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  1. The Artificial, the Natural and the Necessary in Aristotle’s Physics II.Abhijeet Bardapurkar - 2011 - Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 28 (3):33-42.
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  2. UMA ANÁLISE DA (IN)JUSTIÇA DA CONDIÇÃO ESCRAVIDÃO NA POLÍTICA DE ARISTÓTELES A PARTIR DE HANNAH ARENDT.Daniel Pires Nunes - 2021 - In Giovane Rodrigues Jardim & Cristiéle Santos de Souza (eds.), Pluralidade, mundo e política: interlúdios em tempos sombrios. Porto Alegre: Mundo Acadêmico. pp. 45-55.
    Este capítulo se propõe a analisar os fundamentos utilizados por Aristóteles (2006) para justificar a escravidão. Para isso, é tomada como chave de leitura a categorização das atividades humanas fundamentais proposta por Hannah Arendt (2008). A escravidão no mundo grego antigo era tida como uma forma de liberar o cidadão dos afazeres domésticos e do trabalho para que pudesse ter ócio e, assim, dedicar-se às atividades entre seus iguais, sobretudo à política.
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  3. The Imaginal as Spectacle: An Aristotelian Interpretation of Contemporary Politics.Abigail Iturra - 2021 - Interfere 2:35-49.
    Our contemporary politics faces the paradoxical problem that while we are inundated with images on our screens, we nevertheless seem to lack creative political imagination to conceive of solutions to our global problems. One account for this paradox is Chiara Bottici’s suggestion that the constant stream of virtual images produced qualitatively alters them to such an extent that they become ends in themselves: thus, spectacularizing our politics. My claim, against Bottici’s, is that it is not the case that the increase (...)
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  4. Aristotle.Anne Jeffrey - 2021 - In Stewart Goetz & Charles Taliaferro (eds.), Encyclopedia for Philosophy of Religion. Wiley Blackwell.
    Aristotle (384-322 BC) was an ancient Greek philosopher, pupil of Plato, and tutor of Alexander the Great. His works span the topics of biology, metaphysics, mind, logic, language, science, epistemology, ethics, and politics. Aristotle held that there are many divine beings, but a supremely divine being is the first cause of the universe and the goodness of all other beings. This divine being plays a fundamental explanatory role in Aristotle’s thought.
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  5. The Beauty of Failure: Hamartia in Aristotle's Poetics.Hilde Vinje - 2021 - Classical Quarterly 71 (2):582-600.
    In Poetics 13, Aristotle claims that the protagonist in the most beautiful tragedies comes to ruin through some kind of ‘failure’—in Greek, hamartia. There has been notorious disagreement among scholars about the moral responsibility involved in hamartia. This article defends the old reading of hamartia as a character flaw, but with an important modification: rather than explaining the hero's weakness as general weakness of will (akrasia), it argues that the tragic hero is blinded by temper (thumos) or by a pursuit (...)
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  6. Aristotle and the Classical Paradigm of Wisdom.Jason Costanzo - 2021 - Philosophy International Journal 4 (3).
    The essay examines the ancient Greek origin of philosophy relative to the concept of wisdom. The nature of the sage is first considered. The sage is one who is deemed wise in his or her performances. But what is ‘wise’ about such performances? The Socratic denial of sage status is considered in reference to this. Socrates concludes that he is not wise as the gods are wise, but that he is wise insofar as he knows that he is not wise. (...)
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  7. On Justice as Dance.Joshua M. Hall - forthcoming - Eidos. A Journal for Philosophy of Culture.
    This article is part of a larger project that explores how to channel people’s passion for popular arts into legal social justice, by reconceiving law as a kind of poetry and justice as dance, and exploring different possible relationships between said legal poetry and dancing justice. I begin by rehearsing my previous new conception of social justice as organismic empowerment, and my interpretive method of dancing-with. I then apply this method to the following four “ethico-political choreographies of justice”: (1) the (...)
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  8. L’aristotélisation gadamérienne de Platon ou l’herméneutique dialogique à la lumière du problème de l’ironie.Antoine Pageau-St-Hilaire - 2016 - Bulletin d'Analyse Phénoménologique 12:1-19.
    Cette étude cherche à rendre compte d’un trait particulier et pratiquement inobservé dans la fondation gadamérienne de l’herméneutique philosophique. Si l’on connaît bien le rôle du platonisme — et plus spécifiquement du dialogue platonicien — parmi les sources au sein desquelles Gadamer a puisé pour formuler le caractère dialogique du comprendre, on a rarement noté que la phénoménologie du dialogue sur laquelle s’appuie une telle fondation s’inscrivait en faux par rapport à son modèle sur un point bien précis : l’ironie, (...)
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  9. Zaki Nageeb’s Criticism of Greek Philosophy.Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 1997 - Arab Philosophical Journal 5 (1):88-100.
    Zeki Najib Mahmoud’s Critique of Greek Philosophy This research compares Dr. Zeki Najib Mahmoud’s criticism of Greek philosophy tenets to the original texts by focusing on five areas: 1.A criticism of the Platonic and Aristotelian concept of art. 2.A criticism of Plato’s metaphysics. 3. A criticism of Aristotle’s logic and his two theories relevant to identification and the four causes. 4.A criticism of the Greek philosophical concepts of the circle and virtue. 5.The employment of the analytical method in criticizing Socrates (...)
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  10. Aristotle, Confucius and Rousseau on Human Nature and the Golden Mean: A Comparative Analysis.Abidemi Israel Ogunyomi & Emmanuel Adetokunbo Ogundele - 2021 - Prajna Vihara 22 (1):71-84.
    Philosophers of different cultural traditions have written extensively on the nature of the human being. In the ancient times, Aristotle contended that human beings are not naturally good but are led to be good in the society through education. He also expounded a doctrine of the golden mean, a kind of middle-way philosophy, as a theory on how human beings learn to be good, achieve happiness and live the good life. In the modern times, Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau also provided (...)
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  11. Aristotle and Linearity in Substance, Measure, and Motion.Paul Taborsky - forthcoming - Axiomathes:1-25.
    The model of a closed linear measure space, which can be used to model Aristotle’s treatment of motion (kinesis), can be analogically extended to the qualitative ‘spaces’ implied by his theory of contraries in Physics I and in Metaphysics Iota, and to the dimensionless ‘space’ of the unity of matter and form discussed in book Eta of the Metaphysics. By examining Aristotle’s remarks on contraries, the subject of change, continuity, and the unity of matter and form, Aristotle’s thoughts on motion, (...)
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  12. Zhuangzi and Aristotle on What a Thing Is.Chenyang Li - 2003 - In Comparative Approach to Chinese Philosophy. London: pp. 263-277.
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  13. La ontología de la premoción física según Pedro de Ledesma.David Torrijos Castrillejo - 2021 - In Proceedings of the Seventh World Conference on Metaphysics. Pontifical University of Salamanca, Spain October 24-27, 2018. Fondazione Idente di Studi e di Ricerca. pp. 668-673.
    Throughout the history of Thomism, interpretations of the ontology of God’s physical premotion of human free will have been divided mainly into two main groups. Most authors have thought that physical premotion constitutes a certain “entity” infused by God in the creature, although not all of them accept the account of Cabrera, who affirmed that premotion was a “quality”. On the other hand, there are some authors who understand premotion as a direct intervention of God in the vital act of (...)
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  14. Kobieta i kobiecość w ujęciu Tomasza z Akwinu a neotomistyczna etyka feministyczna. Analiza krytyczna.Tatiana Barkovskiy - 2021 - Edukacja Filozoficzna 71:7-35.
    Within the context of women’s studies, Thomas Aquinas is probably best known for his paraphrase of Aristotle’s view, which describes woman as a “deformed man”. While the Philosopher indeed adopts the empirically dubious premise of woman’s value being intrinsically inferior to man, which he consistently implements throughout the pages of his many works, in Thomas’s case the issue of gender is not addressed so clearly and definitively. Above all, Aquinas does not call woman “something deformed”, but “only” occasional and misbegotten. (...)
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  15. Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and Protestantism.David S. Sytsma - 2021 - Academia Letters 1650:1-8.
    This is a brief introduction to the origin and development of Protestant ethical works in the tradition of Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.
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  16. Scholarship on Aristotle's Ethical and Political Philosophy (2011-2020).Thornton Lockwood - manuscript
    In anticipation of updating annotated bibliographies on Aristotle’s Ethics and Politics for Oxford Bibliography Online, I have sought to keep a running tabulation of all books, edited collections, translations, and journal articles which are primarily devoted to Aristotle’s ethical and political writings (including their historical reception but excluding neo–Aristotelian virtue ethics). In general, criteria for inclusion in this bibliography are that the work be: (1) publication in a peer–reviewed or academic/university press between 2011–2020; (2) “substantially” devoted to one of Aristotle’s (...)
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  17. Luck Egalitarianism and the History of Political Thought.Carl Knight - 2016 - In Camilla Boisen & Matthew C. Murray (eds.), Distributive Justice Debates in Political and Social Thought. Abingdon, UK: pp. 26-38.
    Luck egalitarianism is a family of egalitarian theories of distributive justice that give a special place to luck, choice, and responsibility. These theories can be understood as responding to perceived weaknesses in influential earlier theories of both the left – in particular Rawls’ liberal egalitarianism (1971) – and the right – Nozick’s libertarianism (1974) stands out here. Rawls put great emphasis on the continuity of his theory with the great social contract theories of modern political thought, particularly emphasising its Kantian (...)
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  18. Geoffrey of Aspall: Questions on Aristotle’s Physics, Ed. Silvia Donati and Cecilia Trifogli, Trans. E. Jennifer Ashworth and Cecilia Trifogli, 2 Vols. Auctores Britannici Medii Aevi 26. Oxford: Oxford University Press, for the British Academy, 2017. [REVIEW]Boaz Faraday Schuman - 2021 - Journal of Medieval Latin 31.
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  19. F. Brentano y la concepción escolástica de ser intencional.David Torrijos Castrillejo - 2021 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 38 (2):293-306.
    Brentano claims to have taken his idea of intentionality from scholastic thought. However, in St. Thomas Aquinas, intentionality is not just the mark of knowledge, although some scholastics have interpreted it this way, even during Brentano’s lifetime. Moreover, to elaborate his idea of intentional presence, the German philosopher was not only inspired by him, but also by Francisco Suárez. In an unpublished manuscript from his legacy, Brentano understands Suarez’s objective concept as a representation of the thing in the psyche. Thus, (...)
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  20. Review of Mayhew, The Female in Aristotle's Biology. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2004 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 9:19.
    Natural philosophers make mistakes. Descartes got the laws of inertia wrong, Kant misunderstood the primacy of Euclidian geometry, and almost everyone (except perhaps Aristarchus of Samos) prior to the discovery of the telescope mistakenly thought that the solar system was geocentric. That we find Aristotle mistaken on questions in the life sciences — questions which required advances such as the microscope to even articulate — should come as little surprise. There seems nothing remarkable in the fact that Aristotle mistakenly thought (...)
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  21. Review of Balot, Greek Political Thought. [REVIEW]Thornton Lockwood - 2007 - Bryn Mawr Classical Review 8:13.
    Balot’s (B.) Greek Political Thought aims to provide an “introductory guide” for undergraduate and graduate students to ancient Greek thinkers (broadly construed) from Homer through Epicurus who wrote in both systematic and unsystematic ways about life in the Greek polis (viii). B. notes that he has not tried to locate his arguments within current scholarly discussions (although he does include a 19 page bibliographic essay that provides an overview of Anglophone scholarship on Greek political thought). Nonetheless, he states that he (...)
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  22. On Informative Objects.Niel Bezrookove - manuscript
    A series of notes elaborating on some of the concepts of ”Seepage in Objects: A Primer,” a previous paper. The meaning of an object in terms of being informative is discussed, contrasted to Aristotlian and Russellian views on objects, and lastly the concept of meaninglessness is briefly touched upon.
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  23. Speech of Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]Abduljaleel Kadhim Alwali - 2018 - Arab Journal for the Humanities 36:307-318.
    The book Speech of Greek Philosophy is worth reading for a number of reasons, including: It covers history of Greek philosophy from its early days, Thales and his natural school to the Hellenistic age. In addition, the modern world admits, whether in the East or the West, that it owes the Greek mentality the overwhelming majority of its philosophical, literary and artistic products. It is the special belief of European scholars that the Greeks are masters of the modern world in (...)
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  24. Formal Causes for Powers Theorists.Giacomo Giannini & Stephen Mumford - 2021 - In Ludger Jansen & Petter Sandstad (eds.), Neo-Aristotelian Perspectives on Formal Causation. Routledge. pp. 87-106.
    In this paper we examine whether and how powers ontologies can back formal causation. We attempt to answer three questions: i) what is formal causation; ii) whether we need formal causation, and iii) whether formal causation need powers and whether it can be grounded in powers. We take formal causal explanations to be explanations in which something's essence features prominently in the explanans. Three kinds of essential explanations are distinguished: constitutive, consequential, and those singling out something's propria. This last kind (...)
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  25. Speech of Greek Philosophy. [REVIEW]Abduljaleel Alwali - 2018 - Arab Journal for the Humanities 36 (143):307-318.
    The book Speech of Greek Philosophy is worth reading for a number of reasons, including: It covers history of Greek philosophy from its early days, Thales and his natural school to the Hellenistic age. In addition, the modern world admits, whether in the East or the West, that it owes the Greek mentality the overwhelming majority of its philosophical, literary and artistic products. It is the special belief of European scholars that the Greeks are masters of the modern world in (...)
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  26. Greek Philosophy.Abduljaleel Alwali - 2009 - Amman, Jordan: Dar Alwarq Publishing House.
    In this book the author presented the history of the Greek philosophy that extends from the six century BC till the six century AC. He divided the book into three main stages: Philosophy before Socrates: It extended from 6th century BC to mid 5th century BC. This stage began with Thales and his school of Physics; Heraclitus; Pythagoras school; Eleaties School; then Empedocles and Anaxagoras; Democritus and Sophists school. The themes of philosophical contemplation were nature, universe and man. Socratic Method (...)
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  27. Seepage in Objects: A Primer.Niel Bezrookove - manuscript
    A critique of ontology which introduces seepage, the process of properties revealing themselves from the matrix forms of an object. What follows is the observation that these properties have their own system of relations, placed in the context of a culture of objects which engages a revealing process. An argument is presented for considering organization as the principle which allows for seepage, understood as an inherently informative and intuitive process where the organization of objects reveals some property and consequently makes (...)
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  28. What is Spoken of When We Speak About Being.Niel Bezrookove - manuscript
    τὰ ὄντα ἰέναι τε πάντα καὶ μένειν οὐδέν: Another look at being, asking what a interlocutor means to show by saying they feel themselves to be something. An ambiguity of the verb "to be" is disambiguated to reveal that it can be meant to show what something is and a process of being something. The relationship between being and essence is made by describing engagement through the encounter, giving us a non-exhaustive account of something's essence. Practice is then understood as (...)
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  29. A Short Notice on Heinaman's Account of Aristotle's Definition of Kinesis in Physica III.Javier Echenique - 2010 - Journal of Ancient Philosophy 4 (2):1-5.
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  30. Vom Fehlen des Sinnes zum Sinn des Fehlens. Euripides, "Iphigenie bei den Taurern", vv. 218ff. ökonomisch gelesen.Sergiusz Kazmierski - 2021 - In Ivo De Gennaro, Sergiusz Kazmierski, Ralf Lüfter & Robert Simon (eds.), Ökonomie als Problem. Interdisziplinäre Beiträge zu einer Kritik ökonomischen Wissens. Freiburg-München: pp. 139-184.
    Ausgehend von den vv. 218ff. der Iphigenie bei den Taurern zeigt der Beitrag, wie in dem Drama die tragische Dimension des menschlichen Daseins als eine unwirtliche zu Tage tritt. Diese offenbart eine wirtliche Ökonomie, die diesem Dasein ein Fundament geben kann, das nicht zunächst nach dem ausgerichtet ist, was recht und billig erscheint, sondern, allem voran, im sinnstiftenden Reichtum eines tragischen Schicksals wurzelt, das dem Menschen sein Eigenes und Freies zu gewähren vermag.
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  31. On Law and Justice Attributed to Archytas of Tarentum.Johnson Monte & P. S. Horky - 2020 - In David Wolfsdorf (ed.), Early Greek Ethics. Oxford: pp. 455-490.
    Archytas of Tarentum, a contemporary and associate of Plato, was a famous Pythagorean, mathematician, and statesman of Tarentum. Although his works are lost and most of the fragments attributed to him were composed in later eras, they nevertheless contain valuable information about his thought. In particular, the fragments of On Law and Justice are likely based on a work by the early Peripatetic biographer Aristoxenus of Tarentum. The fragments touch on key themes of early Greek ethics, including: written and unwritten (...)
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  32. Observaciones Sobre Las Formas de Gobierno En la Polı́tica de Aristóteles (1652).Robert Filmer & Pablo Rojas Olmedo - 2021 - Mutatis Mutandis: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 14.
    El presente ensayo fue publicado por su amigo ı́ntimo y editor Richard Royston mientras el autor vivı́a en 1652 y republicado en la emergencia sucedida por la fama de Patriarcha a partir de 1679. Las Observaciones... es un ensayo derivado del Patriarcha en los que reelabora y afirma sus comentarios sobre Aristóteles; se establecen ası́ numerosas citas y argumentos paralelos entre los dos textos, sobre todo en los capı́tulos IX, XI, XV, pero en especial en el XII del Patriarcha. Con (...)
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  33. The Philosopher and The Rebel.Britton Watson - manuscript
    I briefly discuss the issues with Aristotle's concept of balance and justice and contrast this with the concept of liberty argued by Camus.
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  34. Ancient Modes of Philosophical Inquiry.Jens Kristian Larsen & Philipp Steinkrüger - 2020 - History of Philosophy & Logical Analysis 1 (23).
    At least since Socrates, philosophy has been understood as the desire for acquiring a special kind of knowledge, namely wisdom, a kind of knowledge that human beings ordinarily do not possess. According to ancient thinkers this desire may result from a variety of causes: wonder or astonishment, the bothersome or even painful realization that one lacks wisdom, or encountering certain hard perplexities or aporiai. As a result of this basic understanding of philosophy, Greek thinkers tended to regard philosophy as an (...)
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  35. Aesthetics in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein.Jerold J. Abrams - 2018 - Journal of Science Fiction and Philosophy 1:1-19.
    In Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein the brilliant scientist Viktor Frankenstein constructs and animates a gigantic and superhumanly powerful man. But upon animation, Frankenstein discovers he neglected beauty, and beholding his hideous creation flees in horror without even naming the man. Abandoned and alone the monster leaves society, yet secretly observing humanity learns language and philosophy and eventually discovers humanity’s self-understanding and his own self-understanding to be grounded in beauty rather than reason.
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  36. Has Oppy Done Away with the Aristotelian Proof?Tyler McNabb & Michael DeVito - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (5):723-731.
    In this essay, we engage with Graham Oppy’s work on Thomas Aquinas’s First Way. We argue that Oppy’s objections shouldn’t be seen as successful. In order to establish this thesis, we first analyze Oppy’s exegesis of Aquinas’s First Way, as well as the counter‐arguments he puts forth (including the charge that Aquinas’s argument is invalid or, if deemed valid, forces one to adopt determinism). Next, we address Oppy’s handling of the contemporary scholarship covering the First Way. Specifically, we lay out (...)
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  37. La divisibilidad del alma en la psicología de Aristóteles. ¿Es posible conciliar el hilemorfismo y el cardiocentrismo?César Augusto Mora Alonso - 2018 - Cuadernos de Filología Clásica. Estudios Griegos E Indoeuropeos 28:129-139.
    El propósito de este trabajo consiste en destacar el papel central que tiene el problema de la divisibilidad del alma en los dos enfoques bajo los que se presenta la investigación psicológica aristotélica: el hilemórfico y el cardiocéntrico. Mientras que el primero sostiene que el alma es la forma o esencia del cuerpo entero, el segundo aboga por la localización del alma en el corazón, pues asegura que allí se manifiestan los principios de las partes o facultades anímicas. A simple (...)
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  38. The Problem of Intermediates, an Introduction.Nicholas Baima - 2018 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 18:41-44.
    Provides a brief introduction to the Problem of Intermediates in Plato and the stances taken toward this issue in this volume of the Plato Journal.
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  39. Dispositive Causality and the Art of Medicine.Chad Engelland - 2017 - Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 91:159-170.
    For many philosophers, the relation of medicine to health is exemplary for understanding the relation of human power to nature in general. Drawing on Heidegger and Aquinas, this paper examines the relation of art to nature as it emerges in the second book of Aristotle’s Physics, and it does so by articulating the duality of efficient causality. The art of medicine operates as a dispositive cause rather than as a perfective cause; it removes obstacles to the achievement of health, but (...)
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  40. Non-Impositional Rule in Confucius and Aristotle.Matthew D. Walker - 2019 - In Alexus McLeod (ed.), The Bloomsbury Research Handbook of Early Chinese Ethics and Political Philosophy. London, UK: pp. 187-204.
    I examine and compare Confucian wu-wei rule and Aristotelian non-imperative rule as two models of non-impositional rule. How exactly do non-impositional rulers, according to these thinkers, generate order? And how might a Confucian/Aristotelian dialogue concerning non-impositional rule in distinctively political contexts proceed? Are Confucians and Aristotelians in deep disagreement, or do they actually have more in common than they initially seem?
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  41. Empedocles Democraticus: Hellenistic Biography at the Intersection of Philosophy and Politics.Phillip Sidney Horky - 2016 - In Mauro Bonazzi & Stefan Schorn (eds.), Bios Philosophos: Philosophy in Ancient Greek Biography. 2300 Turnhout, Belgium: pp. 37-71.
    Diogenes Laertius (8.63-6) preserves a fascinating account of the Presocratic philosopher Empedocles' life. There, drawing on evidence from Aristotle, Xanthus, and Timaeus of Tauromenium, the biographer provides several anecdotes which are meant to demonstrate how Empedocles had, contrary to expectation, been a democratic philosopher - a paradox of itself in Ancient Greece. This article unpacks the complex web woven by Diogenes and argues that there is no good reason to assume that Empedocles was indeed a democratic philosopher, and moreover, that (...)
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  42. Dyschereia and Aporia: The Formation of a Philosophical Term.Wei Cheng - 2018 - TAPA 148 (1):75-110.
    Plato’s nephew Speusippus has been widely accepted as the historical person behind the mask of the anti-hedonists in Phlb. 42b–44c. This hypothesis is supported by, inter alia, the link between Socrates’ char- acterization of them as δυσχερεῖς and the frequent references of δυσχέρεια as ἀπορία to Speusippus in Aristotle’s Metaphysics MN. This study argues against assigning any privileged status to Speusippus in the assimilation of δυσχέρεια with ἀπορία. Instead, based on a comprehensive survey of how δυσχερ- words were used in (...)
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  43. What's Aristotelian About Neo‐Aristotelian Virtue Ethics?Sukaina Hirji - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (3):671-696.
    It is commonly assumed that Aristotle's ethical theory shares deep structural similarities with neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics. I argue that this assumption is a mistake, and that Aristotle's ethical theory is both importantly distinct from the theories his work has inspired, and independently compelling. I take neo-Aristotelian virtue ethics to be characterized by two central commitments: (i) virtues of character are defined as traits that reliably promote an agent's own flourishing, and (ii) virtuous actions are defined as the sorts of actions (...)
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  44. Aristotle on the Heterogeneity of Pleasure.Matthew Strohl - 2018 - In Lisa Shapiro (ed.), Pleasure: A History.
    In Nicomachean Ethics X.5, Aristotle gives a series of arguments for the claim that pleasures differ from one another in kind in accordance with the differences in kind among the activities they arise in connection with. I develop an interpretation of these arguments based on an interpretation of his theory of pleasure (which I have defended elsewhere) according to which pleasure is the perfection of perfect activity. In the course of developing this interpretation, I reconstruct Aristotle’s phenomenology of pleasure, arguing (...)
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  45. Core Aspects of Dance: Aristotle on Positure.Joshua M. Hall - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 53 (1):1.
    [First paragraph]: This article is part of a larger project in which I suggest a historically informed philosophy of dance, called “figuration,” consisting of new interpretations of canonical philosophers. Figuration consists of two major parts, comprising (a) four basic concepts, or “moves”—namely, “positure,” “gesture,” “grace,” and “resilience”—and (b) seven types, or “families” of dance—namely, “concert,” “folk,” “societal,” “agonistic,” “animal,” “astronomical,” and “discursive.” This article is devoted to the first of these four moves, as illustrated by both its importance for Aristotle (...)
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  46. El papel de la música en la educación según la Política de Aristóteles.Kênio Estrela - 2018 - Fragmentos de Cultura 28 (n.4):465-471.
    Music is a multifaceted discipline. It has repercussions in the most diverse areas of knowledge. It appears strongly in the development of education and philosophy since antiquity. As a representation of this importance we can find in Book VIII of Aristotle’s Politics an important argumentation about the role of music in the education of young people and adults in the polis. This paper will present an interpretation of Aristotle’s perspective on the role of music in education. -/- .
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  47. External Goods and the Complete Exercise of Virtue in Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics.Sukaina Hirji - 2021 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 103 (1):29-53.
    In Nicomachean Ethics 1.8, Aristotle seems to argue that certain external goods are needed for happiness because, in the first place, they are needed for virtuous activity. This has puzzled scholars. After all, it seems possible for a virtuous agent to exercise her virtuous character even under conditions of extreme hardship or deprivation. Indeed, it is natural to think these are precisely the conditions under which one's virtue shines through most clearly. Why then does Aristotle think that a wide range (...)
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  48. Aristotle's Axology.Seyed Mohammad Hosseini - 2010 - Ayeneh Marefat 20 (7):95-121.
    This Paper attempts to Jude the axiology of Aristotle’s Philosophy based on Aristotelian Philosophy. For this Purpose, we will first Prove axiology as a kind of knowledge and then we will study the relation between axiology and two others knowledge domains, that is, ontology and epistemology. We will demonstrate that values like goodness and beauty, are same final cause and formal cause for explanation of values of every thing. At least, in the nature, goodness and beauty are the idea of (...)
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  49. A Category Semantics.Paul Symington - 2018 - In Paul Hackett (ed.), Mereologies, Ontologies, and Facets: The Categorial Structure of Reality. New York: Lexington Books. pp. 65-85.
    In this paper, I present a categorial theory of meaning which asserts that the meaning of a sentence is the function from the actualization of some potentiality or the potentiality of some actuality to the truth of the sentence. I argue that it builds on the virtues of David Lewis’s Possible World Semantics but advances beyond problems that Lewis’s theory faces with its distinctly Aristotelian turn toward actuality and potentiality.
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  50. Is Human Virtue a Civic Virtue? A Reading of Aristotle's Politics 3.4.L. K. Gustin Law - 2017 - In Aristotle's Practical Philosophy: On the Relationship between His Ethics and Politics. Cham, Switzerland: Springer. pp. 93-118.
    Is the virtue of the good citizen the same as the virtue of the good man? Aristotle addresses this in Politics 3.4. His answer is twofold. On the one hand, (the account for Difference) they are not the same both because what the citizen’s virtue is depends on the constitution, on what preserves it, and on the role the citizen plays in it, and because the good citizens in the best constitution cannot all be good men, whereas the good man’s (...)
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