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Rationality and Freedom

Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 67 (1):182-183 (2005)

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  1. Philosophical Egoism: Its Nature and Limitations: Hans Bernhard Schmid.Hans Bernhard Schmid - 2010 - Economics and Philosophy 26 (2):217-240.
    Egoism and altruism are unequal contenders in the explanation of human behaviour. While egoism tends to be viewed as natural and unproblematic, altruism has always been treated with suspicion, and it has often been argued that apparent cases of altruistic behaviour might really just be some special form of egoism. The reason for this is that egoism fits into our usual theoretical views of human behaviour in a way that altruism does not. This is true on the biological level, where (...)
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  • Hypothetical Markets: Educational Application of Ronald Dworkin's Sovereign Virtue.Stephen Gough - 2006 - Philosophy of Education 40 (3):287-299.
    The purpose of this paper is to consider, in principle and at the most general level, a particular possible approach to educational policy‐making. This approach involves an education‐specific application of the notion of hypothetical markets first developed in Ronald Dworkin's book Sovereign Virtue: The theory and practice of equality. The paper distinguishes the concept of the market from the operation of any actual market, and from the operation of ‘market forces’ in any generalised sense. It continues by arguing that hypothetical (...)
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  • Critical Capability Pedagogies and University Education.Melanie Walker - 2010 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 42 (8):898-917.
    The article argues for an alliance of the capability approach developed by Amartya Sen with ideas from critical pedagogy for undergraduate university education which develops student agency and well being on the one hand, and social change towards greater justice on the other. The purposes of a university education in this article are taken to include both intrinsic and instrumental purposes and to therefore include personal development, economic opportunities and becoming educated citizens. Core ideas from the capability approach are outlined, (...)
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  • Thematic Approach to Theoretical Speculations in the Field of Educational Administration.Jae Park - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (4):359-371.
    The purpose of this article is a critical reflection on the field of educational administration and its varied and often conflicting epistemologies. It is argued that the field of educational administration is a community of diverse epistemologies. Although epistemological heterogeneity has been persistently vilified by both theorists and pragmatists with their own discursive agendas, it is this precise environment of critical dialogue and diversity that is conducive to new frontiers in the field. A phenomenology of recognition is thus presented as (...)
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  • Political Efficacy, Respect for Agency, and Adaptive Preferences.Steven Weimer - 2017 - Journal of Global Ethics 13 (3):326-343.
    ABSTRACTSerene Khader and Rosa Terlazzo have each recently proposed theories of adaptive preferences which purport to both respect persons’ agency and provide an effective political tool. While Khader and Terlazzo thus share a similar goal, they take fundamentally different paths in its pursuit: Khader offers a perfectionist account of APs and Terlazzo an autonomy-based theory. In this paper, I argue first that if it is to adequately respect persons’ agency, a theory of APs should in some way include autonomy considerations. (...)
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  • Ethics, Profession, and Rational Choice.Ananda Das Gupta - 2016 - Asian Journal of Business Ethics 5 (1-2):53-60.
    Human development can be seen as the process of giving more effective expression to human values. Modern business philosophy has a certain viewpoint or perspective on human potential based on the secular humanistic values of the west and the scientific theories on the nature of man and his evolution. We are bound to welcome the New Paradigm in Business because it opens the path for a decisive step forward in evolution from an authoritarian, mechanistic, Taylorian era to a freer and (...)
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  • Hegel’s “Objective Spirit”, Extended Mind, and the Institutional Nature of Economic Action.Ivan A. Boldyrev & Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2013 - Mind and Society 12 (2):177-202.
    This paper explores the implications of the recent revival of Hegel studies for the philosophy of economics. We argue that Hegel’s theory of Objective Spirit anticipates many elements of modern approaches in cognitive sciences and of the philosophy of mind, which adopt an externalist framework. In particular, Hegel pre-empts the theories of social and distributed cognition. The pivotal elements of Hegelian social ontology are the continuity thesis, the performativity thesis, and the recognition thesis, which, when taken together, imply that all (...)
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  • The Freedom–Responsibility Nexus in Management Philosophy and Business Ethics.Claus Dierksmeier - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):263 - 283.
    This article pursues the question whether and inasmuch theories of corporate responsibility are dependent on conceptions of managerial freedom. I argue that neglect of the idea of freedom in economic theory has led to an inadequate conceptualization of the ethical responsibilities of corporations within management theory. In a critical review of the history of economic ideas, I investigate why and how the idea of freedom was gradually removed from the canon of economics. This reconstruction aims at a deconstruction of certain (...)
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  • Adaptive Preference, Justice and Identity in the Context of Widening Participation in Higher Education.David Bridges - 2006 - Ethics and Education 1 (1):15-28.
    Cultures of low aspirations, and more particularly young people's adaptation to them, are often presented as the major obstacle to an economic development agenda which requires more higher-level skills and a social agenda which is about enabling people from ‘non-traditional’ backgrounds to go to university. The article analyses and discusses some of the different sorts of constraints on the choices which we make and which may become unconsciously internalised and so constitute our adaptive preference. It argues, however, that all choice (...)
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  • Undue Inducements and Reasonable Risks: Will the Dismal Science Lead to Dismal Research Ethics?1.Alex John London - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):29-32.
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  • The Moral Economic Man.Laszlo Zsolnai - forthcoming - Ethics in the Economy: Handbook of Business Ethics, Forthcoming.
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  • Competencies Vs. Capabilities. A Philosophical Analysis of an Emerging Paradigm for Latin American Higher Education.Rodolfo Mauricio Bicocca Gino - 2016 - Ixtli 2 (4):281-298.
    Higher Education today have serious difficulties in meeting their educational task, about what could be done to assist and promote the student both personal enrichment and its human flourishing. Dimensions focus on two key educational concepts: the development of critical thinking and effective ethical and social commitment. These difficulties have multiple perspectives and analysis factors, but one of its main elements is marked mercantilist approach this level has now acquired. And consequently, their tendency almost exclusively to educating for employability. On (...)
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  • Liberal Naturalism and Non-Epistemic Values.Ricardo F. Crespo - 2019 - Foundations of Science 24 (2):247-273.
    The ‘value-free ideal’ has been called into question for several reasons. It does not include “epistemic values”—viewed as characteristic of ‘good science’—and rejects the so-called ‘contextual’, ‘non-cognitive’ or ‘non-epistemic’ values—all of them personal, moral, or political values. This paper analyzes a possible complementary argument about the dubitable validity of the value-free ideal, specifically focusing on social sciences, with a two-fold strategy. First, it will consider that values are natural facts in a broad or ‘liberal naturalist’ sense and, thus, a legitimate (...)
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  • Equal Opportunity, Equality, and Responsibility.Alex Voorhoeve - 2005 - Dissertation, University of London
    This thesis argues that a particular version of equal opportunity for welfare is the best way of meeting the joint demands of three liberal egalitarian ideals: distributional equality, responsibility, and respect for individuals’ differing reasonable judgements of their own good. It also examines which social choice rules best represent these demands. Finally, it defends the view that achieving equal opportunity for welfare should not only be a goal of formal public institutions, but that just citizens should also sometimes be guided (...)
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  • Libertad, justicia y racionalidad: los conceptos éticos básicos del enfoque de las capacidades.Jesús M. Conill-Sancho - 2015 - Filosofia Unisinos 16 (1).
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  • The Value of Beauty in Theory Pursuit: Kuhn, Duhem, and Decision Theory.Gregory J. Morgan - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (1):9-14.
    Should judgments of beauty play a guiding role in theoretical science even if beauty is not a sign of truth? In this paper I argue that they should in certain cases. If we analyze the rationality of theoretical pursuit using decision theory, a theory’s beauty can influence the utilities of the various options confronting the researcher. After considering the views of Pierre Duhem and Thomas Kuhn on aesthetics in science, I suggest that because we value freedom of inquiry we rightly (...)
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  • A Theory of Legislation From a Systems Perspective.Peter Harrison - unknown
    In this thesis I outline a view of primary legislation from a systems perspective. I suggest that systems theory and, in particular, autopoietic theory, as modified by field theory, is a mechanism for understanding how society operates. The description of primary legislation that I outline differs markedly from any conventional definition in that I argue that primary legislation is not, and indeed cannot be, either a law or any of the euphemisms that are usually accorded to an enactment by a (...)
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  • ‘Practical Comparability’ and Ends in Economics.Ricardo F. Crespo - 2007 - Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (3):371-393.
    This paper endeavours to summarize a variety of arguments for a reconsideration of ends in Economics. The logical structure of the rationality of ends (practical rationality) differs from the one of means (instrumental rationality). The paper sets out to explain the differences between both rationalities and some of the implications of incorporating this new emphasis on ends, given that Economics adopts the means rationality. The emergence of the topics of incommensurability and incomparability of ends is presented and a possible way (...)
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  • Sugden's Critique of the Capability Approach.Mozaffar Qizilbash - 2011 - Utilitas 23 (1):25-51.
    In comparing Sen's work with Mill's, Sugden criticizes Sen's capability approach because it may be applied in such a way that society or theorists judge what is best for people and potentially restrict liberty on that basis. Sugden cites Nussbaum's work as evidence in making his case. Sugden's critique of Sen's approach succeeds on a narrow reading of it. On that reading Sen is also critical of it because it does not leave enough room for liberty. On a broad reading, (...)
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  • Two Flaws in Anti-Market Criticisms.Tibor R. Machan - 2013 - Think 12 (35):95-99.
    Over the years, two criticisms of free markets have been repeated over and over again, by very prominent academics. One concerns the subjective theory of values many pro-market economists embrace, the other involves the move from something being good to do to requiring the government to make – or ‘nudge’ – us do it.
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  • Are Reasons Enough? Sen and Ricoeur on the Idea of Impartiality.Todd S. Mei - 2014 - Dialogue 53 (2):243-270.
    Amartya Sen argues that a conception of impartiality built upon “trans-positional objectivity” provides a potential remedy to conflicts of distributive justice by securing the most “reasonable reasons” in a debate. This article undertakes a critical analysis of Sen’s theory by contrasting it with Paul Ricoeur’s claim that impartiality is a normative concept and therefore that the demand faced within the arena of competing distributive claims is not one of providing the most reasonable reasons but of exposing and understanding the role (...)
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  • In Defense of the Social Safety Net.Craig Duncan - 2014 - Think 13 (38):25-37.
    This article responds to Tibor Machan's criticisms of government provision for needy citizens. It argues that although charity may be morally worthy, private charity is inadequate to the task of providing our fellow citizens with the security they deserve; the tremendous social good of secure access to a life of dignity can only be produced by a public social safety net. Moreover, individual rights to property do not stand in the way of providing a public social safety net. Since there (...)
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  • Stakeholder Capability Enhancement as a Path to Promote Human Dignity and Cooperative Advantage.Michelle K. Westermann-Behaylo, Harry J. Van Buren & Shawn L. Berman - 2016 - Business Ethics Quarterly 26 (4):529-555.
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  • Delineating The Reasonable And Rational For Humans.Michael David Baumtrog - 2014 - ISSA Proceedings 2014.
    The notions of “rational” and “reasonable” have much in common but are not synonymous. Conducting a review of the literature points to (at least) two distinct but related ideas as well as a middle “grey” area. This paper investigates and compares some characterizations of these notions and defends the view that focusing on reasonableness is best for those interested in human instances of reasoning and argumentation.
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  • Developing Capabilities: A Feminist Discourse Ethics Approach.Kleist Chad - unknown
    This dissertation attempts to preserve the central tenets of a global moral theory called “the capabilities approach” as defended by Martha Nussbaum, but to do so in a way that better realizes its own goals of identifying gender injustices and gaining cross-cultural support by providing an alternative defense of it. Capabilities assess an individual’s well-being based on what she is able to do and who she is able to be. Nussbaum grounds her theory in the intuitive idea that each and (...)
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  • Deontologia y racionalidad economica.Rafael Cejudo Córdoba - 2010 - Revista de Filosofía (Madrid) 35 (1):153-171.
    Economic Theory normally assumes the so-called homo economicus, a consequential model of rationality. We highlight the main features of this model in opposition to deontology: axiological homogeneity, maximization and agent neutrality. Amartya Sen’s criticism of standard consequentialism copes to those features, and includes commitment and duty in the economic rationality. We analyze his concept of preference to ascertain how far economic rationality can thus go in the direction of deontology. We conclude that, though diminished, the difference between them still remains.
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  • A Response to Dasgupta.Hilary Putnam & Vivian Walsh - 2007 - Economics and Philosophy 23 (3):359-364.
    The present note will be concerned only with Sir Partha Dasgupta's recent article in this journal (Dasgupta 2005). What is more, it will concentrate on those parts of the article which contain a serious misreading of Hilary Putnam's position on the entanglement of facts, theories and values. These philosophical matters can perhaps be clarified for economist readers (they should require no clarification for philosophers) by considering, to begin with, Dasgupta's interpretation of the Bergson–Samuelson position. What (Bergson) Burk (1938) and Samuelson (...)
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  • Dignity and the Value of Rejecting Profitable but Insulting Offers.E. Athanasiou, A. J. London & K. J. S. Zollman - 2015 - Mind 124 (494):409-448.
    In this paper we distinguish two competing conceptions of dignity, one recognizably Hobbesian and one recognizably Kantian. We provide a formal model of how decision-makers committed to these conceptions of dignity might reason when engaged in an economic transaction that is not inherently insulting, but in which it is possible for the dignity of the agent to be called into question. This is a modified version of the ultimatum game. We then use this model to illustrate ways in which the (...)
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  • Philosophy of Education and Economics: A Case for Closer Engagement.Stephen Gough - 2009 - Philosophy of Education 43 (2):269-283.
    Relatively little contemporary philosophy of education employs economic concepts directly. Even where issues such as marketisation of education are discussed there may be little clarification of underlying concepts. The paper argues that while much contemporary economic thinking on education may be philosophically naive, it is also the case that philosophy of education can productively engage with particular economic insights and perspectives. The paper examines particular conceptualisations of ‘economics’ and ‘the market’, drawing upon these to consider aspects of an issue that (...)
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  • Evolution’s Republic: Groundwork for a Biosocial Contract.Alex Schulman - 2014 - Social Science Information 53 (4):518-541.
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  • Multiple Objectives: A Neglected Problem in the Theory of Human Action.Stephen Ellis - 2006 - Synthese 153 (2):313-338.
    The options that people face are rarely ideal: they are good in some ways and poor in others. People have problems choosing among such options because they don’t know which ends to favor. Multiple objectives pose a problem not only for decision makers, but also for our account of decision making. People act to achieve their ends given their beliefs. In order to handle decisions with multiple objectives, however, this story must be supplemented by an account of which ends are (...)
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  • Pluralism, Preferences, and Deliberation: A Critique of Sen's Constructive Argument for Democracy.Carlo Argenton & Enzo Rossi - 2013 - Journal of Social Philosophy 44 (2):129-145.
    In this paper we argue that Sen's defence of liberal democracy suffers from a moralistic and pro-liberal bias that renders it unable to take pluralism as seriously as it professes to do. That is because Sen’s commitment to respecting pluralism is not matched by his account of how to individuate the sorts of preferences that ought to be included in democratic deliberation. Our argument generalises as a critique of the two most common responses to the fact of pluralism in contemporary (...)
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  • Reconciling Corporate Citizenship and Competitive Strategy: Insights From Economic Theory.Sylvia Maxfield - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (2):367-377.
    Neoclassical and Austrian/evolutionary economic paradigms have different implications for integrating corporate social responsibility (corporate citizenship) and competitive strategy. porter's "Five Forces" model implicitly rests on neoclassical theory of the firm and is not easily reconciled with corporate social responsibility. Resource-based models of competitive strategy do not explicitly embrace a particular economic paradigm, but to the extent their conceptualization rests on neoclassical assumptions such as imperfect factor markets and profits as rents, these models also imply a trade-off between competitive advantage and (...)
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  • Collective Intention, Social Identity, and Rational Choice.Jelle de Boer - 2008 - Journal of Economic Methodology 15 (2):169-184.
    In this paper I propose that what social psychologists refer to as social identity is a plausible empirical correlate on the part of the individual to what some philosophers and economists call collective intention. A discussion of an experiment yields the question what kind of mental state social identity might be and how it is related to the standard desire/belief conception. It is argued that social identity involves both a desire and a belief, and that one distinguishing feature of it (...)
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  • Assessing the Moral Coherence and Moral Robustness of Social Systems: Proof of Concept for a Graphical Models Approach.Frauke Hoss & Alex John London - 2016 - Science and Engineering Ethics 22 (6):1761-1779.
    This paper presents a proof of concept for a graphical models approach to assessing the moral coherence and moral robustness of systems of social interactions. “Moral coherence” refers to the degree to which the rights and duties of agents within a system are effectively respected when agents in the system comply with the rights and duties that are recognized as in force for the relevant context of interaction. “Moral robustness” refers to the degree to which a system of social interaction (...)
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  • Educating Responsible Managers. The Role of University Ethos.José-Félix Lozano - 2012 - Journal of Academic Ethics 10 (3):213-226.
    The current economic crisis is forcing us to reflect on where we have gone wrong in recent years. In the search for responsibilities some have looked to Business Schools and Administration Departments. It is surprising that this situation has come about despite the fact that Business Ethics and Social Corporate Responsibility have been taught in business schools for years. Without wanting to place all the blame on higher education institutions, but from a critical perspective and assuming responsibility, we believe it (...)
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  • Introduction: Capabilities and Identity.Flavio Comim & Miriam Teschl - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):293-298.
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  • Distinctions as Embodied Experiences.Carlos M. Parra & Masakazu Yano - 2004 - Semiotica 2004 (151).
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  • Behavioral Economics, Federalism, and the Triumph of Stakeholder Theory.Allen Kaufman & Ernie Englander - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 102 (3):421-438.
    Stakeholder theorists distinguish between normative stakeholders, those who gain moral standing by making contributions to the firm, and derivative stakeholders, those who can constrain the corporate association even though they make no contribution. The board of directors has the legal authority to distinguish among these stakeholder groups and to distribute rights and obligations among these stakeholder groups. To be sure, this stakeholder formulation appropriately seizes on the firm’s voluntary, associative character. Yet, the firm’s constituents contribute assets and incur risks to (...)
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  • Intersubjectivity and Evaluations of Justice.Gustavo Pereira - 2012 - Thesis Eleven 108 (1):66-83.
    The capability approach assigns a central role to the contexts within which social interactions take place, which make individual liberty achievable. However, an auxiliary concept is necessary to explain the contexts of collective action more accurately. In this paper I shall present Taylor’s concept of irreducibly social goods as a supplement to the capability approach. I shall also introduce the concept of hermeneutics as a strategy suitable for evaluating which capabilities are to be considered valid, as an alternative to aggregative (...)
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  • Educational Research as a Form of Democratic Rationality.John Elliott - 2006 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):169–185.
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  • Making Sen’s Capability Approach Operational: A Random Scale Framework.John K. Dagsvik - 2013 - Theory and Decision 74 (1):75-105.
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  • Exploring the Link Between Human Rights, the Capability Approach and Corporate Responsibility.César González-Cantón, Sonia Boulos & Pablo Sánchez-Garrido - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    The capability approach is gaining momentum as a theory of corporate responsibility and business ethics at a time when the UN Guiding Principles have become a most important framework. A novel approach is now emerging that seeks to understand and specify human rights obligations of businesses within the framework provided by the capability approach. This article partially examines the triad corporate responsibility–human rights–capability approach by exploring the relationship between human rights and capabilities. Thus, it offers conceptual and practical implications for (...)
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  • Identity, Commitment and Morality.Herlinde Pauer‐Studer - 2006 - Journal of Economic Methodology 13 (3):349-369.
    In his critique of a self?interest understanding of rationality Amartya Sen appeals to notions like commitment and identity. Sen uses?identity? in an abstract sense: it refers to the conditions of rational agency. Sen's emphasis on the notion of identity finds a parallel in recent Kantian accounts, e.g. the work of Christine M. Korsgaard and Elizabeth S. Anderson. In my paper I compare Sen's account of practical rationality and identity with the Kantian accounts of practical rationality which consider the concept of (...)
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  • Does Legal Semiotics Cannibalize Jurisprudence?José de Sousa E. Brito - 2009 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 22 (4):387-398.
    Does Duncan Kennedy successfully cannibalize jurisprudence? He attempts to do it by demonstrating the inexistence of rightness in legal argumentation. If there is no right legal argument, then there is no right answer in adjudication, adjudication is not a rational enterprise and legal doctrine cannot be said to be a science. It can be shown that skepticism is self-defeating. Duncan Kennedy can avoid self defeat only because he actually believes in a lot of legal arguments. His thesis that judges decide (...)
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  • From Jensen to Jensen: Mechanistic Management Education or Humanistic Management Learning?Claus Dierksmeier - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Michael Jensen made a name for himself in the 1970s–1990 s with his ‘agency theory’ and its application to questions of corporate governance and economic policy. The effects of his theory were acutely felt in the pedagogics of business studies, as Jensen lent his authority to combat all attempts to integrate social considerations and moral values into business education. Lately, however, Michael Jensen has come to defend quite a different approach, promoting an ‘integrity theory’ of management learning. Jensen now rather (...)
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  • Asymmetries in Benefiting, Harming and Creating.Ben Bradley - 2013 - The Journal of Ethics 17 (1-2):37-49.
    It is often said that while we have a strong reason not to create someone who will be badly off, we have no strong reason for creating someone who will be well off. In this paper I argue that this asymmetry is incompatible with a plausible principle of independence of irrelevant alternatives, and that a more general asymmetry between harming and benefiting is difficult to defend. I then argue that, contrary to what many have claimed, it is possible to harm (...)
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  • The Main Argument for Value Incommensurability (and Why It Fails).Stephen Ellis - 2008 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 46 (1):27-43.
    Arguments for value incommensurability ultimately depend on a certain diagnosis of human motivation. Incommensurablists hold that each person’s basic ends are not only irreducible but also incompatiblewith one another. It isn’t merely that some goals can’t, in fact, be jointly realized; values actually compete for influence. This account makes a mistake about the nature of human motivation. Each valueunderwrites a ceteris paribus evaluation. Such assessments are mutually compatible because the observation that there is something to be said for an outcome (...)
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  • Introduction: New Frontiers in Global Justice.Fonna Forman & Gerry Mackie - 2013 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 16 (2):151-161.
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  • Reason, Paternalism, and Disaster.T. M. Wilkinson - 2009 - Res Publica 15 (2):203-211.
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