View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

84 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
1 — 50 / 84
Material to categorize
  1. Xopóσ: Dancing Into the Sacred Space of Chora: An Inquiry Into the Choir of Dance From the Chora.Nicoletta Isar - 2005 - Byzantion 75:199-224.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Simone de Beauvoir
  1. Il concetto di eros in Le deuxième sexe di Simone de Beauvoir.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1976 - In V. Melchiorre (ed.), Amore e matrimonio nel pensiero filosofico e teologico moderno. MIlano, Italy: Vita e Pensiero. pp. 296-318..
    The most original discovery in Beauvoir’s book is one more Columbus’s egg, namely that it is far from obvious that a woman is a woman. That is, her discovery is that a woman is the result of a process that made so that she is like she is. The paper discusses two aspects of the, so-to-say ‘ideology’ inspiring the work. The first is its ideology in the proper, Marxian, sense. My claim is that the work still pays a heavy price (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Marxismo e psicanalisi in 'Il secondo sesso' di Simone de Beauvoir.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1975 - Vita E Pensiero 61 (3-4):510-526.
    The paper reconstructs Beauvoir's interpretation of the Marxist and the Freudian contributions to our understanding of the feminine condition. A number of epistemological assumptions derived from Sartre's philosophy are pointed out. Beauvoir's reading of Marx, Engels, and Freud is discussed claiming that her reading is biased by humanistic and historicist assumptions.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. The Aesthetic Attitude in the Ethics of Ambiguity.Peg Zeglin Brand - 2001-2002 - Simone de Beauvoir Studies 18:31-48.
    This essay aims to address a lack of recognition on the part of aestheticians, feminist scholars in the visual arts, as well as Simone de Beauvoir scholars by studying Beauvoir's The Ethics of Ambiguity (1948) for what it has to offer on the topic of art and aesthetics: (1) the important role of the visual arts in society and the political legacy artists can contribute to the world; (2) the traditionally revered philosophical concept of the aesthetic attitude; and (30 the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Erotico-Theoretical Transference Relationship Between Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir Revisited with Michèle Le Dœuff.Ruth Burch - 2016 - Existenz 11 (1):57-62.
    Michèle Le Dœuff considers the relationship between Jean-Paul Sartre and Simone de Beauvoir as a paradigmatic case of what she calls an "erotico-theoretical transference" relationship: De Beauvoir devoted herself to Sartre theoretically by adopting his existentialist perspective for the analysis of reality in general and the analysis of women's oppression in particular. The latter is especially strange since Sartre used strongly sexist metaphors and adopted a macho attitude towards women. In her book Hipparchia's Choice, Le Dœuff speaks in this context (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Varieties of Consciousness Under Oppression: False Consciousness, Bad Faith, Double Consciousness, and Se Faire Objet.Jennifer McWeeny - 2016 - In S. West Gurley & Geoff Pfeifer (eds.), Phenomenology and the Political. Palgrave MacMillan. pp. 149-63.
    What it would mean for phenomenology to move in an ontological direction that would render its relevance to contemporary political movement less ambiguous while at the same time retaining those aspects of its method that are epistemologically and politically advantageous? The present study crafts the beginnings of a response to this question by examining four configurations of consciousness that seem to be respectively tied to certain oppressive contexts and certain kinds of oppressed bodies: 1. false consciousness, 2. bad faith, 3. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Lived Experience of Doubling: Simone de Beauvoir's Phenomenology of Old Age.Sarah Clark Miller - 2001 - In Wendy O'Brien & Lester Embree (eds.), The Existential Phenomenology of Simone de Beauvoir. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 127-147.
    This essay demonstrates that Beauvoir's La Vieillesse is a phenomenological study of old age indebted to Husserl's phenomenology of the body. Beauvoir's depiction of the doubling in the lived experience of the elderly--a division between outsiders' awareness of the elderly's decline and the elderly's own inner understanding of old age--serves as a specific illustration of Beauvoir's particular method of description and analysis.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics.Tove Pettersen - 2015 - In Tove Pettersen Annlaug Bjørsnøs (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir – A Humanist Thinker. Brill/Rodopi. pp. 69-91.
    In "Existential Humanism and Moral Freedom in Simone de Beauvoir's Ethics" Tove Pettersen elucidates the close connection between Beauvoir’s ethics and humanism, and argues that her humanism is an existential humanism. Beauvoir’s concept of freedom is inspected, followed by a discussion of her reasons for making moral freedom the leading normative value, and her claim that we must act for humanity. In Beauvoir’s ethics, freedom is not reserved for the elite, but understood as everyone being “able to surpass the given (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. An Existentialist Account of the Role of Humor Against Oppression.Chris A. Kramer - 2013 - Humor: International Journal of Humor Research 26 (4).
    I argue that the overt subjugation in the system of American slavery and its subsequent effects offer a case study for an existentialist analysis of freedom, oppression and humor. Concentrating on the writings and experiences of Frederick Douglass and the existentialists Simone De Beauvoir and Lewis Gordon, I investigate how the concepts of “spirit of seriousness”, “mystification”, and an existentialist reading of “double consciousness” for example, can elucidate the forms of explicit and concealed oppression. I then make the case that (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Subversive Humor.Chris A. Kramer - 2015 - Dissertation, Marquette
    Oppression is easily recognized. That is, at least, when oppression results from overt, consciously professed racism, for example, in which violence, explicit exclusion from economic opportunities, denial of adequate legal access, and open discrimination perpetuate the subjugation of a group of people. There are relatively clear legal remedies to such oppression. But this is not the case with covert oppression where the psychological harms and resulting legal and economic exclusion are every bit as real, but caused by concealed mechanisms subtly (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. “An Equivocal Couple Overwhelmed by Life”: A Phenomenological Analysis of Pregnancy.Sara Heinämaa - 2014 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 4 (1):12-49.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  11. Transformations of Old Age: Selfhood, Normativity, and Time.Sara Heinämaa - 2014 - In Silvia Stoller (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir’s Philosophy of Age: Gender, Ethics. Indiana University Press. pp. 167-87.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Commentary. Beauvoir and Sartre: The Problem of the Other; Corrected Notes.Edward Fullbrook & Margaret A. Simons - 2009 - In An Unconventional History of Western Philosophy. pp. 509-523.
    Simone de Beauvoir and Jean-Paul Sartre struggled for the whole of their philosophical careers against one of modern Western philosophy's most pervasive concepts, the Cartesian notion of self. A notion of self is always a complex of ideas; in the case of Beauvoir and Sartre it includes the ideas of embodiment, temporality, the Other, and intersubjectivity. This essay will show the considerable part that gender, especially Beauvoir's position as a woman in twentieth-century France, played in the development, presentation and reception (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Moralsk frihet og situasjon: Simone de Beauvoir.Pettersen Tove - 2006 - Norsk Filosofisk Tidsskrift 41 (4):284-298.
    Simone de Beauvoir is renown for The Second Sex (1949), a work now considered to be a feminist classic. Nevertheless, when Beauvoir wrote this book she did not explicitly endorse the women's movement, nor did she associate her analysis with the women's liberation. It took twenty-one years after the publication before she publicly declared herself a feminist, but from that point on she was a dedicated feminist. How can her development from a gender blind young philosopher to a radical feminist (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. Ageing and Existentialism: Simone de Beauvoir and the Limits of Freedom.Shannon Mussett - 2006 - In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death and Anti-Death, Volume 4: Twenty Years After De Beauvoir, Thirty Years After Heidegger.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Love, Theory, and Politics: Critical Trinities in Simone de Beauvoir’s The Mandarins.Jen McWeeny - 2005 - In Sally J. Scholz Shannon Mussett (ed.), Contradictions of Freedom: Philosophical Essays on Simone de Beauvoir’s “The Mandarins. SUNY Press. pp. 157-176.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Origins of Otherness: Nonconceptual Ethical Encounters in Beauvoir and Levinas.Jennifer McWeeny - 2009-2010 - Simone de Beauvoir Studies 26:5-17.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Becoming Student: Reflections on the Post-Secular Classroom.Ada S. Jaarsma - 2011 - Listening 46 (3):218-39.
    What would it mean to bring post-secular accounts of learning together with existentialist philosophy, especially in the context of Existentialism classrooms? This essay explores the convergence of the post-secular with the existential, laying out several pedagogical examples of how students might "become" existentially more engaged as students and as post-secular actors.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Essai Sur Beauvoir, Cavell, Etc. [An Essay Concerning Beauvoir, Cavell, Etc.].Nancy Bauer - 2012 - In Eliane Lecarme-Tabone & Jean-Louis Jeannelle (eds.), Cahiers de L'Herne: Beauvoir. L'Herne.
    The link is to an expanded, English version of this essay.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. A Critique of Normative Heterosexuality: Identity, Embodiment, and Sexual Difference in Beauvoir and Irigaray.Ofelia Schutte - 1997 - Hypatia 12 (1):40 - 62.
    The distinction between heterosexuality and homosexuality does not allow for sufficient attention to be given to the question of non-normative heterosexualities. This paper develops a feminist critique of normative sexuality, focusing on alternative readings of sex and/or gender offered by Beauvoir and Irigaray. Despite their differences, both accounts contribute significantly to dismantling the lure of normative sexuality in heterosexual relations-a dismantling necessary to the construction of a feminist social and political order.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  20. La Violence Politique Comme Mauvaise Foi Dans Le Sang des Autres (French Version).Donovan Miyasaki - 2008 - In Julia Kristeva, Pascale Fautrier, Anne Strasser & Pierre-Louis Fort (eds.), (Re) découvrir l’œuvre de Simone de Beauvoir – Du Deuxième Sexe à La Cérémonie des adieux. Éditions Le Bord de l’Eau.
    The Blood of Others begins at the bedside of a mortally wounded Résistance fighter named Hélène Bertrand. We encounter her from the point of view of Jean Blomart, her friend and lover, who recounts the story of their relationship : their first meeting, unhappy romance, bitter breakup, and eventual reunion as fellow fighters for the liberation of occupied France. The novel invites the reader to interpret Hélène and Jean’s story as one of positive ethical development. On this progressive reading, although (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Judith Butler
  1. Ethics is a Gustics: Phenomenology, Gender & Oral Sex.Virgil W. Brower - 2011 - Assuming Gender 2 (1):18-45.
    The 'traditional philosophical prestige' of seeing and touching, as analyzed by Emmanuel Levinas, comes to dominate the qualities of the other three senses. An investigation of the roles of these prestigious senses, along with the resultant privileged sense-organs of the hand and the eye, within phenomenology, psychoanalysis, and gender- or queer-theory suggests that the part of the prestige of touch will have been related to its function in the phenomenality of feeling. Yet the sense of taste seems to be as (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Judith Butler's Critique of Binary Gender Opposition in Gender Trouble: A Task-Based Lesson Sequence.Sasha S. Euler - 2018 - In M. Eisenmann & C. Ludwig (ed.), Queer Beats: Gender and Literature in the EFL Classroom. Frankfurt, Germany: pp. 439-460.
    This chapter presents a task-based lesson sequence based on Judith Butler's Gender Trouble. Gender Trouble is a great piece of philosophical literature. However, as philosophical literature is a genre rarely found in EFL teaching, this chapter first demonstrates in detail the merits of this genre for the teaching ofEnglish for Academic Purposes. After a brief analysis of the source text, which deconstructs the entire sex-gender link and presents both sex and gender as free-floating, this chapter presents task-based methodology and how (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Review of What is A People? [REVIEW]Chatterjee Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2017 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 122 (11):769-70.
    The reviewer connects Derrida's Gloss of the Genesis event to the book under review and discusses the topic of the book under review as an important site for discussing our zeitgeist.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Performing the Discourse of Sexuality Online.David Kreps - 2013 - In Steven Warburton & Stylianos Hatzipanagos (eds.), Digital Identity and Social Media. Hershey, PA: IGI Global. pp. 118-132.
    This chapter focuses on Foucault, Butler, and video-sharing on sexual social networking sites. It argues that the use and prevalence of video-sharing technologies on sexual social networking websites has a direct impact on notions of sexual identity. Though sometimes pitted against one another and at times contradictory, the ideas of Michel Foucault and Judith Butler on the nature and expression of sexuality and gender identities in fact gel rather well, and both can help us to gain a deeper and more (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Towards a Genealogical Feminism: A Reading of Judith Butler's Political Thought.Alison Stone - 2005 - Contemporary Political Theory 4 (1):4-24.
    Judith Butler's contribution to feminist political thought is usually approached in terms of her concept of performativity, according to which gender exists only insofar as it is ritualistically and repetitively performed, creating permanent possibilities for performing gender in new and transgressive ways. In this paper, I argue that Butler's politics of performativity is more fundamentally grounded in the concept of genealogy, which she adapts from Foucault and, ultimately, Nietzsche. Butler understands women to have a genealogy: to be located within a (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  6. Signifying "Hillary": Making Sense with Butler and Dewey.Erin C. Tarver - 2013 - Contemporary Pragmatism 10 (2):25-47.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. "Boys don't cry": note a margine del concetto di soggettività performativa in Judith Butler.Tiberi Simona - 2013 - In F. Minazzi A. C. Di G. Mari (ed.), Epistemologia E Soggettività. Oltre Il Relativismo. Firenze University Press. pp. 121-147.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Amy Allen: The Politics of Our Selves: Power, Autonomy, and Gender in Contemporary Critical Theory. [REVIEW]Debra Jackson - 2010 - Apa Newsletter on Feminism and Philosophy 9 (2):16-17.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Review of Elizabeth A. Wilson, Neural Geographies: Feminism and the Microstructure of Cognition. [REVIEW]John Sutton - 1999 - Philosophy in Review/ Comptes Rendus Philosophiques:299-301.
    Writing within and against the set critical practices of psychoanalytic-deconstructive-Foucauldian-feminist cultural theory, Elizabeth Wilson demonstrates, in this provocative and original book, the productivity and the pleasure of direct, complicitous engagement with the contemporary cognitive sciences. Wilson forges an eclectic method in reaction to the 'zealous but disavowed moralism' of those high cultural Theorists whose 'disciplining compulsion' concocts a monolithic picture of science in order to keep their 'sanitizing critical practice' untainted by its sinister reductionism. Her unsettling accounts of texts by, (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Metaphysics of Sex and Gender.Ásta Kristjana Sveinsdóttir - 2011 - In Charlotte Witt (ed.), Feminist Metaphysics. Springer.
    In this chapter I offer an interpretation of Judith Butler’s metaphysics of sex and gender and situate it in the ontological landscape alongside what has long been the received view of sex and gender in the English speaking world, which owes its inspiration to the works of Simone de Beauvoir. I then offer a critique of Butler’s view, as interpreted, and subsequently an original account of sex and gender, according to which both are constructed—or conferred, as I would put it— (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  11. Mattering. [REVIEW]Pheng Cheah - 1996 - Diacritics 26 (1):108-139.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  12. 50 Key Sociologists: The Contemporary Theorists.John Scott (ed.) - 2007 - Routledge.
    Fifty Key Sociologists: The Contemporary Theorists covers the life, work, ideas and impact of some of the most important thinkers in this discipline. Concentrating on figures writing predominantly in the second half of the twentieth century, such as Zygmunt Bauman, Pierre Bourdieu, Judith Butler, Michel Foucault and Claude Le;vi-Strauss, each entry includes: · full cross-referencing · a further reading section · biographical data · key works and ideas · critical assessment. Clearly presented in an easy-to-navigate A-Z format, this accessible reference (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Rhetoric and Anti-Semitism.Lawrence Lengbeyer - 2004 - Academic Questions 17 (2):22-32.
    Given that charges of anti-Semitism, racism, and the like continue to be potent weapons of moral and intellectual critique in our culture, it is important that we work toward a clear understanding about just what sorts of conduct and circumstances constitute these moral offenses. In particular, can criticism of a state (such as Israel), or other social or political institution or organization (such as the NAACP), ever amount to anti-Semitism, racism, or other bigotry against the people represented by or associated (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. A Case for Human Rights Feminism.Howard Ponzer - 2009 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 16 (2):44-53.
    This article presents a case for human rights feminism as providing us with an effective, but too often under-recognized model for achieving equality in our society. From out of the context of recent feminism, with specific focus on Judith Butler, the author argues that the move to universal human rights is compatible with the critical tradition of identity politics as a means of realizing the goal of gender equality.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Gender Sceptics and Feminist Politics.Mari Mikkola - 2007 - Res Publica 13 (4):361-380.
    Some feminist gender sceptics hold that the conditions for satisfying the concept woman cannot be discerned. This has been taken to suggest that (i) the efforts to fix feminism’s scope are undermined because of confusion about the extension of the term ‘woman’, and (ii) this confusion suggests that feminism cannot be organised around women because it is unclear who satisfies woman. Further, this supposedly threatens the effectiveness of feminist politics: feminist goals are said to become unachievable, if feminist politics lacks (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Julia Kristeva
  1. Killing in the Name of Care.Joel Michael Reynolds - forthcoming - Levinas Studies.
    On 26 July 2016, Satoshi Uematsu murdered 19 and injured 26 at a caregiving facility in Sagamihara, Japan, making it the country’s worst mass killing since WWII. In this article, I offer an analysis of the Sagamihara 19 massacre. I draw on the work of Julia Kristeva and Emmanuel Levinas to argue that claims about disability experience are insufficient to justify normative projects. In short, disability is normatively ambiguous.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Review of Julia Kristeva's This Incredible Need to Believe. [REVIEW]Chatterjee Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2017 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 122 (10):720-21.
    This reviewer had read Kristeva in October, 2016 in this Journal (and the review is freely available online and had garnered some small publicity). Over the last one year this reviewer has taken a very short view of her tautological work. Having read her carefully this reviewer has decided that she should be rejected as a psychoanalyst, notwithstanding her huge popularity as a feminist. But this reviewer through a nuanced critique of theoretical psychoanalysis find her and her ilk lacking caritas.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Kristeva’s Subject-in-Process: From Structure to Semiotic Criticism.William D. Melaney - 2009 - In Paul Forsell Eero Tarasti (ed.), Understanding/misunderstanding : Proceedings of the 9th Congress of the IASS/AIS, Helsinki-Imatra, 11-17 June, 2007. International Semiotics Institute. pp. 1074-81.
    As presented in the early work, 'Revolution in Poetic Language,' Julia Kristeva’s 'subject-in-process' can be interpreted as a semiotic alternative to older conceptions of the philosophical subject.This discussion of Kristeva’s early work will attempt to demonstrate that new interpretations of Fregean logic and Freudian psychoanalysis radically displace the traditional subject. This act of displacement allows Kristeva to employ Hegelian dialectics to introduce a “textual” conception of meaning of experience. As a consequence, the Kristevan semiotexte offers a basis for both understanding (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Another Other: The Foreigner.Gabriel Furmuzachi - manuscript
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Xopóσ: Dancing Into the Sacred Space of Chora: An Inquiry Into the Choir of Dance From the Chora.Nicoletta Isar - 2005 - Byzantion 75:199-224.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The Complicated History of Einfühlung.Magdalena Nowak - 2011 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 1 (2):301-326.
    The article analyses the history of the Einfühlung concept. Theories of ‘feeling into’ Nature, works of art or feelings and behaviours of other persons by German philosophers of the second half of the nineteenth century Robert and Friedrich Vischer and Theodor Lipps are evoked, as well as similar theory of understanding (Verstehen) by Wilhelm Dilthey and Friedrich Schleiermacher, to which Dilthey refers. The meaning of the term Einfühlung within Edith Stein’s thought is also analysed. Both Einfühlung and Verstehen were criticized (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Fluidizing the Mirror: Feminism and Identity Through Kristeva’s Looking Glass.Christina Hendricks - 1997 - Philosophy Today 41 (Suppl):79-89.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Ground Zero for a Post-Moral Ethics in J. M. Coetzee’s Disgrace and Julia Kristeva’s Melancholic.Cynthia Willett - 2012 - Continental Philosophy Review 45 (1):1-22.
    Perhaps no other novel has received as much attention from moral philosophers as South African writer J. M. Coetzee’s Disgrace . The novel is ethically compelling and yet no moral theory explains its force. Despite clear Kantian moments, neither rationalism nor self-respect can account for the strange ethical task that the protagonist sets for himself. Calling himself the dog man, like the ancient Cynics, this shamelessly cynical protagonist takes his cues for ethics not from humans but from animals. He does (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. From Receptivity to Transformation: On the Intersection of Race, Gender, and the Aesthetic in Contemporary Continental Philosophy.Robin James - 2010 - In Kathryn Gines, Donna-Dale Marcano & Maria Davidson (eds.), Convergences: Black Feminism and Continental Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  10. Feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'.Robin James - 2011 - In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. The Speaking Abject in Kristeva's "Powers of Horror".Thea Harrington - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (1):138-157.
    This essay analyzes the implications of the performative aspects of Julia Kristeva 's Powers of Horror by situating this work in the context of similar aspects of her previous work. This construction and its relationship to abjection are integral components of Kristeva 's notion of practice and as such are fundamental to her critique of Hegel and Freud.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  12. Against Matricide: Rethinking Subjectivity and the Maternal Body.Alison Stone - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (1):118-138.
    In this article I critically re-examine Julia Kristeva's view that becoming a speaking subject requires psychical matricide: violent separation from the maternal body. I propose an alternative, non-matricidal conception of subjectivity, in part by drawing out anti-matricidal strands in Kristeva's own thought, including her view that early mother–child relations are triangular. Whereas she understands this triangle in terms of a first imaginary father, I re-interpret this triangle using Donald Winnicott's idea of potential space and Jessica Benjamin's idea of an intersubjective (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  13. The Feminine and the Sacred (Review). [REVIEW]Christina Hendricks - 2004 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (2):161-164.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Luce Irigaray
  1. Spinoza, Feminism, and Domestic Violence.Christopher Yeomans - 2003 - Iyyun 52 (1):54-74.
    In this paper I discuss two related ideas and cross-reference them, as it were, on the common ground of the Spinozistic text. First, I want to construct a Spinozistic account of domestic violence and a Spinozistic response to such violence. This will involve attempting to explicate the phenomenon (or at least one aspect of it, to be defined) through the terms and conceptual structure of Spinoza's Ethics. Second, I want to discuss a feminist reading (interpretation) of Spinoza, that of Luce (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 84