepted beliefs that inhabit and shape the roots and edges of American philosophy if the scope of our tradition is to continue to evolve to meet situations that seldom fit neatly into inherited categories. Our dialogue with Roger Fouts is an occasion for supplementing and correcting uncritical perpetuation of narrowly (vs. broadly) humanistic intellectual habits. His lecture is also an occasion for confronting complex issues of how best to comport ourselves toward other (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. El Pueblo and Its Problems: Democracy of, by, and for Whom?Alexander Stehn - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (3):103-116.
    In response to those calling for philosophical dialogue across the Americas, this paper considers the historical emergence of the concept of el pueblo (“the people”) as the subject and object of democracy. The first section makes a linguistic claim: the genuinely communal nature of “the people” clearly appears when considering el pueblo because it is unambiguously singular, grammatically speaking. The second section makes a historical claim: the microhistory of a largely indigenous pueblo in Mexico’s Yucatán enables us to begin unpacking (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  25. Pragmatism, Trascendentalism, and Perfectionism.Roberto Frega, Donatelli Piergiorgio & Laugier Sandra - 2010 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 2 (2):iv-xiii.
    Introduction to the symposia on Pragmatism and Perfectionism appered on the European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy, vol. 2 issue 2, 2010.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Sophism and Moral Agnosticism, or, How to Tell a Relativist From a Pluralist. Torcello - 2011 - The Pluralist 6 (1):87-108.
    Is it possible to recognize the limits of rationality, and thus to embrace moral pluralism, without embracing moral relativism? My answer is yes; nevertheless, certain anti-foundational positions, both recent and ancient, take a cynical stance toward the possibility of any critical moral judgment, and as such, must be regarded as relativistic.1 It is such cynicism, I argue, whether openly announced or unknowingly implied, that marks the distinction between relativism and pluralism.2 The danger of this cynicism is not so much that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
19th Century American Pragmatism, Misc
  1. Misak's Peirce and Pragmatism's Metaphysical Commitments.Andrew Howat - 2018 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 54 (3):378.
    In this comment on Misak’s Cambridge Pragmatism, I examine a case study—debate about the existence of free will—in order to explore residual tensions between Misak’s ‘truth-affirming,’ Peircean pragmatism, and mainstream analytic philosophy. I suggest that Misak’s Peirce makes a metaphysical commitment to the existence of rational self-control, and thereby to the existence of free will. I also suggest, however, that her ‘analytic pragmatism’ thus far offers few clues about how we should defend such a commitment from skeptical arguments emerging from (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Taking God Seriously, but Not Too Seriously: The Divine Command Theory and William James' 'The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life’.Mark J. Boone - 2013 - William James Studies 10:1-20.
    While some scholars neglect the theological component to William James’s ethical views in “The Moral Philosopher and the Moral Life,” Michael Cantrell reads it as promoting a divine command theory (DCT) of the foundations of moral obligation. While Cantrell’s interpretation is to be commended for taking God seriously, he goes a little too far in the right direction. Although James’s view amounts to what could be called (and what Cantrell does call) a DCT because on it God’s demands are necessary (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. A New Peircean Response to Radical Skepticism.Justin Remhof - 2018 - Contemporary Pragmatism 15 (1):15-22.
    The radical skeptic argues that I have no knowledge of things I ordinarily claim to know because I have no evidence for or against the possibility of being systematically fed illusions. Recent years have seen a surge of interest in pragmatic responses to skepticism inspired by C. S. Peirce. This essay challenges one such influential response and presents a better Peircean way to refute the skeptic. The account I develop holds that although I do not know whether the skeptical hypothesis (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Peirce on Intuition, Instinct, and Common Sense.Kenneth Boyd & Diana Heney - 2017 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy (2).
    In addition to being a founder of American pragmatism, Charles Sanders Peirce was a scientist and an empiricist. A core aspect of his thoroughgoing empiricism was a mindset that treats all attitudes as revisable. His fallibilism seems to require us to constantly seek out new information, and to not be content holding any beliefs uncritically. At the same time, Peirce often states that common sense has an important role to play in both scientific and vital inquiry, and that there cannot (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. In Defense of Wishful Thinking: James, Quine, Emotions, and the Web of Belief.Alexander Klein - 2018 - In Maria Baghramian & Sarin Marchetti (eds.), Pragmatism and the European Traditions: Encounters with Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology Before the Great Divide. London: Routledge. pp. 228-250.
    What is W. V. O. Quine’s relationship to classical pragmatism? Although he resists the comparison to William James in particular, commentators have seen an affinity between his “web of belief” model of theory confirmation and James’s claim that our beliefs form a “stock” that faces new experience as a corporate body. I argue that the similarity is only superficial. James thinks our web of beliefs should be responsive not just to perceptual but also to emotional experiences in some cases; Quine (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Visualizando Signos.Joao Queiroz & Priscila Farias - 2017 - Sao Paulo: Blucher.
    Os signos e as classes dos signos estão entre os tópicos mais importantes do sistema filosófico de Charles S. Peirce. As 10, 28, e 66 classes de signos são classificações desenvolvidas especialmente a partir de 1903 e representam um grande refinamento da divisão fundamental de signos – ícone, índice, símbolo. Nossa abordagem aqui define uma estratégia de visualização das classificações dos signos, com especial atenção para as 10 e 66 classes de signos. O livro está dividido em duas partes: (i) (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Hypotheses, Generalizations, and Convergence: Some Peircean Themes in the Study of History.Serge Grigoriev - 2017 - History and Theory 56 (3):339-361.
    This essay examines the relationship between some key elements of Peirce’s general theory of scientific inquiry (such as final causality, real possibility, methodological convergence, abductive reasoning, hypothesis formation, diagrammatic idealization) and some prominent issues discussed in the current philosophy of history, especially those pertaining to the role of generalizations in historical explanation. The claim is that, appropriately construed, Peirce’s recommendations with respect to rational inquiry in general can provide a reasonable basis for formulating a productive critical method for a responsible (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Review of Practicing Philosophy as Experiencing Life. [REVIEW]Raff Donelson - 2016 - Contemporary Pragmatism 13 (4):445-448.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Peirce on Person: Peirce’s Theory of Determination and the Existence of Personality.Cheongho Lee - 2016 - Appraisal 11 (Spring):26-32.
    In his theory of determination, Charles Peirce considered two processes of determination, the semiotic process and epistemology. The semiotic process is an extensional process from object to interpretant that consists of an infinite chain of references that can be spatially reversible. The epistemological process of determination is temporal and irreversible, where the idea grows into the individual mind, as the universe is unfolded by the agency of mind.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. William James and His Darwinian Defense of Freewill.Matthew Crippen - 2011 - In Mark Wheeler (ed.), 150 Years of Evolution: Darwin’s Impact on Contemporary Thought and Culture. pp. 68-89.
    Abstract If asked about the Darwinian influence on William James, some might mention his pragmatic position that ideas are “mental modes of adaptation,” and that our stock of ideas evolves to meet our changing needs. However, while this is not obviously wrong, it fails to capture what James deems most important about Darwinian theory: the notion that there are independent cycles of causation in nature. Versions of this idea undergird everything from his campaign against empiricist psychologies to his theories of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. James on Pure Experience.Joel Krueger - forthcoming - In David Evans (ed.), Understanding James, Understanding Modernism. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Realist Challenge to Conceptual Pragmatism.Peter Olen - 2015 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 7 (2):152-167.
    Although commonly cited as one of the philosophers responsible for the resurgence of interest in pragmatism, Wilfrid Sellars was also the son of Roy Wood Sellars, one of the most dedicated critical realists of the early 20th century. Given his father’s realism and his own ‘scientific realism,’ one might assume that the history of realism – and, despite contemporary interest, not pragmatism – would best serve as the historical background for Wilfrid Sellars’ philosophy. I argue that Wilfrid Sellars, far from (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. Hatfield on American Critical Realism.Alexander Klein - 2015 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):154-166.
    The turn of the last century saw an explosion of philosophical realisms, both in the United States and in the United Kingdom. Gary Hatfield helpfully asks whether we can impose order on this chaotic scene by portraying these diverse actors as responding to a common philosophical problem—the so-called problem of the external world, as articulated by William Hamilton. I argue that we should not place the American realism that grows out of James’s neutral monism in this problem space. James first (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Selves and Communities in the Work of William James.Francesca Bordogna - 2004 - Streams of William James 6 (3):30-38.
    This paper suggests that James’s account of the self developed in tandem with his social vision. The Jamesian self promoted social transformation and the creation of a strong and virtuous citizenry that could participate in political action and initiate effective social change in a pluralistic, democratic society. The paper also argues that James’s account of the self represented an attempt to rethink the relationship between individual and society in a way that would allow both for pluralism and for community.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Radical Empiricism, Critical Realism, and American Functionalism: James and Sellars.Gary Hatfield - 2015 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (1):129-53.
    As British and American idealism waned, new realisms displaced them. The common background of these new realisms emphasized the problem of the external world and the mind-body problem, as bequeathed by Reid, Hamilton, and Mill. During this same period, academics on both sides of the Atlantic recognized that the natural sciences were making great strides. Responses varied. In the United States, philosophical response focused particularly on functional psychology and Darwinian adaptedness. This article examines differing versions of that response in William (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. The Ethics Of Energy: William James’s Moral Philosophy In Focus. By Sergio Franzese. Ontos, 2008. 237 Pp. $124.Francesca Bordogna - 2010 - William James Studies 5:39-44.
    The Ethics of Energy. William James’s Moral Philosophy in Focus... brings to completion [Sergio] Franzese’s reinterpretation of James’s work, as a “philosophical anthropology,” which Franzese began articulating in several essays and in his first book on James, L’uomo indeterminato. Saggio su William James (Rome: Anselmo, 2001). James’s diverse philosophical and psychological work, Franzese argued, aimed to outline a philosophical “science of man.” This philosophical anthropology, as James once wrote about philosophy, would be erected on the building blocks provided by the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. PHILOSOPHY IN TRANSITION: JOHN DEWEY's “LOST” MANUSCRIPT.Serge Grigoriev - 2014 - History and Theory 53 (3):372-386.
    The intention of this essay is to offer a reading of John Dewey’s recently found manuscript (considered lost for decades), Unmodern Philosophy and Modern Philosophy, as a kind of philosophical history leading up to the formulation of the key problems to be addressed by the general framework of Dewey’s cultural naturalism. I argue, first, that cultural naturalism has direct implications for the way that we think about history, and that Dewey’s recently recovered manuscript reflects this in its conception of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Normativity and Reality in Peirce’s Thought.Serge Grigoriev - 2014 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 6 (1):88-106.
    The purpose of the essay is to explore some points pertaining to Peirce’s conception of reality, with a special emphasis on the themes developed in his later writings (such as normativity, common sense, and the logic of signs). The resulting proposal advances a preliminary reading of some key issues (arising in connection with Peirce’s discussions of reality and truth), configured with a view to the socially sustainable, coordinated practices of inquiry that are intrinsically embedded in the biological and cultural dynamics (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Perception, Empiricism, and Pragmatist Realism.Serge Grigoriev - 2011 - Contemporary Pragmatism 8 (1):191-210.
    The essay compares Peirce's pragmatist approach to the problem of perceptual experience as a fallible foundation of knowledge to a sophisticated empiricist take on the issue. The comparison suggests that, while empiricism can accommodate the idea of perception as fallible, theoretically laden, and containing conjectural elements, the cardinal difference between pragmatism and empiricism consists in the pragmatist insistence on the intrinsic intelligibility of experience, which also serves as the ultimate source of all forms of intelligibility; whereas empiricism retains a penchant (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Nietzsche on Truth: A Pragmatic View?Pietro Gori - 2013 - In Renate Reschke (ed.), Nietzscheforschung. Akademie Verlag.
    In this paper I deal with Nietzsche's theory of knowledge in the context of 19th century epistemology. In particular, I argue that, even though Nietzsche shows the ontological lack of content of truths (both on the theoretic and on the moral plane), he nevertheless leaves the space for a practical use of them, in a way that can be compared with William James' pragmatism. I thus deal with Nietzsche's and James' concept of "truth", and show their relationship with some outcomes (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Hegel and Pragmatism.Paul Redding - 2014 - In Michael Baur (ed.), G. W. F. Hegel: Key Concepts. Routledge.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Consonances Between Liberalism and Pragmatism. Hay - 2012 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 48 (2):141-168.
    This paper is an attempt to identify certain consonances between contemporary liberalism and classical pragmatism. I identify four of the most trenchant criticisms of classical liberalism presented by pragmatist figures such as James, Peirce, Dewey, Addams, and Hocking: that liberalism overemphasizes negative liberty, that it is overly individualistic, that its pluralism is suspect, that it is overly abstract. I then argue that these deficits of liberalism in its historical incarnations are being addressed by contemporary liberals. Contemporary liberals, I show, have (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Empiricism, Pragmatism, and the Settlement Movement.Tom Burke - 2010 - The Pluralist 5 (3):73-88.
    This paper examines the settlement movement (a social reform movement during the Progressive Era, roughly 1890–1920) in order to illustrate what pragmatism is and is not. In 1906, Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch proposed an analysis of settlement house methods. Because of her emphasis on interpretation and action, and because of the nature of the settlement movement as a social reform effort with vitally important consequences for everyone involved, it might be thought that her analysis would be pragmatist in character. This paper (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Pragmatism and Reference. [REVIEW]Tom Burke - 2009 - Newsletter of the Society for the Advancement of American Philosophy 37 (108):22-25.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 122