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  1. added 2020-08-16
    Logical Theatrics, or Floes on Flows: Translating Quine with the Shins.Joshua M. Hall - 2016 - European Journal of Pragmatism and American Philosophy 8 (2).
    I will begin this comparative analysis with Quine, focusing on the front matter and first chapter of Word and Object (alongside From a Logical Point of View and two other short pieces), attempting to illuminate there a (1) basis of excessive, yet familiar, chaos, (2) method of improvised, dramatic distortion, and (3) consequent neo-Pragmatist metaphysics. Having elaborated this Quinian basis, method and metaphysics, I will then show that they can be productively translated into James Mercer’s poetic lyrics for The Shins, (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-20
    Radiohead and Some Questions About Music.Edward Slowik - 2009 - In George Reisch & B. W. Forbes (eds.), Radiohead and Philosophy. Chicago, IL: Open Court: pp. 41-52.
    This essay examines the music of Radiohead as a means of introducing various elementary concepts and theories in the philosophy of music.
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  3. added 2020-05-17
    Sonic Pictures.Jason Leddington - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    Winning essay of the American Society for Aesthetics' inaugural Peter Kivy Prize. Extends Kivy's notion of sonic picturing through engagement with recent work in philosophy of perception. Argues that sonic pictures are more widespread and more aesthetically and artistically important than even Kivy envisioned. Topics discussed include: the nature of sonic pictures; the nature of sounds; what we can (and more importantly, cannot) conclude from musical listening; sonic pictures in film; beatboxing as an art of sonic picturing; and cover songs (...)
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  4. added 2019-10-20
    Group Flow.Tom Cochrane - 2017 - In Micheline Lesaffre, Pieter-Jan Maes & Marc Leman (eds.), The Routledge Companion of Embodied Music Interaction. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 133-140.
    In this chapter I analyse group flow: a state in which performers report intense interpersonal absorption with the music and each other. I compare group flow to individual flow, and argue that the same essential structure can be discerned. I argue that group flow does not justify an anti-representationalist enactivist interpretation. However, I claim that the cognitive task in which the music is produced is irreducibly collective.
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  5. added 2019-10-20
    On the Resistance of the Instrument.Tom Cochrane - 2013 - In Tom Cochrane, Klaus Scherer & Bernardino Fantini (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary perspectives on musical arousal, expression, and social control. Oxford: pp. 75-83.
    I examine the role that the musical instrument plays in shaping a performer's expressive activity and emotional state. I argue that the historical development of the musical instrument has fluctuated between two key values: that of sharing with other musicians, and that of creatively exploring new possibilities. I introduce 'the mood organ'- a sensor-based computer instrument that automatically turns signals of the wearer's emotional state into expressive music.
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  6. added 2019-07-28
    Aesthetics And Popular Art: An Interview With Aaron Meskin.Aaron Meskin - 2010 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 7 (2):1-9.
    As is usually the case with what I work on, I read some stuff I liked. I 1 read an article on comics by Greg Hayman and Henry Pratt and some work on 2 videogames,GrantTavinor’sreallyexcellentworkonthattopic. Ifoundthematerial interesting and I thought I had something to say about it. That’s what usually motivates me and that’s what did in these cases. With comics, my interest in the medium played a big role. I was a child collector of Marvel. I got turned on (...)
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  7. added 2019-02-11
    Signs of Morality in David Bowie's "Black Star" Video Clip.May Kokkidou & Elvina Paschali - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (12).
    “Black Star” music video was released two days before Bowie’s death. It bears various implications of dying and the notion of mortality is both literal and metaphorical. It is highly autobiographical and serves as a theatrical stage for Bowie to act both as a music performer and as a self-conscious human being. In this paper, we discuss the signs of mortality in Bowie’s “Black Star” music video-clip. We focus on video’s cinematic techniques and codes, on its motivic elements and on (...)
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  8. added 2019-01-15
    An Apocalypse of Pop, Pt II: Vox Lux.Paul Bali - manuscript
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  9. added 2019-01-13
    An Apocalypse of Pop, Pt I: Max Martin and the '90s, the Noughts.Paul Bali - manuscript
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  10. added 2018-09-06
    Rock as a Three-Value Tradition.Christopher Bartel - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 75 (2):143-154.
    Gracyk, Kania, and Davies all agree that the rock tradition is distinctive for the central place that it gives to the appreciation of recorded tracks. But we should not be led by those arguments to conclude that the central position of the recorded track makes such appreciation the exclusive interest in rock. I argue that both songwriting and live performance are also central to the rock tradition by showing that the practice of recording tracks admits of a diversity of goals (...)
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  11. added 2017-07-14
    Classic Media Review of Hedwig and the Angry Inch. [REVIEW]Shelley M. Park - 2015 - Queer Studies in Media and Popular Culture 1 (1):125-28.
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  12. added 2015-08-26
    The Metaphysics of Mash‐Ups.Christopher Bartel - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):297-308.
    Accounts of the ontology of musical works seek to uncover what metaphysically speaking a musical work is and how we should identify instances of musical works. In this article, I examine the curious case of the mash-up and seek to address two questions: are mash-ups musical works in their own right and what is the relationship between the mash-up and its source materials? As mash-ups are part of the broader tradition of rock, I situate this discussion within an ontology of (...)
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  13. added 2014-02-27
    Race and the Feminized Popular in Nietzsche and Beyond.Robin James - 2013 - Hypatia 28 (4):749-766.
    I distinguish between the nineteenth- to twentieth-century (modernist) tendency to rehabilitate (white) femininity from the abject popular, and the twentieth- to twenty-first-century (postmodernist) tendency to rehabilitate the popular from abject white femininity. Careful attention to the role of nineteenth-century racial politics in Nietzsche's Gay Science shows that his work uses racial nonwhiteness to counter the supposedly deleterious effects of (white) femininity (passivity, conformity, and so on). This move—using racial nonwhiteness to rescue pop culture from white femininity—is a common twentieth- and (...)
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  14. added 2013-05-10
    Judging Covers.P. D. Magnus, Cristyn Magnus & Christy Mag Uidhir - 2013 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 71 (4):361-370.
    Cover versions form a loose but identifiable category of tracks and performances. We distinguish four kinds of covers and argue that they mark important differences in the modes of evaluation that are possible or appropriate for each: mimic covers, which aim merely to echo the canonical track; rendition covers, which change the sound of the canonical track; transformative covers, which diverge so much as to instantiate a distinct, albeit derivative song; and referential covers, which not only instantiate a distinct song, (...)
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  15. added 2011-11-04
    On Intersectionality and Cultural Appropriation: The Case of Postmillennial Black Hipness.Robin James - 2011 - Journal of Black Masculinity 1 (2).
    Feminist, critical race, and postcolonial theories have established that social identities such as race and gender are mutually constitutive—i.e., that they “intersect.” I argue that “cultural appropriation” is never merely the appropriation of culture, but also of gender, sexuality, class, etc. For example, “white hipness” is the appropriation of stereotypical black masculinity by white males. Looking at recent videos from black male hip-hop artists, I develop an account of “postmillennial black hipness.” The inverse of white hipness, this practice involves the (...)
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  16. added 2011-11-04
    Feminist Aesthetics, Popular Music, and the Politics of the 'Mainstream'.Robin James - 2011 - In L. Ryan Musgrave (ed.), Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art. Springer.
    While feminist aestheticians have long interrogated gendered, raced, and classed hierarchies in the arts, feminist philosophers still don’t talk much about popular music. Even though Angela Davis and bell hooks have seriously engaged popular music, they are often situated on the margins of philosophy. It is my contention that feminist aesthetics has a lot to offer to the study of popular music, and the case of popular music points feminist aesthetics to some of its own limitations and unasked questions. This (...)
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  17. added 2011-03-30
    Deconstruction, Fetishism, and the Racial Contract: On the Politics of "Faking It" in Music.Robin M. James - 2007 - CR 7 (1):45-80.
    I read Sara Kofman's work on Nietzsche, Charles Mills' _The Racial Contract_, and Kodwo Eshun's Afrofuturist musicology to argue that most condemnations of "faking it" in music rest on a racially and sexually problematic fetishization of "the real.".
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