View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

20 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
  1. added 2018-08-03
    A New Reading of Aritsotle's "Hyle".Dennis F. Polis - 1991 - Modern Schoolman 68 (3):225-244.
    Aritsotle's hyle is contrasted with Plato's chora and Aquinas's prima materia. It is argued that Plato and Aristotle developed their concepts in response to very different needs, and that Aquinas's theory reflects a conflation of their views by Neoplatonic commentators. Hyle is shown to be an active potential to a determinate form in contrast to Aquinas's prima materia, which is a purely indeterminate passive potential. This gives a point of attachment in Aristotle's philosophy of nature for the later notion of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2018-06-06
    Blood, Matter, and Necessity.David Ebrey - 2015 - In Theory and Practice in Aristotle's Natural Science. Cambridge, UK: pp. 61-76.
    According to most scholars, in the Parts of Animals Aristotle frequently provides explanations in terms of material necessity, as well as explanations in terms of that-for-the-sake-of-which, i.e., final causes. In this paper, I argue that we misunderstand both matter and the way that Aristotle explains things using necessity if we interpret Aristotle as explaining things in terms of material necessity. Aristotle does not use the term “matter” very frequently in his detailed discussions of animal parts; when he does use it, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2018-05-01
    Why Continuous Motions Cannot Be Composed of Sub-Motions: Aristotle on Change, Rest, and Actual and Potential Middles.Caleb Cohoe - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (1):37-71.
    I examine the reasons Aristotle presents in Physics VIII 8 for denying a crucial assumption of Zeno’s dichotomy paradox: that every motion is composed of sub-motions. Aristotle claims that a unified motion is divisible into motions only in potentiality (δυνάμει). If it were actually divided at some point, the mobile would need to have arrived at and then have departed from this point, and that would require some interval of rest. Commentators have generally found Aristotle’s reasoning unconvincing. Against David Bostock (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2018-05-01
    When and Why Understanding Needs Phantasmata: A Moderate Interpretation of Aristotle’s De Memoria and De Anima on the Role of Images in Intellectual Activities.Caleb Cohoe - 2016 - Phronesis: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy 61 (3):337-372.
    I examine the passages where Aristotle maintains that intellectual activity employs φαντάσματα (images) and argue that he requires awareness of the relevant images. This, together with Aristotle’s claims about the universality of understanding, gives us reason to reject the interpretation of Michael Wedin and Victor Caston, on which φαντάσματα serve as the material basis for thinking. I develop a new interpretation by unpacking the comparison Aristotle makes to the role of diagrams in doing geometry. In theoretical understanding of mathematical and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  5. added 2018-05-01
    Why the Intellect Cannot Have a Bodily Organ: De Anima 3.4.Caleb Cohoe - 2013 - Phronesis 58 (4):347-377.
    I reconstruct Aristotle’s reasons for thinking that the intellect cannot have a bodily organ. I present Aristotle’s account of the aboutness or intentionality of cognitive states, both perceptual and intellectual. On my interpretation, Aristotle’s account is based around the notion of cognitive powers taking on forms in a special preservative way. Based on this account, Aristotle argues that no physical structure could enable a bodily part or combination of bodily parts to produce or determine the full range of forms that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  6. added 2018-02-22
    Salvando os Fenômenos: A Realidade do devir na física de Aristóteles.Erick de Oliveira Santos Costa - 2016 - Dissertation, UFRRJ, Brazil
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2018-02-01
    Resenha de Cohen, Sheldon M., Aristotle on Nature and Incomplete Substance, Cambridge University Press, 1996. [REVIEW]Lucas Angioni - 2000 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 102:225-232.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. added 2018-01-10
    A natureza formal dos corpos homogêneos e da constituição orgânica em Aristóteles.Rodrigo Romão de Carvalho - 2014 - Anais de História E Filosofia da Biologia.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2017-12-31
    Réceptivité et résistance de la matière au mouvement local.Eraci Oliveira - 2015 - Epekeina 6 (2):1-12.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2017-11-20
    Física I & II (Preliminar, 2002).Lucas Angioni - 2002 - Campinas, Brazil: Instituto de Filosofia e Ciências Humanas, Universidade de Campinas.
    Tradução preliminar em pré-print. A Tradução definitiva é a de 2009.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   86 citations  
  11. added 2017-09-27
    The Hermeneutic Problem of Potency and Activity in Aristotle.Mark Sentesy - 2017 - In The Challenge of Aristotle. Sofia, Bulgaria: Sofia University Press.
    Of Aristotle’s core terms, potency (dunamis) and actuality (energeia) are among the most important. But when we attempt to understand what they mean, we face the following problem: their primary meaning is movement, as a source (dunamis) or as movement itself (energeia). We therefore have to understand movement in order to understand them. But the structure of movement is itself articulated using these terms: it is the activity of a potential being, as potent. This paper examines this hermeneutic circle, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2017-09-03
    Helen S. Lang. The Order of Nature in Aristotle’s Physics: Place and the Elements. Xii + 324 Pp., Bibl., Index. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1998. $80. [REVIEW]Monte Johnson - 2004 - Isis 95 (4):687-688.
    A review of Helen Lang's monograph on Aristotle's physics.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2016-12-25
    A noção de causalidade final na filosofia da natureza de Aristoteles.Luis Marcio Nogueira Fontes - 2005 - Dissertation, University of Campinas
    This MA thesis investigates Aristotle's natural teleology, its presuppositions and implications. In order to achieve a better understanding of his theory, a study of the criticisms he addresses to his predecessors - Platonists and materialists - is made. On the one hand, Aristotle exposes thoses theories for not being able to explain certain natural facts, such as the constancy of reproduction; on the other, he finds the origin of this deficiency in the emphasis these philosophers give to one cause alone (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. added 2016-03-21
    Divine and Mortal Motivation: On the Movement of Life in Aristotle and Heidegger.Jussi Backman - 2005 - Continental Philosophy Review 38 (3-4):241-261.
    The paper discusses Heidegger's early notion of the “movedness of life” (Lebensbewegtheit) and its intimate connection with Aristotle's concept of movement (kinēsis). Heidegger's aim in the period of Being and Time was to “overcome” the Greek ideal of being as ousia – constant and complete presence and availability – by showing that the background for all meaningful presence is Dasein, the ecstatically temporal context of human being. Life as the event of finitude is characterized by an essential lack and incompleteness, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15. added 2016-02-08
    Aristóteles, As Partes dos Animais, Livro I.Lucas Angioni - 1999 - Cadernos de História e Filosofia da Ciência.
    Translation of Aristotle's Parts of Animals Book I into Portuguese, with full commentaries.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  16. added 2014-08-26
    hilemorfismo como modelo de explicação científica na filosofia da natureza em Aristóteles'.Lucas Angioni - 2000 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 41 (102):132-164.
    My aim is to examine Aristotle's hylomorphism as a model for scientific explanation of living beings. I argue that the issue of matter-form relation should be connected with the opposition between the necessity of material and efficient causes and the teleology of forms. Form (as "telos") is a principle able to organize the appropriate conjunction of material and efficient causes. Formal and final causes are not a trick for filling the "gap in causation", nor are they bare heuristic tools for (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  17. added 2013-12-08
    Sobre a definição de natureza.Lucas Angioni - 2010 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 51 (122):521-542.
    I discuss in this paper Aristotle’s definition of nature in Physics 192b 20-23. I intend to prove that this definition has to be taken as a set of three (not only two) conditions: the first condition just establishes that nature is a sort of cause; the second condition concerns the relationship between nature and the natural thing that has it as a cause; the third condition concerns the relationship between nature and the properties that natural things have from nature’s causality.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  18. added 2013-12-08
    A Noção Aristotélica de Matéria.Lucas Angioni - 2007 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 17 (1):47-90.
    I discuss some of Aristotle’s scattered remarks from which one can construct his conception of matter. Aristotle seems to oscillate between two conceptions: one in which matter is the principle of becoming, another in which matter is a constituent element with no contribution for processes of becoming. Sometimes Aristotle takes matter as a thing independent in itself, and the correlated form is a feature that does not contribute to the matter’s essence, nor is a necessary condition for its existence. But (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  19. added 2013-12-08
    Necessidade, Teleologia e Hilemorfismo em Aristóteles.Lucas Angioni - 2006 - Cadernos de História E Filosofia da Ciência 16 (1):33-57.
    I argue that Aristotle’s teleology in natural science (more specifically, in biology) is not incompatible with his admissions of the “brute necessity” of the movements of matter. Aristotle thinks that the brute necessity emerging from the movements of matter is not sufficient to explain why living beings are what they are and behave the way they behave. Nevertheless, Aristotle takes this brute necessity to be a sine qua non condition in biological explanations. The full explanation of the features of living (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  20. added 2013-08-17
    Aristotle's Theory of Potentiality.Mohan Matthen - 2014 - In John P. Lizza (ed.), Potentiality: Metaphysical and Bioethical Dimensions. Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 29-48.
    In this paper, I examine Aristotle's notion of potentiality as it applies to the beginning of life. Aristotle’s notion of natural kinēsis implies that we should not treat the entity at the beginning of embryonic development as human, or indeed as the same as the one that is born. This leads us to ask: When does the embryo turn into a human? Aristotle’s own answer to this question is very harsh. Bracketing the views that lead to this harsh answer, his (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark