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  1. The Preservation Paradox and Natural Capital.C. Tyler DesRoches - forthcoming - Ecosystem Services: Science, Policy and Practice.
    Many ecological economists have argued that some natural capital should be preserved for posterity. Yet, among environmental philosophers, the preservation paradox entails that preserving parts of nature, including those denoted by natural capital, is impossible. The paradox claims that nature is a realm of phenomena independent of intentional human agency, that preserving and restoring nature require intentional human agency, and, therefore, no one can preserve or restore nature (without making it artificial). While this article argues that the preservation paradox is (...)
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  2. Hsiao on the Moral Status of Animals: Two Simple Responses.Timothy Perrine - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (5):927-933.
    According to a common view, animals have moral status. Further, a standard defense of this view is the Argument from Consciousness: animals have moral status because they are conscious and can experience pain and it would be bad were they to experience pain. In a series of papers :277–291, 2015a, J Agric Environ Ethics 28:11270–1138, 2015b, J Agric Environ Ethics 30:37–54, 2017), Timothy Hsiao claims that animals do not have moral status and criticizes the Argument from Consciousness. This short paper (...)
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  3. Benjamin Franks, Stuart Hanscomb, and Sean F. Johnston, Environmental Ethics and Behavioural Change.Trevor Hedberg - 2018 - Teaching Ethics 18 (2):183-185.
    Environmental Ethics and Behavioral Change is a unique text that weaves together subject in ethics, moral psychology, and political philosophy to explore the ways in which people can be motivated to behave in more environmentally sustainable ways. In this review, I offer a short synopsis of the book and appraise its usefulness for teaching courses in environmental ethics and related areas.
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  4. Waarden in water.Neelke Doorn - 2018 - Delft, Netherlands: Delft University of Technology.
    Intreerede In verkorte vorm uitgesproken op 16 november 2018 ter gelegenheid van de aanvaarding van het ambt van hoogleraar ‘Ethics of water engineering’ aan de faculteit Techniek, Bestuur en Management van de Technische Universiteit Delft.
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  5. Values in Water.Neelke Doorn - 2018 - Delft, Netherlands: Delft University of Technology.
    Inaugural speech spoken in acceptance of the chair ‘Ethics of water engineering’ at the Faculty of Technology, Policy and Management of Delft University of Technology on 16 November 2018.
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  6. Save the Meat for Cats: Why It’s Wrong to Eat Roadkill.C. E. Abbate - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 32 (1):165-182.
    Because factory-farmed meat production inflicts gratuitous suffering upon animals and wreaks havoc on the environment, there are morally compelling reasons to become vegetarian. Yet industrial plant agriculture causes the death of many field animals, and this leads some to question whether consumers ought to get some of their protein from certain kinds of non factory-farmed meat. Donald Bruckner, for instance, boldly argues that the harm principle implies an obligation to collect and consume roadkill and that strict vegetarianism is thus immoral. (...)
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  7. Natural Law and the Natural Environment: Pope Benedict XVI's Vision Beyond Utilitarianism and Deontology.Michael Baur - 2013 - In Tobias Winwright & Jame Schaefer (eds.), Environmental Justice and Climate Change: Assessing Pope Benedict XVI's Ecological Vision for the Catholic Church in the United States. Lanham, MD 20706, USA: pp. 43-57.
    In his 2009 encyclical letter Caritas in Veritate, Pope Benedict XVI calls for a deeper, theological and metaphysical evaluation of the category of “relation” to achieve a proper understanding of the human being’s “transcendent dignity.” For some contemporary thinkers, this position might seem to be hopelessly paradoxical or even incoherent. After all, many contemporary thinkers are apt to believe that the human creature can have “transcendent dignity” only if the being and goodness of the human creature is not conditioned by (...)
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  8. A Phenomenological Theory of Ecological Responsibility and Its Implications for Moral Agency in Climate Change.Robert H. Scott - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (6):645-659.
    In a recent article appearing in this journal, Theresa Scavenius compellingly argues that the traditional “rational-individualistic” conception of responsibility is ill-suited to accounting for the sense in which moral agents share in responsibility for both contributing to the causes and, proactively, working towards solutions for climate change. Lacking an effective moral framework through which to make sense of individual moral responsibility for climate change, many who have good intentions and the means to contribute to solutions for climate change tend to (...)
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  9. Lab‐Grown Meat and Veganism: A Virtue‐Oriented Perspective.Carlo Alvaro - 2019 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (135):1-15.
    The project of growing meat artificially represents for some the next best thing to humanity. If successful, it could be the solution to several problems, such as feed- ing a growing global population while reducing the environmental impact of raising animals for food and, of course, reducing the amount and degree of animal cruelty and suffering that is involved in animal farming. In this paper, I argue that the issue of the morality of such a project has been framed only (...)
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  10. Principio de Lesividad en la cuestión ambiental: el caso Barrio Ituzaingó anexo de la ciudad de Córdoba.Santiago Truccone Borgogno - 2015 - Revista de la Facultad de Derecho: Nueva Serie II (UNC) 2 (6):193-213.
    El presente escrito pretende analizar el principio de lesividad en un concreto ordenamiento legal como es el argentino. Para ello se utilizará al caso “Barrio Ituzaingó anexo de la ciudad de Córdoba”. Se intentarán evaluar los argumentos del tribunal a los fines de dilucidar si son acordes con lo que el ordenamiento constitucional argentino permite. Asimismo, se introducirá un inconveniente -el problema de la no-identidad- el que nos dejará frente a una situación dilemática.
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  11. The Cosmology of St Maximus the Confessor as a Basis for Ecological and Humanitarian Ethics.Emma Brown Dewhurst - 2014 - Teologikon 1 (3):126-140.
    This paper explores the cosmology of St Maximus the Confessor and its relevance for contemporary ethics. It takes as it’s starting point two papers on Maximus’ cosmology and environmental ethics (Bordeianu, 2009; Munteanu, 2010) and from there argues that we can not consider environmental ethics in isolation from other ethical issues. This, as both Ware and Keselopoulos have also pointed out, is because the environmental crisis is actually a crisis in the human heart and in human attitudes toward everything about (...)
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  12. How Ecology Can Edify Ethics: The Scope of Morality.Lantz Fleming Miller - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (4):443-454.
    Over the past several decades environmental ethics has grown markedly, normative ethics having provided essential grounding in assessing human treatment of the environment. Even a systematic approach, such as Paul Taylor’s, in a sense tells the environment how it is to be treated, whether that be Earth’s ecosystem or the universe itself. Can the environment, especially the ecosystem, as understood through the study of ecology, in turn offer normative and applied ethics any edification? The study of ecology has certainly increased (...)
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  13. Harvesting the Promise of AOPs: An Assessment and Recommendations.Annamaria Carusi, Mark R. Davies, Giovanni De De Grandis, Beate I. Escher, Geoff Hodges, Kenneth M. Y. Leung, Maurice Wheelan, Catherine Willet & Gerald T. Ankley - 2018 - Science of the Total Environment 628:1542-1556.
    The Adverse Outcome Pathway (AOP) concept is a knowledge assembly and communication tool to facilitate the transparent translation of mechanistic information into outcomes meaningful to the regulatory assessment of chemicals. The AOP framework and associated knowledgebases (KBs) have received significant attention and use in the regulatory toxicology community. However, it is increasingly apparent that the potential stakeholder community for the AOP concept and AOP KBs is broader than scientists and regulators directly involved in chemical safety assessment. In this paper we (...)
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  14. Dominic Roser and Christian Seidel, Climate Justice: An Introduction (Trans. Ciaran Cronin). [REVIEW]Megan Blomfield - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (2):203-205.
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  15. Reframing Tacit Human-Nature Relations: An Inquiry Into Process Philosophy and the Philosophy of Michael Polanyi.Roope Oskari Kaaronen - 2018 - Environmental Values 27 (2):179-201.
    To combat the ecological crisis, fundamental change is required in how humans perceive nature. This paper proposes that the human-nature bifurcation, a metaphysical mental model that is deeply entrenched and may be environmentally unsound, stems from embodied and tacitly-held substance-biased belief systems. Process philosophy can aid us, among other things, in providing an alternative framework for reinterpreting this bifurcation by drawing an ontological bridge between humans and nature, thus providing a coherent philosophical basis for sustainable dwelling and policy-making. Michael Polanyi's (...)
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  16. Precaution and Fairness: A Framework for Distributing Costs of Protection From Environmental Risks.Espen Dyrnes Stabell & Daniel Steel - 2018 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 31 (1):55-71.
    While there is an extensive literature on how the precautionary principle should be interpreted and when precautions should be taken, relatively little discussion exists about the fair distribution of costs of taking precautions. We address this issue by proposing a general framework for deciding how costs of precautions should be shared, which consists of a series of default principles that are triggered according to desert, rights, and ability to pay. The framework is developed with close attention to the pragmatics of (...)
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  17. PHIL*4040 Photocopy Packet (Animal Rights) (Edited by V.I. Burke.Victoria I. Burke (ed.) - 2014 - Guelph: University of Guelph.
    This out-of-print collection on animal rights, applied ethics, and continental philosophy includes readings by Martin Heidegger, Karin De Boer, Martha Nussbaum, David De Grazia, Giorgio Agamben, Peter Singer, Tom Regan, David Morris, Michael Thompson, Stephen Jay Gould, Sue Donaldson, Carolyn Merchant, and Jacques Derrida.
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  18. Ethical Veganism, Virtue, and Greatness of the Soul.Carlo Alvaro - 2017 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 30 (6):765-781.
    Many moral philosophers have criticized intensive animal farming because it can be harmful to the environment, it causes pain and misery to a large number of animals, and furthermore eating meat and animal-based products can be unhealthful. The issue of industrially farmed animals has become one of the most pressing ethical questions of our time. On the one hand, utilitarians have argued that we should become vegetarians or vegans because the practices of raising animals for food are immoral since they (...)
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  19. On the Contribution of Philosophical and Geoscientific Inquiry to Geoethics (Qua Applied Ethics).Thomas Pölzler - 2017 - Annals of Geophysics 60 (7):1-6.
    This paper is about the methodology of geoethics qua applied ethics. In particular, I investigate the contributions of philosophical and geoscientific inquiry. My investigation is based on a general model of geoethical research. For each stage of this model I explain the expected contribution of “the philosopher” and “the geoscientist” (assuming that they are different persons). These general considerations are illustrated by the example of a particular geoethical research question that is currently addressed in the Austrian Academy of Sciences project (...)
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  20. Ethical but Upsetting Geoscience Research: A Case Study.Thomas Pölzler & Florian Ortner - 2017 - Annals of Geophysics 60 (7):1-6.
    Geoscience research may upset people even though it is ethically acceptable. In this paper we attempt to explore three questions about such research. It will turn out that (1) under most circumstances ethical but upsetting geoscience research is morally permissible, (2) revising this research in response to upset-induced external interference is morally impermissible in the absence of strong countervailing pragmatic reasons and attempts to reduce upset, and (3) potentially upsetting geoscience research ought to be communicated truthfully and tailored to each (...)
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  21. Why Gaia? Pigliucci - 2014 - Ethics and the Environment 19 (2):117.
    “The Gaia Hypothesis: Science on a Pagan Planet tells a story that comes out of the 1960s, a story that reflects all of the beliefs and enthusiasms and tensions of that decade.” So begins Michael Ruse’s fascinating, if at times puzzling, exploration of James Lovelock’s famous idea that our planet is, in a serious scientific sense, a living organism with a tendency of taking care of self. But why tell this particular story, especially considering that Gaia hardly makes an appearance (...)
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  22. Life Questioning Itself: By Way of an Introduction.Arran Gare - 2008 - Cosmos and History : The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 4 (1-2):1-14.
    This is the introductory essay to the special edition of 'Cosmos & History' focusing on the question 'What is Life?'.
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  23. Engineering the Climate: The Ethics of Solar Radiation Management. [REVIEW]Toby Svoboda - 2017 - Environmental Ethics 39 (1):101-104.
    This important edited collection addresses ethical issues associated with solar radiation management (SRM), a category of climate engineering techniques that would increase the planet’s reflectivity in order to offset some of the impacts of anthropogenic climate change. Such techniques include injecting sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere or brightening marine clouds with seawater. Although SRM has the potential to cool the planet by reducing the amount of incoming solar radiation absorbed by the planet, it raises a wide array of difficult and (...)
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  24. Driven to Extinction? The Ethics of Eradicating Mosquitoes with Gene-Drive Technologies.Jonathan Pugh - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9):578-581.
    Mosquito-borne diseases represent a significant global disease burden, and recent outbreaks of such diseases have led to calls to reduce mosquito populations. Furthermore, advances in ‘gene-drive’ technology have raised the prospect of eradicating certain species of mosquito via genetic modification. This technology has attracted a great deal of media attention, and the idea of using gene-drive technology to eradicate mosquitoes has been met with criticism in the public domain. In this paper, I shall dispel two moral objections that have been (...)
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  25. One Child: Do We Have a Right to Have More? By Sarah Conly. [REVIEW]Trevor Hedberg - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):934-938.
    Sarah Conly's One Child is a substantive treatment of the extent to which procreative freedom is curtailed by rising global population and the environmental problems to which it contributes. This review provides an overview of the book's content and closes with a few critical remarks. The book is highly recommended for those interested in the intersection between environmental ethics and the ethics of procreation.
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  26. Natural Hazards and the Normative Significance of Expectations in Protecting Alpine Communities.Thomas Pölzler, Florian Ortner, Oliver Sass & Lukas Meyer - 2017 - Geophysical Research Abstracts: Abstracts of the European Geosciences Union General Assembly.
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  27. Environmental Ethics for the Long Term: An Introduction. [REVIEW]Trevor Hedberg - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):121-124.
    In this book review, I assess the merits of John Nolt's Environmental Ethics for the Long Term: An Introduction. Although the book is written as a primary text for an environmental ethics course, some of its later chapters are clearly written more for academic philosophers than undergraduate students. As a textbook, Nolt's book is excellent and an ideal choice for those who want to emphasize the long-term impacts of various environmental problems (e.g., climate change, biodiversity loss) in their courses. Regarding (...)
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  28. LOS DESAFÍOS DE LA ÉTICA AMBIENTAL.Miguel Acosta, Pablo Martínez de Anguita & Mª Angeles Martín Rodríguez-Ovelleiro - 2004 - In ¿Qué Cultura? V Congreso Católicos y Vida Pública, tomo II. Madrid, Spain: Fundación Santa María. pp. 955-968.
    En 1968 Raquel Carson comenzaba una revolución en el pensamiento, quizá una de las de mayor peso en la actualidad. En su libro "La primavera silenciosa" acusaba del deterioro ambiental al poder ilimitado del ser humano. La creencia surgida en la modernidad de que todo lo que el hombre decidía era en sí mismo lo mejor por haber sido fruto de una voluntad libérrima, daba primacía y legitimidad absoluta a su acción sobre la naturaleza. Surgieron con gran fuerza numerosos grupos (...)
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  29. Nihilism Incorporated: European Civilization and Environmental Destruction (Review). [REVIEW]Arran Gare - 1995 - Environmental Values 4 (3):278-280.
    Review of 'Nihilism Incorporated: European Civilization and Environmental Destruction.
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  30. The Twofold Myth of Pristine Wilderness: Misreading the Wilderness Act in Terms of Purity.Scott Friskics - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (4):381-399.
    In recent years, the notion of wilderness has been roundly criticized by several prominent environmental philosophers and historians. They argue that the “received wilderness idea” is dualistic, ethnocentric, and static. According to these critics, this idea of wilderness finds clear expression in the Wilderness Act of 1964. However, the idea of wilderness so ably deconstructed by its critics bears little resemblance to the understanding of wilderness presented in the Wilderness Act. The critics assume a backward-looking, purity-based definition of wilderness that (...)
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  31. Restitutive Restoration: New Motivations for Ecological Restoration.John Basl - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (2):135-147.
    Our environmental wrongdoings result in a moral debt that requires restitution. One component of restitution is reparative and another is remediative. The remediative component requires that we remediate our characters in ways that alter or eliminate the character traits that tend to lead, in their expression, to environmental wrongdoing. Restitutive restoration is a way of engaging in ecological restoration that helps to meet the remediative requirement that accompanies environmental wrongdoing. This account of restoration provides a new motivation and justification for (...)
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  32. The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. [REVIEW]J. Robert Loftis - 2005 - Environmental Ethics 27 (4):429-432.
    This is a very positive review of Carlson, Allen, and Arnold Berleant, ed. 2004. The Aesthetics of Natural Environments. Broadview Press. -/- .
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  33. Environmental Dilemmas: Ethical Decision Making. [REVIEW]Tom Spector - 2009 - Environmental Ethics 31 (4):439-440.
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  34. Recension av Håkan Salwén, Miljöetik: en introduktion. [REVIEW]Gustav Alexandrie - 2014 - Filosofisk Tidskrift 35 (2):42-45.
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  35. “It’s the Economy, Stupid!” and the Environment.Robert L. Chapman - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (4):465-484.
    The current economic/political system, neoliberalism, has touched every aspect of life globally. The doctrine of neoliberalism consists of three central propositions, that the market is real and part of the natural universal law; that unlimited economic growth is both possible and even desirable; and that human nature is coincident with market values and based solely on self-interest. All three of these propositions are seriously flawed and have caused immense human suffering and staggering environmental destruction. This paper is a reminder of (...)
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  36. Ecological Innovation: Biomimicry as a New Way of Thinking and Acting Ecologically.Vincent Blok & Bart Gremmen - 2016 - Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 29 (2):203-217.
    In this article, we critically reflect on the concept of biomimicry. On the basis of an analysis of the concept of biomimicry in the literature and its philosophical origin, we distinguish between a strong and a weaker concept of biomimicry. The strength of the strong concept of biomimicry is that nature is seen as a measure by which to judge the ethical rightness of our technological innovations, but its weakness is found in questionable presuppositions. These presuppositions are addressed by the (...)
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  37. Book Review: Anthony O’Hear, Ed., Philosophy and the Environment. [REVIEW]Katie McShane - 2013 - Environmental Ethics 35 (4):489-492.
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  38. On the Epistemology of the Precautionary Principle.J. Adam Carter & Martin Peterson - 2015 - Erkenntnis 80 (1):1-13.
    In this paper we present two distinctly epistemological puzzles that arise for one who aspires to defend some plausible version of the precautionary principle. The first puzzle involves an application of contextualism in epistemology; and the second puzzle concerns the task of defending a plausible version of the precautionary principle that would not be invalidated by de minimis.
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  39. Hybridity in Agriculture.Catherine Kendig - 2014 - In Paul B. Thompson & David M. Kaplan (eds.), Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics. Springer.
    In a very general sense, hybrid can be understood to be any organism that is the product of two (or more) organisms where each parent belongs to a different kind. For example; the offspring from two or more parent organisms, each belonging to a separate species (or genera), is called a “hybrid”. “Hybridity” refers to the phenomenal character of being a hybrid. And “hybridization ” refers to both natural and artificial processes of generating hybrids. These processes include mechanisms of selective (...)
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  40. Cost Benefit Analysis and the Environment.N. Hanley & C. Spash - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (2):182-183.
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  41. The Mainframe of an Adequate and Effective Environmental Ethics.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2008 - Skepsis: A Journal for Philosophy and Interdisciplinary Research 19 (1-2):282-292.
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  42. Courage as an Environmental Virtue.Rachel Fredericks - 2014 - Environmental Ethics 36 (3):339-355.
    We should give courage a more significant place in our understanding of how familiar virtues can and should be reshaped to capture what it is to be virtuous relative to the environment. Matthew Pianalto’s account of moral courage helps explain what a specifically environmental form of moral courage would look like. There are three benefits to be gained by recognizing courage as an environmental virtue: it helps us to recognize the high stakes nature of much environmental activism and to act (...)
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  43. Value Monism, Richness, And Environmental Ethics.Chris Kelly - 2014 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 9 (2):110-129.
    The intuitions at the core of environmental ethics and of other neglected value realms put pressure on traditional anthropocentric ethics based on monistic value theories. Such pressure is so severe that it has led many to give up on the idea of monistic value theories altogether. I argue that value monism is still preferable to value pluralism and that, indeed, these new challenges are opportunities to vastly improve impoverished traditional theories. I suggest an alternative monistic theory, Richness Theory, and show (...)
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  44. Richness Theory: From Value to Action.Gregory M. Mikkelson - 2014 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 9 (2):99-109.
    Richness theory offers a promising axiology. In this paper, I discuss how to translate it into a deontology. To do so, I recruit the concept of moral distance from a recently developed epistemology, and construe it in terms of causal power. Finally, I apply the resulting decision-theoretic framework to the question of how best to avert ecological disaster over the next 36 years and achieve ecological harmony over the next 986.
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  45. Thinking Globally, Acting Locally: Partiality, Preferences and Perspective.Graham Oddie - 2014 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 9 (2):57-81.
    A rather promising value theory for environmental philosophers combines the well-known fitting attitude (FA) account of value with the rather less well-known account of value as richness. If the value of an entity is proportional to its degree of richness (which has been cashed out in terms of unified complexity and organic unity), then since natural entities, such as species or ecosystems, exhibit varying degrees of richness quite independently of what we happen to feel about them, they also possess differing (...)
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  46. L’habiter ou le bien de l’architecture.Rabah Bousbaci - 2009 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 4 (1):20-33.
    Le bâtir est un trait fondamental de la condition humaine. À notre époque, les réflexions en vue de mieux comprendre le sens phénoménologique et anthropologique de l’acte de bâtir se mul- tiplient. La constante qui semble rallier ces réflexions consiste à reconnaître l’enracinement du sens de l’acte de bâtir dans l’habiter : le bâtir puiserait ainsi sa signification première dans l’ha- biter. Ce ralliement et ce consensus semblent marquer ainsi ce que l’histoire pourrait un jour désigner comme le « tournant (...)
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  47. S’exercer à l’empathie : une expérience pédagogique en design d’intérieur.Rabah Bousbaci - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (2):126-143.
    Les professionnels ont par définition un public bénéficiaire de leurs services : le patient pour le médecin, le psychologue ou l’infirmière ; le client pour l’avocat ; le consommateur pour le gestionnaire d’une entreprise commerciale ; etc. L’usager ou l’habitant du cadre bâti constitue un des destinataires des services professionnels du designer d’intérieur. De quelle manière peut-on apprendre aux étudiants/futurs professionnels du design d’intérieur à se mettre à la place de l’usager/habitant des espaces qu’ils conçoivent ? Le concept de l’empathie, (...)
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  48. L’approche phénoménologique en urbanisme : la recherche d’une meilleure pratique, la pratique d’une meilleure recherche.Juan Torres & Sandra Breux - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (2):117-125.
    En urbanisme, l’approche phénoménologique permet de se pencher sur l’expérience de l’individu et, plus précisément, sur le rapport que celui-ci entretient avec son milieu de vie. Cette approche permet de concevoir des milieux de vie mieux adaptés aux besoins et aux expectatives des individus et suppose des démarches d’aménagement qui accordent un rôle important au citoyen. Toutefois, si l’approche phénoménologique est couramment utilisée dans le cadre de travaux théoriques, elle est difficilement adoptée sur le terrain, en dépit de son utilité (...)
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  49. Savoirs experts et idiome quotidien. Biens et vertus de la conception participative des velos de quartiers à Trois-Rivières.Philippe Gauthier - 2010 - Les ateliers de l'éthique/The Ethics Forum 5 (2):66-75.
    Dans ce texte, nous analysons la mise en place d’un système de vélos partagés à Trois-Rivières initié par un organisme faisant de la participation citoyenne son principe fondamental d’action. Cette analyse montre comment l’atteinte des objectifs poursuivis par l’adhésion à ce principe participatif, outre le respect de l’expérience du citoyen dans le développement de son milieu de vie, peut poser problème. La similarité entre le système de vélos conçu avec la participation des citoyens et les systèmes offerts par les groupes (...)
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  50. Environmental Human Rights : Urgency for a Concrete Formulation.Louis Vervoort - manuscript
    In the present article, I will evaluate the utility of environmental human rights in the light of the global climate conditions prevailing in the beginning of the second decade of the 21st century. Human rights and their tools have proven useful on many occasions. Here I will promote the idea that the ecological situation we are facing now is so urgent that we should exploit their potential to the fullest. To that end, I will argue, there is a clear need (...)
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