Contents
133 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 133
Material to categorize
  1. Philosophie comme art dans le Protreptique d'Aristote.Refik Güremen - 2020 - In Pierre Pellegrin & Françoise Graziani (eds.), L'HÉRITAGE D'ARISTOTE AUJOURD'HUI : NATURE ET SOCIÉTÉ. Alessandria: Editzioni dell'Orso. pp. 231-247.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Significance of Politics: Adeimantus’ Contribution to the Argument of the Republic.Tushar Irani - manuscript
    This paper reevaluates the role of Adeimantus in Book 2 of Plato's Republic, arguing that his challenge to Socrates' view of justice—specifically, his interest in the influence of the outer world on our inner lives—serves a crucial yet underappreciated purpose in initiating the political project of the work. I suggest that it's due to Adeimantus' contribution in the Republic that Plato's wide-ranging inquiry into issues in ethics, politics, psychology, epistemology, and metaphysics hangs together as an integrated whole. A further benefit (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Plato's The Allegory of the Cave.Irfan Ajvazi - manuscript
    The main idea of this allegory is the difference between people who simply experience their sensory experiences, and call that knowledge, and those who understand real knowledge by seeing the truth. The allegory actually digs into some deep philosophy, which is not surprising since it comes from Plato. Its main idea is the discussion of how humans perceive reality and if human existence has a higher truth. It explores the theme of belief versus knowledge. The Perception Plato theorizes that the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Platon’da Bilgi, Öğrenme ve Ruhun Ölümsüzlüğü.Soner Soysal - 2022 - İzmir, Turkey: Serüven Yayınevi.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. PLATON’DA TANRI VE EVRENİN OLUŞUMU.Gamze Kaynak - 2018 - Dissertation, Süleyman Demi̇rel Üni̇versi̇tesi̇
    Main purpose of this work is to state the ideas of Plato about God, the universe, and the creation of universe. While explaining about his ideas on this subject, not only his time, but also ideas of the philosophers preceding him are taken into consideration. It also includes usual views and belief systems about the God, the universe and the creation of universe during his time. Thus, we had a chance to examine Plato’s ideas about our subject in detail. Our (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. On Socrates' Project of Philosophical Conversion.Jacob Stump - 2020 - Philosophers' Imprint 20 (32):1-19.
    There is a wide consensus among scholars that Plato’s Socrates is wrong to trust in reason and argument as capable of converting people to the life of philosophy. In this paper, I argue for the opposite. I show that Socrates employs a more sophisticated strategy than is typically supposed. Its key component is the use of philosophical argument not to lead an interlocutor to rationally conclude that he must change his way of life but rather to cause a certain affective (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Plato's Gymnastic Dialogues.Heather Reid - 2020 - In Mark Ralkowski Heather Reid (ed.), Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato. Sioux City, IA, USA: pp. 15-30.
    It is not mere coincidence that several of Plato’s dialogues are set in gymnasia and palaistrai (wrestling schools), employ the gymnastic language of stripping, wrestling, tripping, even helping opponents to their feet, and imitate in argumentative form the athletic contests (agōnes) commonly associated with that place. The main explanation for this is, of course, historical. Sophists, orators, and intellectuals of all stripes, including the historical Socrates, really did frequent Athens’ gymnasia and palaistrai in search of ready audiences and potential students. (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  8. Wrestling with the Eleatics in Plato's Parmenides.Heather Reid & Lidia Palumbo - 2020 - In Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato. Sioux City, IA, USA: pp. 185-198.
    This paper interprets the Parmenides agonistically as a constructive contest between Plato’s Socrates and the Eleatics of Western Greece. Not only is the dialogue set in the agonistic context of the Panathenaic Games, it features agonistic language, employs an agonistic method, and may even present an agonistic model for participation in the forms. The inspiration for this agonistic motif may be that Parmenides and his student Zeno represent Western Greece, which was a key rival for the mainland at the Olympics (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Athletics, Gymnastics, and Agon in Plato.Heather Reid, Mark Ralkowski & Coleen P. Zoller (eds.) - 2020 - Sioux City, IA, USA: Parnassos Press.
    In the Panathenaic Games, there was a torch race for teams of ephebes that started from the altars of Eros and Prometheus at Plato’s Academy and finished on the Acropolis at the altar of Athena, goddess of wisdom. It was competitive, yes, but it was also sacred, aimed at a noble goal. To win, you needed to cooperate with your teammates and keep the delicate flame alive as you ran up the hill. Likewise, Plato’s philosophy combines competition and cooperation in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Suggestions On How To Combine The Platonic Forms To Overcome The Interpretative Difficulties Of The Parmenides Dialogue.Gerardo Óscar Matía Cubillo - 2021 - Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad de Costa Rica 60 (156):157-171.
    This paper provides an original approach to research on the logical processes that determine how certain forms participate in others. By introducing the concept of relational participation, the problems of self-referentiality of the Platonic forms can be dealt with more effectively. Applying this to the forms of likeness and unlikeness in Parmenides 132d-133a reveals a possible way to resolve different versions of the Third Man Argument. The method of generating numbers from oddness and evenness may also be of interest; relational (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Hippocrates at phaedrus 270c.Elizabeth Jelinek & Nickolas Pappas - 2020 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 101 (3):409-430.
    At Plato’s Phaedrus 270c, Socrates asks whether one can know souls without knowing ‘the whole.’ Phaedrus answers that ‘according to Hippocrates’ the same demand on knowing the whole applies to bodies. What parallel is intended between soul-knowledge and body-knowledge and which medical passages illustrate the analogy have been much debated. Three dominant interpretations read ‘the whole’ as respectively (1) environment, (2) kosmos, and (3) individual soul or body; and adduce supporting Hippocratic passages. But none of these interpretations accounts for the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed.David Ebrey & Richard Kraut (eds.) - 2022 - Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
    Contributors in the order of contributions: David Ebrey, Richard Kraut, T. H. Irwin, Leonard Brandwood, Eric Brown, Agnes Callard, Gail Fine, Suzanne Obdrzalek, Gábor Betegh, Elizabeth Asmis, Henry Mendell, Constance C. Meinwald, Michael Frede, Emily Fletcher, Verity Harte, Rachana Kamtekar, and Rachel Singpurwalla. -/- The first edition of the Cambridge Companion to Plato (1992), edited by Richard Kraut, shaped scholarly research and guided new students for thirty years. This new edition introduces students to fresh approaches to Platonic dialogues while advancing (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Plato's Socrates and his Conception of Philosophy.Eric Brown - 2022 - In David Ebrey & Richard Kraut (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Plato, 2nd ed. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. pp. 117-145.
    This is a study of Plato's use of the character Socrates to model what philosophy is. The study focuses on the Apology, and finds that philosophy there is the love of wisdom, where wisdom is expertise about how to live, of the sort that only gods can fully have, and where Socrates loves wisdom in three ways, first by honoring wisdom as the gods' possession, testing human claims to it, second by pursuing wisdom, examining himself as he examines others, to (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  14. The Psychagogic Work of Examples in Plato's Statesman.Holly G. Moore - 2016 - Philosophy and Rhetoric 49 (3):300-322.
    This paper concerns the role of examples (paradeigmata) as propaedeutic to philosophical inquiry, in light of the methodological digression of Plato’s Statesman. Consistent with scholarship on Aristotle’s view of example, scholars of Plato’s work have privileged the logic of example over their rhetorical appeal to the soul of the learner. Following a small but significant trend in recent rhetorical scholarship that emphasizes the affective nature of examples, this essay assesses the psychagogic potential of paradeigmata, following the discussion of example in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. By what is the soul nourished? - On the art of the physician of souls in Plato’s Protagoras.Jens Kristian Larsen - 2016 - In Olof Pettersson & Vigdis Songe-Møller (eds.), Plato’s Protagoras: Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry. Cham: Springer. pp. 79-97.
    This article explores the motif of psychic nourishment in Plato’s Protagoras. It does so by analyzing what consequences Socrates’ claim that only a physician of souls will be able adequately to assess the quality of such nourishment has for the argument of the dialogue. To this purpose, the first section of the article offers a detailed analysis of Socrates’ initial conversation with Hippocrates, highlighting and interpreting the various uses of medical metaphors. Building on this, this section argues that the warning (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Science de l’entrelacement des formes, science suprême, science des hommes libres : la dialectique dans le Sophiste 253b-254b.Nicolas Zaks - 2017 - Elenchos 38 (1-2):61-81.
    Despite intensive exegetical work, Plato’s description of dialectic in the Sophist still raises many questions. Through a close reading of this passage that contextualizes it in the general organisation of the Sophist, this paper provides answers to these questions. After presenting the difficult text, I contend that the “vowel-kinds” are necessary conditions for the blending of kinds. Then, I interpret the “cause of divisions” mentioned by the Stranger as the kinds responsible of the dichotomous division in the first half of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. The Timaeus and the Longer Way.Mitchell Miller - 2003 - In Gretchen J. Reydams-Schils (ed.), Plato's Timaeus as Cultural Icon. University of Notre Dame Press. pp. 17-59.
    A study of the significance of Plato's resumption of the simile of model and likeness in the Timaeus, with attention to the place of the Timaeus in the "longer way" that Plato has Socrates announce in the Republic. The reader embarked on the "longer way," I argue, will find in the accounts of the elements and of the kinds of animals unannounced but detailed exhibitions of the "god-given" method of dialectic that Plato has Socrates announce in the Philebus.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  18. Dialectic of Awakening : Buddha, Plato, an Aristotle.Stefan Schindler - manuscript
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Review Essay: Miller On Sayre On Metaphysics And Method In Plato’s Statesman. [REVIEW]Mitchell Miller - 2007 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 7.
    Sayre finds deep connections between collection and division, the two kinds of measure distinguished in the Statesman, the conceptions of Limit and Unlimited in the Philebus, and the Dyad that Aristotle reports was a key principle in the "unwritten teachings." The Stranger's dialectical account of statesmanship practices due measure; by "cutting down the middle," the Stranger shows how Forms — understood as Limits as, in turn, "numbers in the sense of measures" — "mark off a middle ground between [the] extremes (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. A New Philosophical Tool in the Meno: 86e-87c.David Ebrey - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):75-96.
    I argue that the technique Socrates describes in the Meno at 86e-87c allows him to make progress without definitions, even while accepting that definitions are necessary for knowledge. Some contend that the technique involves provisionally accepting a claim. I argue, instead, that it provides a secure biconditional that one can use to reduce the question one cares care about to a new question that one thinks will be easier to answer.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
Plato: Why Dialogues?
  1. Cancel Culture, Then and Now: A Platonic Approach to the Shaming of People and the Exclusion of Ideas.Douglas R. Campbell - 2023 - Journal of Cyberspace Studies 7 (2):147-166.
    In this article, I approach some phenomena seen predominantly on social-media sites that are grouped together as cancel culture with guidance from two major themes in Plato’s thought. In the first section, I argue that shame can play a constructive and valuable role in a person’s improvement, just as we see Socrates throughout Plato’s dialogues use shame to help his interlocutors improve. This insight can help us understand the value of shaming people online for, among other things, their morally reprehensible (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Mito y filosofía en el Gorgias, el Fedón y la República.Danilo Tapia - 2011 - Dissertation, Pontificia Universidad Católica Del Perú
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3. Protreptic and Apotreptic: Aristotle's dialogue Protrepticus.Monte Johnson - 2018 - In Olʹga Alieva, Annemaré Kotzé & Sophie van der Meeren (eds.), When Wisdom Calls: Philosophical Protreptic in Antiquity. Turnhout, Belgium: Brepols Publishers. pp. 111-154.
    This paper has three major aims. The first is to defend the hypothesis that Aristotle’s lost work Protrepticus was a dialogue. The second is to explore the genres of ancient apotreptics, speeches that argue against doing philosophy and show the need for protreptic responses; our exploration is guided by Aristotle’s own analysis of apotreptics as well as protreptics in his Rhetorica. The third aim is to restore to the evidence base of Aristotle’s Protrepticus an apotreptic speech that argues against doing (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Grenzen des Gesprächs über Ideen. Die Formen des Wissens und die Notwendigkeit der Ideen in Platons "Parmenides".Gregor Damschen - 2003 - In Gregor Damschen, Rainer Enskat & Alejandro G. Vigo (eds.), Platon und Aristoteles – sub ratione veritatis. Festschrift für Wolfgang Wieland zum 70. Geburtstag. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht. pp. 31-75.
    Limits of the Conversation about Forms. Types of Knowledge and Necessity of Forms in Plato's "Parmenides". - Forms (ideas) are among the things that Plato is serious about. But about these things he says in his "Seventh Letter": "There neither is nor ever will be a treatise of mine on the subject." (341c, transl. J. Harward). Plato's statement suggests the question, why one does not and never can do justice to the Platonic forms by means of a written text about (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  5. Das Prinzip des performativen Widerspruchs. Zur epistemologischen Bedeutung der Dialogform in Platons "Euthydemos".Gregor Damschen - 1999 - Méthexis 12 (1):89–101.
    The principle of performative contradiction. On the epistemological significance of the dialogue form in Plato's "Euthydemus". - In this study, an analysis of the section 285d-288a of Plato's "Euthydemus" shall show two things: (1) The sophistic model of a world in which there is no contradiction, in which every linguistic utterance is true and every action correct, has no semantic inconsistencies, but can only be rejected with the help of the principle of performative contradictions. (2) It is precisely these performative (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
Plato: Socratic Irony
  1. A Eironeía de Sócrates e a Ironia de Platão nos primeiros diálogos.Antônio José Vieira de Queirós Campos - 2016 - Dissertation, Puc-Rio, Brazil
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Litotes, Irony and other Innocent Lies.Ignace Haaz - 2018 - Globethics Global Series No. 16.
    In the following text we would like to present the philosophical discussion on untrusting lies, which introduces a space for innocent lie understood as figurative manipulation of the speech: a poetic trope that we would argue could not only be generously used to help us tolerating our sometime deceiving human condition—which is global and universally ours, that of the finitude of human capacity of knowledge and ethical action—but also to maximise our capacity for knowledge formation and adaptation to values. Concepts (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Retoryczność platońskiej "Obrony Sokratesa" (Rhetorical analysis of Plato's "Apology of Socrates").Zbigniew Nerczuk - 2005 - Studia Antyczne I Mediewistyczne 3:43-48.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Laughing to Learn: Irony in the Republic as Pedagogy.Jonathan Fine - 2011 - Polis 28 (2):235-49.
    [Condensed abstract] Socrates' ironic use of 'makaria' (blessedness) in the Republic exhorts Glaucon to think more critically. Certain features of the supposedly ideal city, motivated by Glaucon's character, may be protreptic for Glaucon to practice philosophical courage and intellectual moderation.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Socrates Agonistes: The Case of the Cratylus Etymologies.Rachel Barney - 1998 - Oxford Studies in Ancient Philosophy 16:63-98.
    Are the long, wildly inventive etymologies in Plato’s Cratylus just some kind of joke, or does Plato himself accept them? This standard question misses the most important feature of the etymologies: they are a competitive performance, an agôn by Socrates in which he shows that he can play the game of etymologists like Cratylus better than they can themselves. Such show-off performances are a recurrent feature of Platonic dialogue: they include Socrates’ speeches on eros in the Phaedrus, his rhetorical discourse (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
Plato: Elenchos
  1. How to Defend the Law of Non-Contradiction without Incurring the Dialetheist’s Charge of (Viciously) Begging the Question.Marco Simionato - 2024 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 31 (2):141-182.
    According to some critics, Aristotle’s elenctic defence (elenchos, elenchus) of the Law of Non-Contradiction (Metaphysics IV) would be ineffective because it viciously begs the question. After briefly recalling the elenctic refutation of the denier of the Law of Non-Contradiction, I will first focus on Filippo Costantini’s objection to the elenchus, which, in turn, is based on the dialetheic account of negation developed by Graham Priest. Then, I will argue that there is at least one reading of the elenchus that might (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Plato, Sophist 259C7–D7: Contrary Predication and Genuine Refutation.John D. Proios - 2023 - Classical Quarterly 73 (1):66-77.
    This paper defends an interpretation of Plato, Soph. 259c7–d7, which describes a distinction between genuine and pretender forms of ‘examination’ or ‘refutation’ (ἔλεγχος). The passage speaks to a need, throughout the dialogue, to differentiate the truly philosophical method from the merely eristic method. But its contribution has been obscured by the appearance of a textual problem at 259c7–8. As a result, scholars have largely not recognized that the Eleatic Stranger recommends accepting contrary predication as a condition of genuine refutation. After (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Cancel Culture, Then and Now: A Platonic Approach to the Shaming of People and the Exclusion of Ideas.Douglas R. Campbell - 2023 - Journal of Cyberspace Studies 7 (2):147-166.
    In this article, I approach some phenomena seen predominantly on social-media sites that are grouped together as cancel culture with guidance from two major themes in Plato’s thought. In the first section, I argue that shame can play a constructive and valuable role in a person’s improvement, just as we see Socrates throughout Plato’s dialogues use shame to help his interlocutors improve. This insight can help us understand the value of shaming people online for, among other things, their morally reprehensible (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. 8 The Socratic Elenchos?Gary Alan Scott (ed.) - 2002 - University Park, PA: Penn State Press.
    Responds to two other chapters that describe what they identify as the "Socratic Method." Our claim is that the elenchos is not sufficiently methodical as to qualify as a "method.".
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. The Philosothon: Philosophy as performance.Simon Kidd - 2022 - Journal of Philosophy in Schools 9 (2):41-77.
    This paper addresses the question of the place for competition in philosophy by considering the example of the Philosothon, a popular school-based philosophy competition originating in Western Australia. Criticisms of this competition typically focus either on specific procedural problems, or else on the claim that the competitive spirit is inimical to collaborative philosophical inquiry. The former type of criticism is extrinsic to competitive philosophy per se, while the latter is intrinsic to it. Defenders of the Philosothon dismiss both types of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Socratic Methods.Eric Brown - 2024 - In Russell E. Jones, Ravi Sharma & Nicholas D. Smith (eds.), The Bloomsbury Handbook of Socrates. Bloomsbury Handbooks. pp. 45-62.
    This selective and opinionated overview of English-language scholarship on the philosophical method(s) of Plato's Socrates discusses whether this Socrates has any expertise or method, how he examines others and why, and how he exhorts others to care about wisdom and the state of their soul.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. A Eironeía de Sócrates e a Ironia de Platão nos primeiros diálogos.Antônio José Vieira de Queirós Campos - 2016 - Dissertation, Puc-Rio, Brazil
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Socrates vs. Callicles: examination & ridicule in Plato’s Gorgias.David Levy - 2013 - Plato Journal 13:27-36.
    The Callicles colloquy of Plato’s Gorgias features both examination and ridicule. Insofar as Socrates’ examination of Callicles proceeds via the elenchus, the presence of ridicule requires explanation. This essay seeks to provide that explanation by placing the effort to ridicule within the effort to examine; that is, the judgment/pronouncement that something/ someone is worthy of ridicule is a proper part of the elenchic examination. Standard accounts of the Socratic elenchus do not include this component. Hence, the argument of this essay (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  9. Socrates' rationality.Erik Nis Ostenfeld - 2019 - Acts of Plato Conference (Aigis 19,1).
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Graph of Socratic Elenchos.John Bova - manuscript
    From my ongoing "Metalogical Plato" project. The aim of the diagram is to make reasonably intuitive how the Socratic elenchos (the logic of refutation applied to candidate formulations of virtues or ruling knowledges) looks and works as a whole structure. This is my starting point in the project, in part because of its great familiarity and arguable claim to being the inauguration of western philosophy; getting this point less wrong would have broad and deep consequences, including for philosophy’s self-understanding. -/- (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Das Prinzip des performativen Widerspruchs. Zur epistemologischen Bedeutung der Dialogform in Platons "Euthydemos".Gregor Damschen - 1999 - Méthexis 12 (1):89–101.
    The principle of performative contradiction. On the epistemological significance of the dialogue form in Plato's "Euthydemus". - In this study, an analysis of the section 285d-288a of Plato's "Euthydemus" shall show two things: (1) The sophistic model of a world in which there is no contradiction, in which every linguistic utterance is true and every action correct, has no semantic inconsistencies, but can only be rejected with the help of the principle of performative contradictions. (2) It is precisely these performative (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Socratic Elenchus in the Sophist.Nicolas Zaks - 2018 - Apeiron 51 (4):371-390.
    This paper demonstrates the central role of the Socratic elenchus in the Sophist. In the first part, I defend the position that the Stranger describes the Socratic elenchus in the sixth division of the Sophist. In the second part, I show that the Socratic elenchus is actually used when the Stranger scrutinizes the accounts of being put forward by his predecessors. In the final part, I explain the function of the Socratic elenchus in the argument of the dialogue. By contrast (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  13. Cross-Examining Socrates. [REVIEW]Jyl Gentzler - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (4):587-590.
    A review of John Beversluis' "Cross-Examining Socrates: A Defense of the Interlocutors in Plato's Early Dialogues".
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  14. The Pleasures of the Comic and of Socratic Inquiry.Mitchell Miller - 2008 - Arethusa 41 (2):263-289.
    At Apology 33c Socrates explains that "some people enjoy … my company" because "they … enjoy hearing those questioned who think they are wise but are not." At Philebus 48a-50b he makes central to his account of the pleasure of laughing at comedy the exposé of the self-ignorance of those who presume themselves wise. Does the latter passage explain the pleasure of watching Socrates at work? I explore this by tracing the admixture of pain, the causes, and the "natural harmony" (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  15. Ideology, Socratic elenchus, and Inglourious Basterds.Ian Schnee - 2013 - Film and Philosophy 17:1-22.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Plato's Use of Eleusinian Mystery Motifs.Anne Mary Farrell - 1999 - Dissertation, The University of Texas at Austin
    The Eleusinian Mysteries are religious rituals that include rites of initiation, purification, and revelation. The high point of these Mysteries is the moment when a priest reveals the secret of the Mysteries to the newly initiated. Plato frequently uses language and motifs from the Mysteries in his dialogues, yet Plato scholars have not paid much attention to this usage, and those who have done so have not found much philosophical significance in it. I argue that in explaining his epistemology in (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Recollection and the Problem of the Socratic Elenchus.Jyl Gentzler - 1994 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10:257-95.
    We simply cannot make sense of Socrates' procedure for cross-examining his interlocutors in the early dialogues if we insist that Socrates uses cross-examination only for the purpose of testing his interlocutor's claim to knowledge. This view of Socratic cross-examination cannot explain the fact that Socrates examines theses that he himself proposes and that neither he nor his interlocutor explicitly endorses. In contrast,the supposition that Socrates is inquiring on these occasions provides a good explanation for his procedure. When one is attempting (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18. Recollection and the Problem of the Elenchus.Jyl Gentzler - 1994 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):257-295.
    We simply cannot make sense of Socrates' procedure for cross-examining his interlocutors in the early dialogues if we insist that Socrates uses cross-examination only for the purpose of testing his interlocutor's claim to knowledge. This view of Socratic cross-examination cannot explain the fact that Socrates examines theses that he himself proposes and that neither he nor his interlocutor explicitly endorses. In contrast,the supposition that Socrates is inquiring on these occasions provides a good explanation for his procedure. When one is attempting (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  19. How to Discriminate between Experts and Frauds: Some Problems for Socratic Peirastic.Jyl Gentzler - 1995 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 12 (3):227 - 246.
    It has often been noted that Socratic cross-examination is problematic as a method of inquiry, i.e., as a method for 'acquiring' knowledge. Rarely has it been noticed that there are problems with cross-examination when used for the purposes of 'testing' for knowledge. In the 'Charmides', Socrates commits himself to the following principle: In order to discriminate between the person who knows and the person who does not know the subject matter covered by a particular discipline (technê), one must have mastered (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  20. “συμφωνειν” in Plato's Phaedo.Jyl Gentzler - 1991 - Phronesis 36 (3):265 - 276.
    In Socrates' account of his earlier investigations into the nature of causation in the "Phaedo", he describes a method that uses hypotheses. He posited as true those propositions that appeared to harmonize ("sumphonein") with his hypothesis and as false those propositions that failed to harmonize with his hypothesis. Earlier commentators on this passage have maintained that it is impossible to give a univocal reading of the occurrences of "sumphonein"' such that the method that Socrates describes is at all reasonable. It (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
1 — 50 / 133