View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

33 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
Material to categorize
  1. Eamonn Butler, Public Choice: A Primer London: Institute of Economic Affairs, 2012.Gary James Jason - 2013 - Philosophia 41 (3):917-922.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Reid’s View of Memorial Conception.Marina Folescu - 2018 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 16 (3):211-226.
    Thomas Reid believed that the human mind is well equipped, from infancy, to acquire knowledge of the external world, with all its objects, persons and events. There are three main faculties that are involved in the acquisition of knowledge: (original) perception, memory, and imagination. It is thought that we cannot understand how exactly perception works, unless we have a good grasp on Reid’s notion of perceptual conception (i.e., of the conception employed in perception). The present paper argues that the same (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Bagimsiz Yasam Istegi.Hasan Bulent Paksoy - 2012 - Florence: Carrie/European University Institute.
    Universite’nin gorevi nedir? Su tanim’i yapabiliriz: dusunceleri birlestirip,ilerletmek. Dusunceleri birlestirmek ve ilerletmek neden gereklidir? Bir atilim’a gecmek icin, yer alacak olaylarin onceden ve kapsamli olarakdusunulmesi gerekir. Dusunceler, bir atilimin baslangicidir ve yalniz universite icinde gelismez.Dusunceler bir yonetim'e katilim birimi icinde gelkisebilecegi gibi, arkadastopluluklari icinde de yer alabilir. Ayrica, bir tek kisi'ce de olusturulup birkitap icinde dunya'ya sunulabilir.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Hagia Sophia.Wolf Leslau, C. F. Beckingham & G. W. B. Huntingford - manuscript
    Three separate churches erected in Constantinople were all dedicated to the wisdom of Christ and erected on the same site one after the other. These churches were built between 360 and 537 AD by three different emperors: Constantius II, Theodosius the Younger, and Justinian I. The first two churches were consumed in flames after relatively short lives, but the final and greatest church still stands today, despite a history of extensive damage. This final edifice is the main focus of this (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Re-Evaluating Reid's Response to Skepticism.Blake McAllister - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (3):317-339.
    I argue that some of the most prominent interpretations of Reid's response to skepticism marginalize a crucial aspect of his thought: namely, that our common sense beliefs meet whatever normative standards of rationality the skeptic might fairly demand of them. This should be seen as supplementary to reliabilist or proper functionalist interpretations of Reid, which often ignore this half of the story. I also show how Reid defends the rationality of believing first principles by appealing to their naturalness and irresistibility. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Thomas Reid on Causation and Scientific Explanation.Manuel Barrantes & Juan Manuel Durán - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):51-67.
    We argue that there is no tension between Reid's description of science and his claim that science is based on the principles of common sense. For Reid, science is rooted in common sense since it is based on the idea that fixed laws govern nature. This, however, does not contradict his view that the scientific notions of causation and explanation are fundamentally different from their common sense counterparts. After discussing these points, we dispute with Cobb's and Benbaji's interpretations of Reid's (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Hutcheson's Theological Objection to Egoism.John J. Tilley - 2016 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 14 (1):101-123.
    Francis Hutcheson's objections to psychological egoism usually appeal to experience or introspection. However, at least one of them is theological: It includes premises of a religious kind, such as that God rewards the virtuous. This objection invites interpretive and philosophical questions, some of which may seem to highlight errors or shortcomings on Hutcheson's part. Also, to answer the questions is to point out important features of Hutcheson's objection and its intellectual context. And nowhere in the scholarship on Hutcheson do we (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. De Morgan on Euclid’s Fourth Postulate.John Corcoran & Sriram Nambiar - 2014 - Bulletin of Symbolic Logic 20 (2):250-1.
    This paper will annoy modern logicians who follow Bertrand Russell in taking pleasure in denigrating Aristotle for [allegedly] being ignorant of relational propositions. To be sure this paper does not clear Aristotle of the charge. On the contrary, it shows that such ignorance, which seems unforgivable in the current century, still dominated the thinking of one of the greatest modern logicians as late as 1831. Today it is difficult to accept the proposition that Aristotle was blind to the fact that, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. D.M. Armstrong And Norman Malcolm, Consciousness And Causality. [REVIEW]Karl Pfeifer - 1985 - Philosophy in Review 5:279-281.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Knowledge, Morality and Politics.V. I. Part - 2002 - In G. N. Kitching & Nigel Pleasants (eds.), Marx and Wittgenstein: Knowledge, Morality and Politics. Routledge. pp. 35--229.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Predecessors of Classical Utilitarianism.V. Gluchman - 1995 - Filozofia 50 (2):114-122.
    An outline of the historical development of ideas of utility and consequences in the history of ethics in the 18th century.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Language of Publication of "Analytic" Philosophy.Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra - 2013 - Critica 45 (133):83-90.
    This note argues that research in analytical philosophy broadly conceived should be published exclusively in English. Reasons are given for this and the thesis is defended against thirteen objections.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  13. Russellowska krytyka argumentów na rzecz istnienia Boga.Natalia Marcinowska - 2012 - Filo-Sofija 12 (19).
    Bertrand Russell’s Critique of the Arguments for the Existence of God The paper presents Bertrand Russell’s critique of arguments for the existence of God. I divided the theistic arguments which Russell criticizes into three groups. The first group involves arguments concerning the relation between Universe and God: the First Cause argument, the Natural law argument and the argument from Design. The second group is related to the concept of God as a moral Lawmaker and it contains the argument from morality (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Natural Law Theories in the Early Enlightenment. [REVIEW]Greg Janzen - 2002 - History of Intellectual Culture 2 (1).
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Letter From Otago.Charles Pigden - 2011 - The Philosophers' Magazine 53 (53):52-54.
    Short article on the history of the Otago Department.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. An Essay on Man.Robert Pollock - 1946 - Thought: Fordham University Quarterly 21 (2):336-338.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. An Essay on Man.Rudolf Allers - 1945 - New Scholasticism 19 (3):263-265.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. The Technology of Metaphor.Martin A. Coleman - 2000 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 38 (3):379-392.
    According to Larry Hickman, John Dewey’s general philosophical project of analyzing and critiquing human experience may be understood in terms of technological inquiry (Hickman 1990, 1). Following this, I contend that technology provides a model for Dewey’s analysis of language and meaning, and this analysis suggests a treatment of linguistic metaphor as a way of meeting new demands of experience with old tools of a known and understood language. An account of metaphor consistent with Dewey’s views on language and meaning (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Review: Stephen Boulter: The Rediscovery of Common Sense Philosophy. [REVIEW]C. Preti - 2009 - Mind 118 (470):445-448.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Preface.Lorenzo Magnani & Nancy J. Nersessian - 2001 - Mind and Society 2 (2):29-32.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Acta Cum Fundamentis in Re.Barry Smith - 1984 - Dialectica 38 (2‐3):157-178.
    It will be the thesis of this paper that there are among our mental acts some which fall into the category of real material relations. That is: some acts are necessarily such as to involve a plurality of objects as their relata or fundamenta. Suppose Bruno walks into his study and sees a cat. To describe the seeing, here, as a relation, is to affirm that it serves somehow to tie Bruno to the cat. Bruno's act of seeing, unlike his (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  1. Samuel Alexander's Early Reactions to British Idealism.A. R. J. Fisher - 2017 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 23 (2):169-196.
    Samuel Alexander was a central figure of the new wave of realism that swept across the English-speaking world in the early twentieth century. His Space, Time, and Deity (1920a, 1920b) was taken to be the official statement of realism as a metaphysical system. But many historians of philosophy are quick to point out the idealist streak in Alexander’s thought. After all, as a student he was trained at Oxford in the late 1870s and early 1880s as British Idealism was beginning (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Against Adversarial Discussion.Maarten Steenhagen - 2016 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 22 (1):87-112.
    Why did R.G. Collingwood come to reject the adversarial style of philosophical discussion so popular among his Oxford peers? The main aim of this paper is to explain that Collingwood came to reject his colleagues’ specific style of philosophical dialogue on methodological grounds, and to show how the argument against adversarial philosophical discussion is integrated with Collingwood’s overall criticism of realist philosophy. His argument exploits a connection between method and practice that should be taken seriously even today.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Was Berkeley a Subjective Idealist?G. Callahan - 2015 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 21 (2):157-184.
    Subjective idealism can be defined as the view that ‘the objective world independent of man does not exist; it is the product of man's subjective cognitive abilities, sensations, and perceptions’. George Berkeley often is said to be the founder of this species of idealism, and when someone wants to offer an example of a subjective idealist, Berkeley is usually the first person who comes to mind. However, those making this claim largely seem to be only passingly familiar with Berkeley’s work, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. After Macintyre: Critical Perspectives on the Work of Alasdair Macintyre.John Horton & Susan Mendus (eds.) - 1994 - University of Notre Dame Press.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Mario Ricciardi, Diritto e natura. H.L.A. Hart e la filosofia di Oxford. [REVIEW]Lorenzo Greco - 2009 - Mondoperaio 8:89-91.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Barber, Russell's Paradox, Catch-22, God, Contradiction, and More.Laurence Goldstein - 2004 - In Graham Priest, J. C. Beall & Bradley Armour-Garb (eds.), The Law of Non-Contradiction. Clarendon Press. pp. 295--313.
    outrageous remarks about contradictions. Perhaps the most striking remark he makes is that they are not false. This claim first appears in his early notebooks (Wittgenstein 1960, p.108). In the Tractatus, Wittgenstein argued that contradictions (like tautologies) are not statements (Sätze) and hence are not false (or true). This is a consequence of his theory that genuine statements are pictures.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  7. Ideal Types and the Historical Method.Gene Callahan - 2007 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 13 (1):53-68.
    A number of social theorists have contended that the essence of historical analysis is the employment of ideal types to comprehend past goings-on. But, while acknowledging that the study of history through ideal types can yield genuine insight, we may still ask if it represents the full emancipation of historical understanding from other modes of conceiving the past. This paper follows Michael Oakeshott's work on the philosophy of history in arguing that explaining the historical past by means of ideal types, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Community and Terror (The Lesson of All Sorrow).Maurice F. Stanley - 2005 - Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 11 (2):27-40.
    Every idealist believes himself to have rational grounds for the faith that somewhere, and in some world, and at some time, the ideal will triumph, so that a survey, a divine synopsis of all time, somehow reveals the lesson of all sorrow, the meaning of all tragedy, the triumph of the spirit. But it is not ours to say, in the world in which we at present have to live from one day to another, and to follow the fortunes of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Doing Philosophy with Words.Brian Weatherson - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (3):429 - 437.
    This paper discusses the coverage of ordinary language philosophy in Scott Soames' Philosophical Analysis in the Twentieth Century. After praising the book's virtues, I raise three points where I dissent from Soames' take on the history. First, I suggest that there is more to ordinary language philosophy than the rather implausible version of it that Soames sees to have been destroyed by Grice. Second, I argue that confusions between analyticity, necessity and priority are less important to the ordinary language period (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
20th Century British Philosophy, Misc
  1. On Flew’s Compatibilism and His Objections to Theistic Libertarianism.Hakan Gundogdu - 2015 - Kaygı Uludağ University Faculty of Arts and Sciences Journal of Philosophy 25:115-142.
    Flew strongly defends a compatibilist thesis in the free will debate before going on to totally object to theistic libertarianism. His objections basically rely on his compatibilism embracing the notion of agent causation, which is not very common in compatibilist theses. Since he is a strong proponent of ordinary language philosophy, he also holds that linguistic analyses can certainly solve the free will problem as well as many other problems of philosophy. In doing so, he first uses the paradigm cases (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. A Survey of British Epistemology.Ray Scott Percival - 2006 - In Anthony Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.), Continuum Encyclopaedia of British Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum. pp. 999-1007.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
British Philosophy, Misc
  1. A Survey of British Epistemology.Ray Scott Percival - 2006 - In Anthony Grayling, Andrew Pyle & Naomi Goulder (eds.), Continuum Encyclopaedia of British Philosophy. Thoemmes Continuum. pp. 999-1007.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark