View topic on PhilPapers for more information
Related categories

7 found
Order:
More results on PhilPapers
  1. Autonomy of artistic practices in the Anthropocene: political and ecological perspectives.Karolina Rybačiauskaitė - 2019 - Athena 14:221-233.
    In this article, it is claimed that by considering Rancière’s understanding of politics of aesthetics alongside Stengers’ conception of the ecology of practices, it is possible to think about the autonomy of artistic practices which would be created and sustained politically. Rancière demonstrates that the artistic autonomy was previously subordinated to a variety of historical imperatives, while Stengers warns about an apolitical mission of the great narrative of the Anthropocene. Both philosophers make a case for talking about the autonomy of (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. The Great Leveler: Conceptual and Figural Ambiguities of Equality.Jean-Philippe Deranty - 2017 - Cogent Arts and Humanities 4 (1).
    If we compare it with the fellow notion of liberty, equality has an ambivalent place in modern political thinking. Whilst it counts as one of the fundamental norms, many think that equality is valuable only as a way to realise some features of liberty. I take a historical perspective on this issue, and try to identify some of the pre-modern roots of such an ambivalent attitude towards equality. I do this by using Jacques Rancière’s political model as an analytical framework (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. A Coffee with Jacques Rancière Beneath the Acropolis.Alexandros Schismenos, Yiannis Ktenas & Yavor Tarinski (eds.) - 2017 - 2017: Babylonia Journal.
    We met Jacques Rancière on Saturday, May 27, 2017, at the School of Fine Arts shortly before his speech at the B-Fest 6 International Anti-Authoritarian Festival, organized by Babylonia Journal, with a central slogan “We are ungovernable”. Rancière is among the most important European philosophers alive and his work does not need further introductions. In the cloudy morning of Sunday 28 May, we sat beneath the Acropolis to have a coffee with the philosopher. The transcript of our conversation reflects the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. The Politics of the Third Person: Esposito’s Third Person and Rancière’s Disagreement.Matheson Russell - 2014 - Critical Horizons 15 (3):211-230.
    Against the enthusiasm for dialogue and deliberation in recent democratic theory, the Italian philosopher Roberto Esposito and French philosopher Jacques Rancière construct their political philosophies around the nondialogical figure of the third person. The strikingly different deployments of the figure of the third person offered by Esposito and Rancière present a crystallization of their respective approaches to political philosophy. In this essay, the divergent analyses of the third person offered by these two thinkers are considered in terms of the critical (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Ranciere's Aesthetic Revolution and Its Modernist Residues.Jakub Stejskal - 2012 - Filozofski Vestnik 33 (3):39 - +.
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Rancière and Aristotle: Parapolitics, Part-y Politics and the Institution of Perpetual Politics.Adriel Trott - 2012 - Journal for Speculative Philosophy 26 (4):627-646.
    This article addresses Rancière’s critique of Aristotle’s political theory as parapolitics in order to show that Aristotle is a resource for developing an inclusionary notion of political community. Rancière argues that Aristotle attempts to cut off politics and merely police (maintain) the community by eliminating the political claim of the poor by including it. I respond to three critiques that Rancière makes of Aristotle: that he ends the political dispute by including the demos in the government; that he includes the (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Rancière’s Productive Contradictions.Gabriel Rockhill - 2011 - Symposium 15 (2):28-56.
    This article explores the force and limitations of Jacques Rancière’s novel attempt to rethink the relationship between aesthetics and politics. In particular, it unravels the paradoxical threads of the fundamental contradiction between two of his steadfast claims: (1) art and politics are consubstantial, and (2) art and politics never truly merge. In taking Rancière to task on this point, the primary objective of this article is to work through the nuances of his project andforeground the problems inherent therein in order (...)
    Remove from this list   Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark