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  1. Ecological Imagination and Aims of Moral Education Through the Kyoto School and American Pragmatism.Steven Fesmire - 2012 - In Paul Standish & Naoko Saito (eds.), Education and the Kyoto School of Philosophy. Dordrecht, Netherlands: pp. 109-130.
    Cross-cultural dialogue between the Kyoto School of modern Japanese philosophy and the classical pragmatist tradition in American philosophy can help educators to clarify aims for greater ecological responsiveness in moral education. This dialogue can contribute to meeting an urgent practical need to cultivate ecological imagination, and an equally practical need to make theoretical sense of the way in which ecological perception becomes relevant to moral deliberation. The first section of this chapter explores relational thinking in the Kyoto School and American (...)
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Japanese Buddhist Philosophy
  1. Dōgens Sprachdenken. Historische Und Symboltheoretische Perspektiven [Dōgen’s Language Thinking. Historic and Symbol Theoretic Perspectives].Ralf Müller - 2013 - Freiburg im Breisgau, Deutschland: Verlag Karl Alber.
    Wie denkt Dogen (1200-1253) Sprache im Horizont der sprachkritischen Tradition des Zenbuddhismus? Die vorliegende Studie widmet sich dieser Frage und rekonstruiert umfassend das Sprachdenken des philosophisch fruchtbarsten Autors der japanischen Vormoderne. Dazu wählt der Autor einen doppelten Zugang: zum einen rezeptionsgeschichtlich unter Einschluss von Philosophen des modernen Japans, zum anderen systematisch mithilfe der Symboltheorie Ernst Cassirers in der Theoretisierung eines adäquaten Sprachbegriffs. So verschränken sich mit Interpretationen zum Hauptwerk Dogens, dem Shobogenzo, Außen- und Innenperspektive auf ein zenbuddhistisches Sprachdenken und erweisen (...)
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  2. Maraldo, John: "Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida". [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2019 - 西田哲学会年報 16:153-145.
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  3. Filosofia e Budismo em Diálogo, organizado por Antonio Florentino Neto. [REVIEW]Lucas Dos Reis Martins - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1 (1):369-371.
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Tendai Buddhism
  1. Materialien und Auswahlbibliographie zur japanischsprachigen Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung.Leon Krings - 2017 - In Rolf Elberfeld (ed.), Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung in globaler Perspektive (Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie Bd. 9). Hamburg, Deutschland: pp. 341-364.
    Selected Bibiliography and Overview of Japanese Philosophy by reference to major Japanese Anthologies of Traditional and Modern Japanese Thought / Philosophy, listing a wide range of Japanese philosophers and thinkers from ancient times to the present.
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Shingon Buddhism
  1. Materialien und Auswahlbibliographie zur japanischsprachigen Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung.Leon Krings - 2017 - In Rolf Elberfeld (ed.), Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung in globaler Perspektive (Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie Bd. 9). Hamburg, Deutschland: pp. 341-364.
    Selected Bibiliography and Overview of Japanese Philosophy by reference to major Japanese Anthologies of Traditional and Modern Japanese Thought / Philosophy, listing a wide range of Japanese philosophers and thinkers from ancient times to the present.
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Japanese Zen Buddhism
  1. Hay’s Buddhist Philosophy of Gestural Language.Joshua M. Hall - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (3):175-188.
    The central role of gestural language in Buddhism is widely acknowledged, as in the story of the Buddha pointing at the moon, the point being the student’s seeing beyond the finger to its gesture. Gesture’s role in dance is similarly central, as noted by scholars in the emerging interdisciplinary field of dance studies. Unsurprisingly, then, the intersection of these two fields is well-populated, including the formal gestures Buddhism inherited from classical Indian dance, and the masked dance of the Mani Rimdu (...)
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  2. Zen and Japanese Culture.Daisetz T. Suzuki & Richard M. Jaffe - 1959 - Princeton University Press.
    Zen and Japanese Culture is one of the twentieth century's leading works on Zen, and a valuable source for those wishing to understand its concepts in the context of Japanese life and art. In simple, often poetic, language, Daisetz Suzuki describes his conception of Zen and its historical evolution. He connects Zen to the philosophy of the samurai, and subtly portrays the relationship between Zen and swordsmanship, haiku, tea ceremonies, and the Japanese love of nature. Suzuki's contemplative work is enhanced (...)
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  3. Zen Buddhism, Satori, Enlightenment & Truth.Peter Eastman - 2015
    Satori Zen is of immense interest to anyone pursuing authentic metaphysical knowledge because it claims to offer an astonishingly straightforward path to full Spiritual Enlightenment. And in terms of outright simplicity and immediate applicability, there is no other spiritual technique quite like it, in any other tradition anywhere. But does it do what it claims to do ? Can you really ‘power your way into heaven’ by brute meditative force ? And does this then mean that satori is equivalent to (...)
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Sōtō Zen
Dōgen
  1. The Self in Deep Ecology: A Response to Watson.Joshua Anderson - 2020 - Asian Philosophy 30 (1):30-39.
    Richard Watson maintains that deep ecology suffers from an internal contradiction and should therefore be rejected. Watson contends that deep ecology claims to be non-anthropocentric while at the same time is committed to setting humans apart from nature, which is inherently anthropocentric. I argue that Watson’s objection arises out of a fundamental misunderstanding of how deep ecologist’s conceive of the ‘Self.’ Drawing on resources from Buddhism, I offer an understanding of the ‘Self’ that is fully consistent with deep ecology, and (...)
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  2. The Idea of the Mirror in Dōgen and Nishida.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 99-142.
    The image of the “mirror” (鏡kagami) appears frequently in the philosophical texts of Nishida Kitaro (西田幾多郎1870-1945), where it assumes various functions. Mirror references first occur in meditations on the philosophies of Josiah Royce (1855-1916) and Henri Bergson (1859-1941). The most fascinating evocation here corresponds to the idea of a “self-enlightening mirror”, used to probe the philosophical ground for self-illumination. This idea seems to point back to Buddhist meaning that intervenes in Japanese intellectual history. We take this as our warrant for (...)
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Japanese Buddhist Philosophy, Misc
  1. Morale buddista.Sergio Volodia Marcello Cremaschi - 1996 - In Virgilio Melchiorre (ed.), Enciclopedia della Filosofia e delle Scienze Umane. Novara: DeAgostini. pp. 636-637.
    A short presentation of Buddhist moral doctrines according to its distinct schools.
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Japanese Confucian Philosophy
  1. Maraldo, John: "Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida". [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2019 - 西田哲学会年報 16:153-145.
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  2. Myth.Kiyoshi Miki & John Krummel - 2016 - Social Imaginaries 2 (1):25-69.
    “Myth” comprises the first chapter of the book, The Logic of the Imagination, by Miki Kiyoshi. In this chapter Miki analyzes the significance of myth (shinwa) as possessing a certain reality despite being “fictions.” He begins by broadening the meaning of the imagination to argue for a logic of the imagination that involves expressive action or poiesis (production) in general, of which myth is one important product. The imagination gathers in myth material from the environing world lived by the social (...)
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Ogyū Sorai
  1. Materialien und Auswahlbibliographie zur japanischsprachigen Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung.Leon Krings - 2017 - In Rolf Elberfeld (ed.), Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung in globaler Perspektive (Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie Bd. 9). Hamburg, Deutschland: pp. 341-364.
    Selected Bibiliography and Overview of Japanese Philosophy by reference to major Japanese Anthologies of Traditional and Modern Japanese Thought / Philosophy, listing a wide range of Japanese philosophers and thinkers from ancient times to the present.
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Andō Shōeki
  1. Materialien und Auswahlbibliographie zur japanischsprachigen Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung.Leon Krings - 2017 - In Rolf Elberfeld (ed.), Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung in globaler Perspektive (Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie Bd. 9). Hamburg, Deutschland: pp. 341-364.
    Selected Bibiliography and Overview of Japanese Philosophy by reference to major Japanese Anthologies of Traditional and Modern Japanese Thought / Philosophy, listing a wide range of Japanese philosophers and thinkers from ancient times to the present.
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Shinto and Kokugaku Philosophy
  1. Cuando el caos y lo invisible son primordiales. Aproximación a la mitología japonesa -tierra, tiempo, forma y palabra.Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2017
    Resumen: En la actualidad, el mundo del manga y el anime es uno de los fenómenos de cultura popular que, aunque nacido y desarrollado en Japón, supera las estrictas fronteras creativas y comunicativas de su país de origen. Es auténtica y genuinamente global. Con ocasión del Salón del Manga y la Cultura Japonesa de Alicante, se propone acercar al diálogo, a veces imperceptible para el lector/espectador europeo, entre el manga y el anime moderno y la mitología japonesa, en particular, fijando (...)
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Motoori Norinaga
  1. Materialien und Auswahlbibliographie zur japanischsprachigen Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung.Leon Krings - 2017 - In Rolf Elberfeld (ed.), Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung in globaler Perspektive (Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie Bd. 9). Hamburg, Deutschland: pp. 341-364.
    Selected Bibiliography and Overview of Japanese Philosophy by reference to major Japanese Anthologies of Traditional and Modern Japanese Thought / Philosophy, listing a wide range of Japanese philosophers and thinkers from ancient times to the present.
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19th Century Japanese Philosophy
  1. Los primeros años de la irrupción de la filosofía en Japón. Un análisis del texto de Kishinami Tsunezo The development of Philosophy in Japan (1915).Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2008 - EuskadiAsia.
    RESUMEN En el año 1965, Dale RIEPE realizó una cronología de obras de Filosofía Japonesa en la que encontramos referenciada la tesis doctoral de KISHINAMI Tsunezo, aceptada el año 1914 en la Universidad de Princeton y publicada en el 1915 con el título The Development of Philosophy in Japan. En la disertación de Kishinami encontramos varios aspectos que consideramos interesantes para analizar la recepción de un tipo de conocimiento, la filosofía, que en principio se entendió como “importado” de Occidente y (...)
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  2. Comiendo de la fruta prohibida. La filosofía en la Era Meiji (1868-1912).Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2008 - EuskadiAsia.
    Conferencia JORNADAS EUSKADIASIA. EXPERIENCIAS DE LO LEJANO: JAPÓN EN PERSPECTIVA.
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  3. Intercambios filosóficos entre Japón y Europa.Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2013 - Departamento Arte y Humanidades- Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.
    Cuestiones alrededor de los intercambios filosóficos entre Japón y Europa.
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  4. Maraldo, John: "Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida". [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2019 - 西田哲学会年報 16:153-145.
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Samurai Philosophy
  1. Nitobe and Royce: Bushidō and the Philosophy of Loyalty.Mathew A. Foust - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1174-1193.
    In recent years, scholars have increasingly paid attention to the philosophy of Josiah Royce. Long lost in the shadow of fellow classical American figures, Royce’s philosophy has enjoyed a renascence, with a spate of publications in a variety of venues studying and applying his thought.1 Like his philosophical brethren, Royce wrote on a wide variety of subjects, his discussions underpinned by a smattering of influences. Much has been remarked of the various Western sources that made an impression on Royce’s thought, (...)
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20th Century Japanese Philosophy
  1. Los primeros años de la irrupción de la filosofía en Japón. Un análisis del texto de Kishinami Tsunezo The development of Philosophy in Japan (1915).Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2008 - EuskadiAsia.
    RESUMEN En el año 1965, Dale RIEPE realizó una cronología de obras de Filosofía Japonesa en la que encontramos referenciada la tesis doctoral de KISHINAMI Tsunezo, aceptada el año 1914 en la Universidad de Princeton y publicada en el 1915 con el título The Development of Philosophy in Japan. En la disertación de Kishinami encontramos varios aspectos que consideramos interesantes para analizar la recepción de un tipo de conocimiento, la filosofía, que en principio se entendió como “importado” de Occidente y (...)
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  2. Comiendo de la fruta prohibida. La filosofía en la Era Meiji (1868-1912).Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2008 - EuskadiAsia.
    Conferencia JORNADAS EUSKADIASIA. EXPERIENCIAS DE LO LEJANO: JAPÓN EN PERSPECTIVA.
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Kyoto School
  1. Watsuji, Intentionality, and Psychopathology.Joel Krueger - 2020 - Philosophy East and West 70 (3):757-780.
    Despite increasing interest in the work of Tetsuro Watsuji, his discussion of intentionality remains underexplored. I here develop an interpretation and application of his view. First, I unpack Watsuji’s arguments for the inherently social character of intentionality, consider how they connect with his more general discussion of embodiment and betweenness, and then situate his view alongside phenomenologists like Husserl, Heidegger, and Merleau-Ponty. Next, I argue that Watsuji’s characterization of the social character of intentionality is relevant to current discussions in phenomenological (...)
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  2. Materialien und Auswahlbibliographie zur japanischsprachigen Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung.Leon Krings - 2017 - In Rolf Elberfeld (ed.), Philosophiegeschichtsschreibung in globaler Perspektive (Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie Bd. 9). Hamburg, Deutschland: pp. 341-364.
    Selected Bibiliography and Overview of Japanese Philosophy by reference to major Japanese Anthologies of Traditional and Modern Japanese Thought / Philosophy, listing a wide range of Japanese philosophers and thinkers from ancient times to the present.
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Nishida Kitarō
  1. Los deseos del yo. Un acercamiento a la teoría ética de Nishida Kitarô.Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2010 - EuskadiaAsia.
    Conferencia Festival Internacional de Japón (Bilbao, Noviembre de 2010) .
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  2. Intercambios filosóficos entre Japón y Europa.Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2013 - Departamento Arte y Humanidades- Universitat Oberta de Catalunya.
    Cuestiones alrededor de los intercambios filosóficos entre Japón y Europa.
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  3. Takeuti's Proof Theory in the Context of the Kyoto School.Andrew Arana - 2019 - Jahrbuch Für Philosophie Das Tetsugaku-Ronso 46:1-17.
    Gaisi Takeuti (1926–2017) is one of the most distinguished logicians in proof theory after Hilbert and Gentzen. He extensively extended Hilbert's program in the sense that he formulated Gentzen's sequent calculus, conjectured that cut-elimination holds for it (Takeuti's conjecture), and obtained several stunning results in the 1950–60s towards the solution of his conjecture. Though he has been known chiefly as a great mathematician, he wrote many papers in English and Japanese where he expressed his philosophical thoughts. In particular, he used (...)
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  4. Nishida Kitarō’s Kōiteki Chokkan: Active Intuition and Contemporary Metaethics.Laura Specker Sullivan - forthcoming - In Colin Marshall (ed.), Comparative Metaethics: Neglected Perspectives on the Foundations of Morality. Routledge.
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  5. Maraldo, John: "Japanese Philosophy in the Making 1: Crossing Paths with Nishida". [REVIEW]Leon Krings - 2019 - 西田哲学会年報 16:153-145.
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  6. Relocating the Figure of Jikaku (Self-Consciousness) in Nishida’s Intuition and Reflection in Self-Consciousness (1917).Montserrat Crespin Perales - 2012 - In Toru Arakawa (ed.), Practicing Japanese Philosophy. Mind and Activity. Tokio, Japón: pp. 34-57.
    Relocating the figure of Jikaku (Self-Consciousness) in Nishida’s Intuition and Reflection in Self-consciousness.
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  7. The Idea of the Mirror in Dōgen and Nishida.Michel Dalissier - 2006 - In James W. Heisig (ed.), Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1. Nagoya: Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture. pp. 99-142.
    The image of the “mirror” (鏡kagami) appears frequently in the philosophical texts of Nishida Kitaro (西田幾多郎1870-1945), where it assumes various functions. Mirror references first occur in meditations on the philosophies of Josiah Royce (1855-1916) and Henri Bergson (1859-1941). The most fascinating evocation here corresponds to the idea of a “self-enlightening mirror”, used to probe the philosophical ground for self-illumination. This idea seems to point back to Buddhist meaning that intervenes in Japanese intellectual history. We take this as our warrant for (...)
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  8. Frontiers of Japanese Philosophy Vol.1.W. Heisig James (ed.) - 2006 - Nanzan Institute for Religion & Culture.
    Thirteen scholars gather together to discuss current issues in Japanese philosophy, critically examine its ongoing dialogue with Western philosophy, and open new questions for future research.
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  9. Nishida Kitarō: “Der Geschichtliche Leib”.Leon Krings - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:217-246.
    Original title : 「歴史的身体」『西田幾多郎全集』[Nishida Kitarō Gesamtausgabe], 3. Auflage, Tokyo, Iwanami Shoten, Bd. 14: 265–92.
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  10. Die Individuelle Selbsterschaffung der Geschichtlichen Welt Und der Staat: “Staat” Und “Volk” in der Philosophie Nishida Kitarōs.Yūjin Itabashi - 2016 - European Journal of Japanese Philosophy 1:75-106.
    Originally published as「歴史的世界の個性的な自己創造と国家:西田哲学における〈国家〉と〈民族〉」, in「西田哲学会年報第七号」[ Jahrbuch der Nishida-Gesellschaft] 7 : 55–76. Übersetzt von Leon Krings. In diesem Aufsatz wird der Frage nachgegangen, in welcher Weise der „Staat“ im späten Denken des Philosophen Nishida Kitarō thematisiert wird. Dies geschieht anhand der Staatstheorie Nishidas, wie sie sich in seinen Aufsätzen Das Problem der Staatsraison und Das Problem der japanischen Kultur sowie im Anhang zur Philosophischen Aufsatzsammlung iv darstellt. Zusätzlich werden Nishidas Schriften, die nach den Grundproblemen der Philosophie geschrieben wurden und den theoretischen Hintergrund (...)
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  11. Anselms Proslogion, “nichts” gegen Nishida und Heidegger.Manfred Gawlina - 2013 - Argument: Biannual Philosophical Journal 3 (2):285-300.
    Co jest większe, bycie czy nic? Anzelm dowodzi istnienia Boga przy pomocy nihil. Bóg jako to, od czego nic większego nie może zostać pomyślane przez skończony umysł. Właściwe dla Anzelma logiczne – i być może mistyczne – użycie słowa „nic” domaga się porównania z negatywną ontologią Heideggera i jej recepcją w ramach tzw. Szkoły z Kioto założonej przez Nishidę. Czyż jednak pustka buddyzmu zen nie odsyła nas do – niewypowiedzianej – boskiej obecności?
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  12. William James and Kitaro Nishida on “Pure Experience”, Consciousness, and Moral Psychology.Joel Krueger - 2007 - Dissertation, Purdue University
    The question “What is the nature of experience?” is of perennial philosophical concern. It deals not only with the nature of experience qua experience, but additionally with related questions about the experiencing subject and that which is experienced. In other words, to speak of the philosophical problem of experience, one must also address questions about mind, world, and the various relations that link them together. Both William James and Kitarō Nishida were deeply concerned with these issues. Their shared notion of (...)
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  13. The "Place of Nothing" in Nishida as Chiasma and Chōra.John Krummel - 2015 - Diaphany 1 (1):203-240.
    The paper will explicate the Sache or matter of the dialectic of the founder of Kyoto School philosophy, Nishida Kitarō (1870-1945), from the standpoint of his mature thought, especially from the 1930s and 40s. Rather than providing a simple exposition of his thought I will engage in a creative reading of his concept of basho (place) in terms of chiasma and chōra, or a chiasmatic chōra. I argue that Nishida’s appropriation of nineteenth century German, especially Hegelian, terminology was inadequate in (...)
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  14. World, Nothing, and Globalization in Nishida and Nancy.John Krummel - 2014 - In Leah Kalmanson James Mark Shields (ed.), Buddhist Responses to Globalization. pp. 107-129.
    The “shrinking” of the globe in the last few centuries has made explicit that the world is a tense unity of many: the many worlds are forced to contend with one another. Nishida Kitarō, the founder of the Kyoto school, once stated that to be is to be implaced. We exist by partaking in “the socio-historical world.” More recently, Jean-luc Nancy has conceived of the world in terms of sense. What is striking in both is that the world emerges out (...)
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  15. Anontology and the Issue of Being and Nothing in Nishida Kitarō.John Krummel - 2014 - In JeeLoo Liu Douglas L. Berger (ed.), Nothingness in Asian Philosophy. pp. 263-283.
    This chapter will explicate what Nishida means by “nothing” (mu, 無), as well as “being” (yū, 有), through an exposition of his concept of the “place of nothing” (mu no basho). We do so through an investigation of his exposition of “the place of nothing” vis-àvis the self, the world, and God, as it shows up in his epistemology, metaphysics, theology and religious ethics during the various periods of his oeuvre – in other words, his understanding of nothingness that he (...)
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  16. The Unsolved Issue of Consciousness.Nishida Kitarō & John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1):44-51.
    This essay by Nishida Kitarō from 1927, translated into English here for the first time, is from the initial period of what has come to be called “Nishida philosophy” (Nishida tetsugaku), when Nishida was first developing his conception of “place” (basho). Nishida here inquires into the relationship between logic and consciousness in terms of place and implacement in order to overcome the shortcomings of previous philosophical attempts—from the ancient Greeks to the moderns—to dualistically conceive the relationship between being and knowing (...)
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  17. The Unsolved Issue of ConsciousnessThe Unsolved Issue of Consciousness.Nishida Kitarō & John W. M. Krummel - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (1).
    The following essay, “The Unsolved Issue of Consciousness” (Torinokosaretaru ishiki no mondai 取残されたる意識の問題), by Nishida Kitarō 西田幾多郎 from 1927 is significant in regard to the development of what has come to be called “Nishida philosophy” (Nishida tetsugaku 西田哲学). In what follows, in addition to providing some commentary on the important points of his essay, I would like to show its relevance or significance not only for those who would like to study Nishida’s thought but also for philosophy in general, especially (...)
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  18. The Varieties of Pure Experience: William James and Kitaro Nishida on Consciousness and Embodiment.Joel Krueger - 2006 - William James Studies 1.
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  19. The Originary Wherein: Heidegger and Nishida on the Sacred and the Religious.John W. M. Krummel - 2010 - Research in Phenomenology 40 (3):378-407.
    In this paper, I explore a possible convergence between two great twentieth century thinkers, Nishida Kitarō of Japan and Martin Heidegger of Germany. The focus is on the quasi-religious language they employ in discussing the grounding of human existence in terms of an encompassing Wherein for our being. Heidegger speaks of “the sacred” and “the passing of the last god” that mark an empty clearing wherein all metaphysical absolutes or gods have withdrawn but are simultaneously indicative of an opening wherein (...)
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  20. Nishida, Agency, and the 'Self-Contradictory' Body.Joel W. Krueger - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):213 – 229.
    In this essay, I investigate Kitarō Nishida's characterization of what he refers to as the 'self-contradictory' body. First, I clarify the conceptual relation between the self-contradictory body and Nishida's notion of 'acting-intuition'. I next look at Nishida's analysis of acting-intuition and the self-contradictory body as it pertains to our personal, sensorimotor engagement with the world and things in it, as well as to our bodily immersion within the intersubjective and social world. Along the way, I argue that Nishida develops a (...)
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  21. Thinking in Transition: Nishida Kitaro and Martin Heidegger.Elmar Weinmayr, tr Krummel, John W. M. & Douglas Ltr Berger - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (2):232-256.
    : Two major philosophers of the twentieth century, the German existential phenomenologist Martin Heidegger and the seminal Japanese Kyoto School philosopher Nishida Kitarō are examined here in an attempt to discern to what extent their ideas may converge. Both are viewed as expressing, each through the lens of his own tradition, a world in transition with the rise of modernity in the West and its subsequent globalization. The popularity of Heidegger's thought among Japanese philosophers, despite its own admitted limitation to (...)
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Miki Kiyoshi
  1. Myth.Kiyoshi Miki & John Krummel - 2016 - Social Imaginaries 2 (1):25-69.
    “Myth” comprises the first chapter of the book, The Logic of the Imagination, by Miki Kiyoshi. In this chapter Miki analyzes the significance of myth (shinwa) as possessing a certain reality despite being “fictions.” He begins by broadening the meaning of the imagination to argue for a logic of the imagination that involves expressive action or poiesis (production) in general, of which myth is one important product. The imagination gathers in myth material from the environing world lived by the social (...)
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Nishitani Keiji
  1. Ethics of Emptiness East and West: Examining Nishitani, Watsuji and Berdyaev.Anton Luis Sevilla - 2010 - In Shigemi Inaga (ed.), Questioning Oriental Aesthetics and Thinking: Conflicting Visions of "Asia" under the Colonial Empires. International Research Center for Japanese Studies. pp. 237-261.
    This paper hopes to contribute to the contemporary East-West and Buddhist-Christian dialogues through a comparative examination of how ethics is founded upon the notion of emptiness and its analogues in the thought of two Japanese thinkers, Nishitani Keiji (1900-1990) of the Kyoto School of Philosophy, Watsuji Tetsuro (1889-1960), and the Russian Christian existentialist Ni-kolai Berdyaev (1874-1948). By comparing and contrasting Nishitani's notion of double-negation (from the standpoint of being to the standpoint of nihility and to the standpoint of emptiness) and (...)
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