Art and Artworks

Edited by Nicholas Riggle (University of San Diego)
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  1. Introduction: The Place of Beauty in Contemporary Aesthetics.Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Wolfgang Huemer - 2019 - In Wolfgang Huemer & Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (eds.), Beauty. New Essays in Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art. München, Deutschland:
    The notion of beauty has endured a troublesome history over the last few decades. While for centuries beauty has been considered one of the central values of art, there have also been times when it seemed old-fashioned to even mention the term. The present volume aims to explore the nature of beauty and to shed light its place in contemporary philosphy and art practice.
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  2. Games and the Art of Agency.C. Thi Nguyen - 2019 - Philosophical Review 128 (4):423-462.
    Games may seem like a waste of time, where we struggle under artificial rules for arbitrary goals. The author suggests that the rules and goals of games are not arbitrary at all. They are a way of specifying particular modes of agency. This is what make games a distinctive art form. Game designers designate goals and abilities for the player; they shape the agential skeleton which the player will inhabit during the game. Game designers work in the medium of agency. (...)
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  3. Enriching Arts Education Through Aesthetics. Experiential Arts Integration Activities for Early Primary Education.Marina Sotiropoulou-Zormpala & Alexandra Mouriki - 2019 - London, UK: Routledge.
    Enriching Arts Education through Aesthetics examines the use of aesthetic theory as the foundation to design and implement arts activities suitable for integration in school curricula in pre-school and primary school education. This book suggests teaching practices based on the connection between aesthetics and arts education and shows that this kind of integration promotes enriched learning experiences. -/- The book explores how the core ideas of four main aesthetic approaches – the representationalist, the expressionist, the formalist, and the postmodernist – (...)
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  4. Beyond the Imagery: The Encounters of Kierkegaard and Dostoevsky with an Image of the Dead Christ.Wojciech Kaftanski - 2014 - Dostoevsky Journal. An Independent Review 14 (1): 110–129.
    Through an analysis of Kierkegaard’s and Dostoevsky’s approaches to the theme of the death of Christ – one of the major leitmotifs in the debate of their contemporaries conveyed through theological and philosophical considerations, but also expressed in novels and in art – I show how the thinkers comprehended and articulated in their works the religious challenges awaiting the modern man.
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  5. The Authority of Pleasure.Keren Gorodeisky - 2019 - Noûs 53 (4):1-22.
    The aim of the paper is to reassess the prospects of a widely neglected affective conception of the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art. On the proposed picture, the aesthetic evaluation and appreciation of art are non-contingently constituted by a particular kind of pleasure. Artworks that are valuable qua artworks merit, deserve, and call for a certain pleasure, the same pleasure that reveals (or at least purports to reveal) them to be valuable in the way that they are, and constitutes (...)
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  6. De la Trascendencia del Arte, Un Ensayo para el Arte Crítico.Markel Kortabarria - manuscript
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  7. Necessity of Origins and Multi-Origin Art.Joshua Spencer & Chris Tillman - 2018 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 62 (7):741-754.
    ABSTRACTThe Necessity of Origins is the thesis that, necessarily, if a material object wholly originates from some particular material, then it could not have wholly originated from any significantly non-overlapping material. Several philosophers have argued for this thesis using as a premise a principle that we call ‘Single Origin Necessity’. However, we argue that Single Origin Necessity is false. So any arguments for The Necessity of Origins that rely on Single Origin Necessity are unsound. We also argue that the Necessity (...)
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  8. The Carpenter as a Philosopher Artist: A Critique of Plato's Theory of Mimesis.Ilemobayo John Omogunwa - 2018 - Philosophy Pathways 222 (1).
    Plato’s theory of mimesis is expressed clearly and mainly in Plato’s Republic where he refers to his philosophy of Ideas in his definition of art, by arguing that all arts are imitative in nature. Reality according to him lies with the Idea, and the Form one confronts in this tangible world is a copy of that universal everlasting Idea. He poses that a carpenter’s chair is the result of the idea of chair in his mind, the created chair is once (...)
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  9. Myths of Complexity.Claudia Westermann - 2011 - Design Ecologies 1 (2):267-284.
    The following article takes up a dialogue that was initiated in the first issue of Design Ecologies, evolving in relation to questions of design within a context of concepts of complexity. As the first part of the article shows, this process of taking up a dialogue – through reading and writing – can be considered a question of design. This is elaborated alongside de Certeau’s concepts of ‘tactics’ and ‘strategies’. Further, in relation to questions emerging from the previous issue of (...)
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  10. Resonances of the Unknown.Claudia Westermann - 2011 - Kybernetes 40 (7/8):1189-1195.
    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to discuss the relevance of second-order cybernetics for a theory of architectural design and related discourse. -/- Design/methodology/approach – First, the relation of architectural design to the concept of “poiesis” is clarified. Subsequently, selected findings of Gotthard Günther are revisited and related to an architectural poetics. The last part of the paper consists of revisiting ideas mentioned previously, however, on the level of a discourse that has incorporated the ideas and offers a (...)
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  11. Critica, tendencia y propaganda. Textos sobre arte y comunismo 1917-1954.Juan José Gómez Gutiérrez - 2008 - Sevilla, España: ISTPART Doble J.
    Esta historia de la relación entre arte y comunismo a través de los escritos de sus principales exponentes abarca el periodo comprendido entre la Revolución de Octubre y el fin del estalinismo e incluye una amplia selección de escritos teóricos, directivas políticas, manifiestos, etc., muchos de ellos inéditos hasta ahora en castellano. El volumen comienza con ejemplos de la relación entre las vanguardias artísticas y el Partido Comunista; continúa con las diferentes formulaciones de la cultura socialista ante la estabilización del (...)
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  12. The PCI Artists. Antifascism and Communism in Italian Art. 1944-1953.Juan José Gómez Gutiérrez - 2015 - Newcastle upon Tyne, Reino Unido: Cambridge Scholars Publishers.
    This book examines the artistic policies of the Italian Communist Party (PCI) during the early post-war years (1944-1951), after the defeat of Fascism in Europe and the outbreak of the Cold War. It brings together theoretical debates on artists’ political engagement and an extensive critical apparatus, providing the reader with an historical framework for wider reflections on the relationship between art and politics.
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  13. Batallas culturales en torno al clasicismo.Juan José Gómez Gutiérrez - 2008 - Fragmentos de Filosofía 6 (6):115-142.
    Los valores fascistas calaron, de un modo u otro, en todas las manifestaciones del arte italiano de entreguerras. Sin embargo, no todas las manifestaciones del arte fascista fueron el resultado de nacionalismo exacerbado, provincialismo y aislacionismo. Los conceptos de ‘romanità’, ‘italianità’, ‘latinità, o ‘mediterraneità’, que caracterizaban la producción cultural italiana de esos años, actuaron originalmente como matriz de estilos diferentes y susceptibles de diversas interpretaciones.
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  14. The Politics of Abstract Art. Forma 1 and the Italian Communist Party.Juan José Gómez Gutiérrez - 2012 - Cercles. Revista D’Història Cultural 15 (15):111-135.
    Este artículo examina el papel del grupo de artistas abstractos Forma 1 en relación con la política cultural del Partido Comunista Italiano durante la posguerra, como ejemplo de los intentos de superar la dicotomía establecida en Italia entre arte abstracto y realismo socialista y producir una alternativa a la confrontación entre ambos discursos estéticos. Mientras los artistas realistas socialistas subrayaban la necesidad de expresar contenidos políticos explícitos con un estilo que asegurase su máxima legibilidad para una audiencia de masas, los (...)
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  15. Picasso en Italia, 1936-1948. Del Guernica al arte socialista.Juan José Gómez Gutiérrez - 2016 - Goya 356 (356):252-263.
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  16. Políticas del urbanismo lúdico. Contracultura y ciudad del situacionismo al neohistoricismo (1943-1989).Juan José Gómez Gutiérrez - 2017 - Arquitectura, Ciudad y Entorno 12 (35):121-136.
    Este artículo ofrece una introducción histórica a la teoría y la práctica situacionista en conexión con la arquitectura funcionalista, las economías urbanas, ejemplos de acción política contracultural y su reincorporación a las lógicas de organización tecnocrática de las ciudades. Ello permite definir, desde una perspectiva histórica, algunas claves interpretativas de los rasgos ideológicos y económicos fundamentales de los sistemas urbanos contemporáneos, lo cual, a su vez puede establecer un contexto desde el que reflexionar sobre las posibilidades actuales de un urbanismo (...)
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  17. D'une graphie qui ne dit rien. Les ambiguïtés de la notation chorégraphique.Frédéric Pouillaude - 2004 - Poetique 1 (137):99-123.
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  18. Games: Agency as Art.C. Thi Nguyen - forthcoming - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Games occupy a unique and valuable place in our lives. Game designers do not simply create worlds; they design temporary selves. Game designers set what our motivations are in the game and what our abilities will be. Thus: games are the art form of agency. By working in the artistic medium of agency, games can offer a distinctive aesthetic value. They support aesthetic experiences of deciding and doing. -/- And the fact that we play games shows something remarkable about us. (...)
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  19. The Aesthetic and Cognitive Value of Surprise.Alexandre Declos - 2014 - Proceedings of the European Society for Aesthetics 6:52-69.
    It is a common experience to be surprised by an artwork. In this paper, I examine how and why this obvious fact matters for philosophical aesthetics. Following recent works in psychology and philosophers such as Davidson or Scheffler, we will see that surprise qualifies as an emotion of a special kind, essentially “cognitive” or “epistemic” in its nature and functioning. After some preliminary considerations, I wish to hold two general claims: the first one will be that surprise is somehow related (...)
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  20. Beardsley on Literature, Fiction, and Nonfiction.Szu-Yen Lin - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Culture 8 (1).
    This paper attempts to revive interest in the speech act theory of literature by looking into Monroe C. Beardsley's account in particular. Beardsley's view in this respect has received, surprisingly, less attention than deserved. I first offer a reconstruction of Beardsley's account and then use it to correct some notable misconceptions. Next, I show that the reformulation reveals a hitherto unnoticed discrepancy in Beardsley's position and that this can be explained away by a weak version of intentionalism that Beardsley himself (...)
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  21. Decadence & Aesthetics.Sacha Golob - forthcoming - In Desmarais & Weir (eds.), Decadence. Cambridge University Press.
    he relationship between decadence and aesthetics is an intimate and complex one. Both the stock figure of the aesthete and the aestheticism of ‘art for art’s sake’ are classic decadent tropes with obvious sources in figures such as Théophile Gautier, Walter Pater, Joris-Karl Huysmans. Yet the links between aesthetics and decadence are more conflicted than might first appear: historically, aesthetics has served both as a site for the theorisation of decadence and as the basis of an attempt to stem it. (...)
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  22. Fake Views—or Why Concepts Are Bad Guides to Art’s Ontology.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (2):193-207.
    It is often thought that the boundaries and properties of art-kinds are determined by the things we say and think about them. More recently, this tendency has manifested itself as concept-descriptivism, the view that the reference of art-kind terms is fixed by the ontological properties explicitly or implicitly ascribed to art and art-kinds by competent users of those terms. Competent users are therefore immune from radical error in their ascriptions; the result is that the ontology of art must begin and (...)
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  23. Machine Art or Machine Artists? Dennett, Danto, and the Expressive Stance.Adam Linson - 2016 - In Vincent Müller (ed.), Fundamental Issues of Artificial Intelligence (Synthese Library). Berlin: Springer. pp. 441-456.
    As art produced by autonomous machines becomes increasingly common, and as such machines grow increasingly sophisticated, we risk a confusion between art produced by a person but mediated by a machine, and art produced by what might be legitimately considered a machine artist. This distinction will be examined here. In particular, my argument seeks to close a gap between, on one hand, a philosophically grounded theory of art and, on the other hand, theories concerned with behavior, intentionality, expression, and creativity (...)
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  24. Appearance and History: The Autographic/Allographic Distinction Revisited.Enrico Terrone - 2018 - British Journal of Aesthetics 58 (1):71-87.
    Nelson Goodman notoriously distinguished between autographic works, whose instances should be identified by taking history of production into account, and allographic works, whose instances can be identified independently of history of production. Scholars such as Jerrold Levinson, Flint Schier, and Gregory Currie have criticized Goodman’s autographic/allographic distinction arguing that all works are such that their instances should be identified by taking history of production into account. I will address this objection by exploiting David Davies’ distinction between e-instances and p-instances of (...)
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  25. CPHL504 Philosophy of Art I Photocopy Packet (Edited by V.I. Burke).Victoria I. Burke (ed.) - 2014 - Toronto, anada: Ryerson University.
    This collection of writings on aesthetics includes selections from Theodor Adorno, Walter Benjamin, Mikhail Bakhtin, Sigmund Freud, Martin Heidegger, Amy Mullin, Friedrich Nietzsche, and Frederich Wilhelm Joseph von Schelling. This collection may still be available as a print-on-demand title at the Ryerson University bookstore.
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  26. PHIL4230 Photocopy Packet Surrealism (Edited by V.I. Burke).Victoria I. Burke (ed.) - 2011 - Guelph: University of Guelph.
    This out-of-print, two-volume, photocopy packet, in the area of "Surrealism and the Politics of the Particular" includes readings on language, meaning, and surrealism from Adorno, Benjamin, McCumber, Breton, Heidegger, Freud, Kristeva, Ricouer, and Bataille.
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  27. The Aesthetic Creation Theory of Art.Rafael De Clercq - 2009 - Sztuka I Filozofia (Art and Philosophy) 35:20-24.
    This is a critical discussion of Nick Zangwill’s Aesthetic Creation Theory of Art, as he has presented the theory in his book Aesthetic Creation. The discussion focuses on two questions: first, whether the notion of art implied by Zangwill’s theory is at once too wide and too narrow; second, whether Zangwill is right about the persistence conditions of works of art.
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  28. Ugo Nespolo: a proposito di rappresentazioni.Elisa Caldarola - 2015 - Rivista di Estetica 58.
    An analysis of three pictorial works by Ugo Nespolo is put forward: "Barbe posticce" (1977); "Guardar Manzoni" (1974); "Il museo: Fontana" (1975). It is claimed that such works embody meditations on the concept and the varieties of representation, that they prompt critical reflections on the role of museums in art-making, and that they suggest an alternative route to that of the 'dematerialization' of the art object for the understanding of contemporary art.
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Artworks
  1. A Self-Critical Phenomenology of Criticism. [REVIEW]Joshua M. Hall - 2014 - Dance Chronicle 37:122-128.
    Noel Carroll, a central figure in analytic (Anglo-American) philosophy of art, and spouse of renowned dance scholar Sally Banes (who co-authored several of these essays), offers us something remarkable in his new book—namely, a collection of thirty years of his theoretical essays and dance reviews. Carroll wrote some of the pieces while he was a graduate student at the University of Illinois, Chicago, and there have been some dramatic changes since then in both the art world and Carroll’s philosophical views. (...)
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  2. The Right Way to Play a Game.C. Thi Nguyen - 2019 - Game Studies 19 (1).
    Is there a right or wrong way to play a game? Many think not. Some have argued that, when we insist that players obey the rules of a game, we give too much weight to the author’s intent. Others have argued that such obedience to the rules violates the true purpose of games, which is fostering free and creative play. Both of these responses, I argue, misunderstand the nature of games and their rules. The rules do not tell us how (...)
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  3. The Ancient Quarrel Between Art and Philosophy in Contemporary Exhibitions of Visual Art.Jennifer A. McMahon - 2019 - Curator: The Museum Journal 62 (1):7-17.
    At a time when professional art criticism is on the wane, the ancient quarrel between art and philosophy demands fresh answers. Professional art criticism provided a basis upon which to distinguish apt experiences of art from the idiosyncratic. However, currently the kind of narratives from which critics once drew are underplayed or discarded in contemporary exhibition design where the visual arts are concerned. This leaves open the possibility that art operates either as mere stimulant to private reverie or, in the (...)
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  4. Once Removed: The Nature of Representation.Tanya Kelley - manuscript
    James Prosek paints flora and fauna, but first became known for his paintings of trout. This essay situates Prosek's paintings, especially those at the Lowe Museum exhibit, within the long tradition of the depiction of nature. The essay comments on the relationship between the representation of nature and the nature of representation.
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  5. Bill Viola’s 'Nantes Triptych': Unearthing the Sources of its Condensed Temporality.Carlos Vara Sánchez - 2014 - Aniki: Portuguese Journal of the Moving Image 2 (1):35-48.
    In this text we intend to analyze Bill Viola’s video installation Nantes Triptych (1992) as an example of the richness which lies in the liminal spaces between arts. We defend the thesis that the utilization of the traditional pictorial structure of the triptych in this particular work, along with the powerful audiovisual material, renders a kairological event available to the viewer. This temporal experience makes possible an existential experience when in front of this video installation. To discuss this assumption we (...)
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  6. A New Conception of 'Art'.Jakob Zaaiman - 2018
    The traditional conception of art is about sensual beauty and refined taste; modern art on the other hand has introduced an entirely unexpected dimension to the visual arts, namely that of ‘revelatory narrative’. Classical art aspires to present works which can be appreciated as sensually beautiful; modern art, when it succeeds, presents us instead with the unsettling narrative. This radical difference in artistic purpose is something relatively new, and not yet fully appreciated or understood.
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  7. Commentary on Zeki Inner Vision. [REVIEW]Jennifer A. McMahon - 2000 - Leonardo Reviews On-Line:N/A.
    The late vision theorist David Marr identified three levels of explanation that he argued needed to be addressed in order to understand vision : (i) the psychological, functional or computational level of processes; (ii) the physical or neurological which is the level of explanation employed by Zeki; and (iii) the algorithmic – the level of implementation. For Zeki’s purpose of drawing upon vision-theory in order to better understand art and aesthetics, there is no need to focus on the third level. (...)
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  8. The Substitution Principle Revisited.Jakub Stejskal - 2018 - Source: Notes in the History of Art 37 (3):150-157.
    In their Anachronic Renaissance, Alexander Nagel and Christopher Wood identify two principles upon which, in fifteenth-century Europe, a work of art might establish its validity or authority: substitution and performance. It has become established wisdom that the dual schema of substitution and performance follows Hans Belting's dualism of the medieval cult of the image and the modern aesthetic system of art. This, I submit, is not just a mistake, but also prevents from evaluating one of the book's most ambitious contributions (...)
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  9. Ante la fragilidad de la memoria.Carlos Vanegas, Javier Domínguez, Carlos Arturo Fernández & Daniel Tobón - 2014 - In Carlos Vanegas, Javier Domínguez, Carlos Arturo Fernández & Daniel Tobón (eds.), El arte y la Fragilidad de la memoria. Medellín, Colombia: Sílaba Editores. pp. 259-275.
    Si no me falla la memoria, fue el dibujante Álvaro Barrios quien afirmó que el trabajo del artista contemporáneo colombiano se desarrolla según una agenda de trabajo. Si miramos algunos fenómenos del arte último en Colombia, podemos señalar que su agenda está determinada por el intento de comprensión de los procesos de la violencia en el país, a partir de una amplia gama de aproximaciones al concepto de memoria que ha tenido resonancia en las disciplinas humanísticas, las investigaciones académicas, el (...)
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  10. Yosman Botero y Postcolombino.Carlos Vanegas - 2016 - Co-herencia:301-303.
    La obra de Yosman Botero siempre ha orbitado entre paradojas. Desde los mismos lugares suplementarios de su obra, como los títulos de sus series Full of Emptiness (2013), Immaterial matter (2014) y Postcolombino (2016) se plantea una encrucijada tanto de la “supervivencia de las imágenes” del arte como de su capacidad comunicativa de la realidad: ya sea esta la experiencia del arte o la realidad social colombiana, o lo que sea que entendemos por “lo real”, tan cara a las propuestas (...)
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  11. Editors' Introduction.Jussi Backman, Harri Mäcklin & Raine Vasquez - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 4 (2):93-99.
    A brief overview of the current status of the scholarship on Heidegger and contemporary art and of the contributions included in the special issue.
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  12. Why Do We Need to Define ‘Art’ ? Because It Greatly Enhances the Encounter with Art Itself.Jakob Zaaiman - 2017 - Alldaynight.Info.
    Modern art has yet to be properly explained and given its own distinctive and authentic philosophy. It is almost always portrayed – openly or subliminally – as if it were somehow striving for much the same objectives as classical art, though perhaps by very different means. This has the effect of making modern artworks look slightly ridiculous in comparison with the grandeur of their classical counterparts, at the same time as making it an uphill struggle to try to argue the (...)
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  13. In Monstrous Shallows: Pinpointing Where the Real Art of Jeff Koons Lies.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    Art is about the exploration of the strange and disturbing; it is not about classical fine crafting. Artists use artworks to exteriorise their inner landscapes, thereby allowing others to experience their take on life, at least vicariously. It is this exteriorisation which is ‘art’, not the aesthetic features of the individual artworks themselves, which is properly the domain of crafting and design. Aesthetics cannot explain the work of many major modern contemporary artists, because it fails to locate the underlying unifying (...)
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  14. Understanding Art: A Checklist of the Three Most Basic Categories of Crafted Material.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    One of the difficulties standing in the way of a straightforward understanding of art is caused by the confusion that arises at a very basic level between the purposes and functions of various types of crafted material. In fact, there are only three major types – covering all eventualities – and being able to differentiate between them very much helps to pinpoint exactly what the special nature of ‘art’ is.
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  15. ‘But is It Art ?’ The Search for a Simple, Practical and Illuminating Answer.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    ‘Art’ still needs a practical, useful definition, not of the academic variety, but rather of the plain and simple sort that you can usefully take with you into a gallery, and apply directly to what you see. People want to know, with a basic clarity, what it is they are looking at, and how to judge the good from the bad. Because if you don’t know what ‘art’ is, and you think it’s all about ‘classical fine crafting’, then you are (...)
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  16. Review of The Lost Carving: A Journey Into the Heart of Making, by David Esterly (Viking: New York, 2012). [REVIEW]Stefanie Rocknak - 2013 - Popular Woodworking Magazine 1.
    In 1986, David Esterly won a competition to carve a replacement of a Grinling Gibbons “wall drop” for Hampten Court Palace, in East Molesey, England. His task was an onerous one: Gibbons invented a style of carving that has been matched by few, and surpassed by still fewer. Esterly is one of the latter few; his technique is superb. -/- The Lost Carving gives us an account of those fateful days at Hampton Court. Interwoven with memories of recreating the Gibbon’s (...)
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  17. On Creatively Destructing.Konstantina Kalfa - 2014 - Rethinking Marxism 26 (4):581-591.
    Capitalism—as Marx has shown and Schumpeter has reminded us—has always promoted creative destruction practices. What in fact helps capitalism survive is the constant renewal of its products, modes of production, and needs through its own self-destructiveness. Capitalist destruction is a clearing out, a maneuver, a revaluation, and the presupposition for creation, all at once. It is a unification, the embracing of multiple and seemingly incompatible activities whose common component mainly consists in positivity: in their ability to reverse, to beautify destruction (...)
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  18. Facing Death; The Desperate at its Most Beautiful.Stefanie Rocknak - 2005 - Phenomenological Inquiry, A Review of Philosophical Ideas and Trends 29:71-101.
    Is there a distinction between “art” and “craft,” where the former is motivated by something like “genuine” or “authentic” creativity and the latter by, at best, skill and skill alone, and at a worst, a fumbling attempt to fit in with popular modes of expression? In this paper, I suggest that there does seem to be such a distinction. In particular, I attempt to show that genuine creativity, and so, genuine art—in varying respects—is motivated by a certain recognition of what (...)
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  19. Review of Beauty Unlimited, Peg Zeglin Brand, Ed. [REVIEW]Stefanie Rocknak - 2015 - Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 15 (1):14-16.
    Most artists who are familiar with the contemporary art scene—especially the New York City scene—know that “beauty” is not especially hip. Unless, that is, it serves a “deeper” purpose, e.g., it helps to make a conceptual or political point. Danto’s influence, it would seem, pervades and persists (31). But, as Brand points out in her introduction, in the past twenty years or so, the philosophical study of beauty has been making a comeback; she lists over fifty titles that have been (...)
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  20. How to Understand Modern Contemporary Art, Enjoy It, and Not Be Fooled.Jakob Zaaiman - 2016 - Alldaynight.Info.
    Modern contemporary art remains a mystery because most people – including art critics and even artists themselves – are unable to see beyond the imprisoning confines of classical fine art. Everything is judged in terms of beauty and technical skill, when it should be viewed from a quite different perspective, namely that of the imaginative world that the modern artwork is a part of. Successful and authentic modern art is about creating worlds of the imagination - like a film, or (...)
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  21. What is Temporal Art? A Persistent Question Revisited.John Powell - 2015 - Contemporary Aesthetics 13:1-1.
    This article examines the fourteen conditions constituting Levinson and Alperson’s taxonomy of conditions for temporal arts. It claims that some of the conditions and several of the lists of arts exemplifying them need revision. It recommends adding a new condition concerned with the effects of the passage of time on gardens, environmental sculpture, and outdoor installations. The article concludes that gardens may be a model for understanding and appreciating other arts sharing the same bi-(multi-) modality.
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  22. Artwork Completion: A Response to Gover.Kelly Trogdon & Paisley Nathan Livingston - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):460-462.
    Response to Gover (2015) on Trogdon and Livingston (2015) on artwork completion.
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