Switch to: References

Citations of:

Revolution in Poetic Language

Columbia University Press (1984)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Reconstituting the Subject: Feminism, Modernism, and Postmodernism.Susan Hekman - 1991 - Hypatia 6 (2):44-63.
    Political agency is vital to the formulation of a feminist politics so feminists have attempted to create a subject that eschews the sexism of the Cartesian subject while at the same time retaining agency. This paper examines some of the principal feminist attempts to reconstitute the subject along these lines. It assesses the success of these attempts in light of the question of whether the subject is a necessary component of feminist theory and practice.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Subject to Empowerment: The Constitution of Power in an Educational Program for Health Professionals.Truls I. Juritzen, Eivind Engebretsen & Kristin Heggen - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (3):443-455.
    Empowerment and user participation represents an ideal of power with a strong position in the health sector. In this article we use text analysis to investigate notions of power in a program plan for health workers focusing on empowerment. Issues addressed include: How are relationships of power between users and helpers described in the program plan? Which notions of user participation are embedded in the plan? The analysis is based on Foucault’s idea that power which is made subject to attempts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Were Nietzsche’s Cardinal Ideas – Delusions?Eva M. Cybulska - 2008 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 8 (1):1-13.
    Nietzsche’s cardinal ideas - God is Dead, Übermensch and Eternal Return of the Same - are approached here from the perspective of psychiatric phenomenology rather than that of philosophy. A revised diagnosis of the philosopher’s mental illness as manic-depressive psychosis forms the premise for discussion. Nietzsche conceived the above thoughts in close proximity to his first manic psychotic episode, in the summer of 1881, while staying in Sils-Maria (Swiss Alps). It was the anniversary of his father’s death, and also of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Reading Kristeva Through the Lens of Edusemiotics: Implications for Education.Inna Semetsky - 2015 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 47 (10):1069-1081.
    There are two focal points to this article. One is to address Julia Kristeva’s theoretical corpus in the context of philosophy of education. Kristeva’s notion of subject in process problematises education with its habitual emphasis on ‘product’. Another is to consider her impact from the perspective of edusemiotics. Edusemiotics is a new direction in educational philosophy and theory, and Kristeva represents one contemporary French intellectual who implicitly inspired the creation, research and development of edusemiotics. The article will briefly address the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Unpredictable Future of Fantasy's Traversal.Chris Coffman - 2013 - Angelaki 18 (4):43-61.
    Angelaki, Volume 18, Issue 4, Page 43-61, December 2013.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Freud's Oedipus and Kristeva's Narcissus: Three Heterogeneities.Sara Beardsworth - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):54-77.
    : The paper shows that three heterogeneities in Freud and Kristeva (unconscious/conscious, semiotic/symbolic, and imaginary/symbolic) expose the historical emergence, significance, and demise of psychic structures that present obstacles to our progressive political thinking. The oedipal and narcissistic structures of subjectivity represent the persistence of two past, bad forms of authority: paternal law and maternal authority. Contemporary psychoanalysis reveals a humankind going through the loss of this past in a process that opens up a different future of sexual difference in Western (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Abjection and the Constitutive Nature of Difference: Class Mourning in Margaret's Museum and Legitimating Myths of Innocence in Casablanca.Tina Chanter - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (3):86 - 106.
    This essay examines the connections between ignorance and abjection. Chanter relates Julia Kristeva's notion of abjection to the mechanisms of division found in feminist theory, race theory, film theory, and cultural theory. The neglect of the co-constitutive relationships among such categories as gender, race, and class produces abjection. If those categories are treated as separate parts of a person's identity that merely interlock or intermesh, they are rendered invisible and unknowable even in the very discourses about them. Race thus becomes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Powers of the False: Reading, Writing, Thinking Beyond Truth and Fiction.Doro Wiese - 2014 - Northwestern University Press.
    Can literature make it possible to represent histories that are otherwise ineffable? Making use of the Deleuzian concept of “the powers of the false,” Doro Wiese offers readings of three novels that deal with the Shoah, with colonialism, and with racialized identities. She argues that Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything Is Illuminated, Richard Flanagan’s Gould’s Book of Fish, and Richard Powers’s The Time of Our Singing are novels in which a space for unvoiced, silent, or silenced difference is created. Seen through (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • L’Écriture Limite: Kristeva's Postmodern Feminist Ethics.Dawne Mccance - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):141 - 160.
    In this essay, I trace the development of Julia Kristeva's theory and practice of "the subject in process/on trial" from her semiotic works of the 1960s to her psychoanalytic writings of the 1970s and 1980s. I read Kristeva's exploration of this "subject in process/on trial" as contributing to a postmodern feminist ethics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Container Technologies.Zoë Sofia - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):181-201.
    : This paper goes beyond critiques of western philosophical notions of space as passive, feminine, and unintelligent by reconfiguring containment as an (inter-)active process. The author draws on work in the history of technology, on a cybernetic epistemology that emphasizes the interdependence of organism and environment, and on intersubjectivist psychoanalytic theories of the maternal provision. A more unexpected ally is found in Heidegger, whose writings on holding and supply are read in ways that contribute to the development of an urgently (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Conflicted Love.Kelly Oliver - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):1-18.
    : Our stereotypes of maternity and paternity as manifest in the history of philosophy and psychoanalysis interfere with the ability to imagine loving relationships. The associations of maternity with antisocial nature and paternity with disembodied cul-ture are inadequate to set up primary love relationships. Analyzing the conflicts in these associations, I reformulate the maternal body as social and lawful, and I re-formulate the paternal function as embodied, which enables imagining our primary relationships as loving.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Homelessness or Symbolic Castration? Subjectivity, Language Acquisition, and Sociality in Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan.Bettina Schmitz & Translated By Julia Jansen - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (2):69-87.
    How much violence can a society expect its members to accept? A comparison between the language theories of Julia Kristeva and Jacques Lacan is the starting point for answering this question. A look at the early stages of language acquisition exposes the sacrificial logic of patriarchal society. Are those forces that restrict the individual to be conceived in a martial imagery of castration or is it possible that an existing society critically questions those points of socialization that leave their members (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The White Creole in Jean Rhys’s Wide Sargasso Sea : A Woman in Passage.Imen Mzoughi - 2016 - Human and Social Studies 5 (1):88-110.
    Studies on Jean Rhys have been fragmentary concentrating on one or two aspects of Rhys’s thematic concern with the alienation of the white creole without laying emphasis on Rhys’s exploration of the Creole’s identity. There has been no attempt to examine if the creole has to struggle harder and more than whites and blacks to come to terms with her personal identity until now. The answer is affirmative because the creole is a composite human being. Indeed, the white creole is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Holes of Oblivion: The Banality of Radical Evil.Peg Birmingham - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):80-103.
    : This essay offers a reflection on Arendt's notion of radical evil, arguing that her later understanding of the banality of evil is already at work in her earlier reflections on the nature of radical evil as banal, and furthermore, that Arendt's understanding of the "banality of radical evil" has its source in the very event that offers a possible remedy to it, namely, the event of natality. Kristeva's recent work (2001) on Arendt is important to this proposal insofar as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Nietzsche: Bipolar Disorder and Creativity.Eva M. Cybulska - 2019 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 19 (1):53-65.
    This essay, the last in a series, focuses on the relationship between Nietzsche’s mental illness and his philosophical art. It is predicated upon my original diagnosis of his mental condition as bipolar affective disorder, which began in early adulthood and continued throughout his creative life. The kaleidoscopic mood shifts allowed him to see things from different perspectives and may have imbued his writings with passion rarely encountered in philosophical texts. At times hovering on the verge of psychosis, Nietzsche was able (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Phenomenological Study of Sudanese Children's Experience of Seeking Refuge in North Africa.George Berguno & Nour Loutfy - 2009 - Schutzian Research. A Yearbook of Worldly Phenomenology and Qualitative Social Science 1:29-50.
    Forty-five children between the ages of nine and twelve years, who were forced to flee their native Sudan and seek refuge in Egypt, were interviewed about their everyday life in Cairo. Phenomenological analyses of the transcripts revealed the physical, social and technological dimensions to their encounter with a new cultural world. The interviews also revealed the extent to which the children had to face racism, discrimination and social exclusion. Specific analyses of children’s difficulties in learning a new form of Arabic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “The Lost Foundation”: Kristeva's Semiotic Chora and Its Ambiguous Legacy.Maria Margaroni - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):78-98.
    The aim of this essay is to reclaim Kristeva's concept of the semiotic chora by reinscribing it as an intervention in the context of two important postmodern debates. The first debate relates to the philosophical problem of "the beginning before the Beginning." The second concerns the necessity and possibility of mediation between incommensurable entities: the "demonic" and the social, desire and the Law, material production and representation. I contend: (1) that the introduction of the chora in RPL is part of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Receptacle/ Chōra: Figuring the Errant Feminine in Plato's Timaeus.Emanuela Bianchi - 2001 - Hypatia 21 (4):124-146.
    This essay undertakes a reexamination of the notion of the receptacle/chōra in Plato's Timaeus, asking what its value may be to feminists seeking to understand the topology of the feminine in Western philosophy. As the source of cosmic motion as well as a restless figurality, labile and polyvocal, the receptacle/chōra offers a fecund zone of destabilization that allows for an immanent critique of ancient metaphysics. Engaging with Derridean, Irigarayan, and Kristevan analyses, Bianchi explores whether receptacle/chōra can exceed its reduction to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Being-From-Others: Reading Heidegger After Cavarero.Lisa Guenther - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):99-118.
    : Drawing on Adriana Cavarero's account of natality, Guenther argues that Martin Heidegger overlooks the distinct ontological and ethical significance of birth as a limit that orients one toward an other who resists appropriation, even while handing down a heritage of possibilities that one can—and must—make one's own. Guenther calls this structure of natality Being-from-others, modifying Heidegger's language of inheritance to suggest an ethical understanding of existence as the gift of the other.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • A Short Study on Spinoza's View of Religion.İbrahim Okan Akkın - 2018 - In Roman Dorczak, Christian Ruggiero, Regina-Lenart Gansiniec & M. Ali Icbay (eds.), Research and Development on Social Sciences. Kraków, Poland: Jagiellonian University. pp. 225-232.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Role of the Church in the Politics of Social Transformation: The Paradox of Nihilism.Virgilio Aquino Rivas - 2008 - The Politics and Religion Journal 2 (2):55-77.
    The paper attempts to demonstrate; drawing on the recent experience of Philippine Catholic faith; that the relevance of the Church in the postmodern age is as much a political choice as it is a tolerance of the nihilistic mood of the times. It is a political choice insofar as the Church has nowhere to go in the postmodern except through asserting its relevance; which necessarily means homing in on the growing irrelevance of the organized faith; amidst the secular and liberal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Role of Waste in Modern Political Philosophy.Sarah Magdelene Gorman - 2019 - Dissertation, Vanderbilt University
    In my dissertation, I engage in a political history of waste; in particular I look at modern philosophers from the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries and the way that waste functions alongside narratives of civilization, progress, and perfection. I analyze the political, pedagogical, and other theories of John Locke, Jean Jacques Rousseau, and Immanuel Kant. I use Julia Kristevaâs concept of abjection to trace the legacies of these philosophers to the continued and continuing practices of wasting life their work (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Visual and Verbal Color: Chaos or Cognitive and Cultural Fugue? ‎.Mony Almalech - 2019 - In Evangelos Kourdis, Maria Papadopoulou & Loukia Kostopoulou (eds.), The Fugue of the Five Senses and the Semiotics of the Shifting Sensorium: Selected ‎Proceedings from the 11th International Conference of the Hellenic Semiotics Society.
    Fugue and chaos are used in their contemporary meaning. Elements of the fugue, albeit a ‎small number of universals, will be demonstrated in the area of visual and verbal colors. ‎Chaos dominates the internet, fashion, and everyday life. The visual and verbal colors are ‎differentiated and their communicative potential is indicated alongside the diachronic changes. The prototypes of colors are the interface between visual and verbal colors.‎.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moving Ourselves, Moving Others: Motion and Emotion in Intersubjectivity, Consciousness, and Language.Andrea Schiavio - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):735-739.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Man Becomes Adam‎.Mony Almalech - 2018 - In Audroné Daubariené, Simona Stano & Ulrika Varankaité (eds.), Cross-Inter-Multi-Trans Proceedings of the 13th World Congress of the International Association for Semiotic Studies (IASS/AIS).
    The paper is focused on Genesis 1 – 3 where the primordial man [adàm] is created ‎and he was given the proper name Adam [adàm]. ‎ In Hebrew man and Adam are the same word, spelled the same way – [adàm]. ‎Different translations of Genesis 1-3 use for the first time the proper name Adam in ‎different places versions Gen 2:25; The German Luther ‎Bible Gen 3:8; Some English Protestant versions Gen 3:17; Bulgarian Protestant and many ‎English Protestant versions Gen (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Word and Image: Framing Philology.Axel Fliethmann - 2007 - Thesis Eleven 89 (1):43-57.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Reading the Genotext in Harryette Mullen’s Muse & Drudge: “Sapphire’s Lyre Styles…”.William Scott - 2018 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 26 (2):32-42.
    In her early work on Modernist poetry and avant-garde poetics, Julia Kristeva proposed a bifurcated view of the poetic text as simultaneously constituted by both a “genotext” and a “phenotext.” Reading the “genotext” of any given poem might start by “pointing out the transfers of drive energy that can be detected in phonematic devices and melodic devices ”; and, in her words, it would also need to take into consideration “the way semantic and categorial fields are set out in syntactic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sexual Topologies in the Aristotelian Cosmos: Revisiting Irigaray’s Physics of Sexual Difference.Emanuela Bianchi - 2010 - Continental Philosophy Review 43 (3):373-389.
    Irigaray’s engagement with Aristotelian physics provides a specific diagnosis of women’s ontological and ethical situation under Western metaphysics: Women provide place and containership to men, but have no place of their own, rendering them uncontained and abyssal. She calls for a reconfiguration of this topological imaginary as a precondition for an ethics of sexual difference. This paper returns to Aristotelian cosmological texts to further investigate the topologies of sexual difference suggested there. In an analysis both psychoanalytic and phenomenological, the paper (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • "Patient Interpretation: Kristeva's Model for the Caregiver".Melinda C. Hall - 2017 - In Sarah Hansen & Rebecca Tuvel (eds.), New Forms of Revolt: Essays on Kristeva's Intimate Politics. Albany, New York: SUNY Press. pp. 107-125.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Silence.Taylor Andrew - unknown
    Silence may traditionally have been golden, but how is it valued today? Can it survive the impact of a technology which can, and does, bring the apparently irresistible seductions of noise to the remotest parts of the world, and which invades the most reclusive aspects of our lives? And what place has silence in a culture such as ours which classifies it as "unproductive"? But what is silence anyway? Professor Taylor considers two ways in which, from the Romantic period onward, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Against Matricide: Rethinking Subjectivity and the Maternal Body.Alison Stone - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (1):118-138.
    In this article I critically re-examine Julia Kristeva's view that becoming a speaking subject requires psychical matricide: violent separation from the maternal body. I propose an alternative, non-matricidal conception of subjectivity, in part by drawing out anti-matricidal strands in Kristeva's own thought, including her view that early mother–child relations are triangular. Whereas she understands this triangle in terms of a first imaginary father, I re-interpret this triangle using Donald Winnicott's idea of potential space and Jessica Benjamin's idea of an intersubjective (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • (Un)Concealing the Hedgehog. Modernist and Postmodernist American Poetry and Contemporary Critical Theories.Paulina Ambroży - unknown
    The book is an attempt to explore the affinities between contemporary critical theories and modernist and postmodernist American poetry. The analysis focuses on poststructuralist theories, notorious for their tendency to destabilize generic boundaries between literary, philosophical and critical discourses. The main argument and the structure of the book derive from Jacques Derrida’s essay “Che cos’è la poesia” [What is poetry?] in which the philosopher postulates the impossibility of defining poetry by comparing a poem to a hedgehog – prickly, solitary, untamed, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Symptom Without Transcendental Syntax.Rahman Veisi Hasar - 2015 - Sign Systems Studies 43 (1):29-47.
    This paper aims at investigating the Freudian symptom as an individual anti-language involved in a semiotic antagonism towards the internal logonomic system. In Freudian-Lacanian psychoanalysis, the symptom is interpreted according to transcendental and atemporal principles. Leaving aside these principles, we argue for a social semiotic approach in which the meaning of symptom is determined by its antagonistic relationship to the logonomic system, and also by its converted link with the repressed object in a specific socio-cultural context. The symptomatic antagonism is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Two Feminisms.Noëlle McAfee - 2005 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (2):140-149.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Epistemic Injustice Expanded: A Feminist, Animal Studies Approach.Rebecca Dayna Tuvel - unknown
    In this dissertation, I argue that an account of epistemic injustice sensitive to interlocking oppressions must take us beyond injustice to human knowers. Although several feminist epistemologists argue for the incorporation of all forms of oppression into their analyses, feminist epistemology remains for the most part an anthropocentric enterprise. Yet insofar as a reduction to animal irrationality has been central to the epistemic injustice of both humans and animals, I propose that in addition to axes of gender, race, class and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Real Fit: Identity, Society, and Viewer Investment in Fitness Reality TV.Juliana Wolf Lewis - unknown
    Real Fit: Identity, Society, and Viewer Investment in Reality TV is first and foremost a philosophical experiment in how to articulate the space between viewer and screen. Its driven by a methodological investment in bringing theories of normativity into an experiential terrain typically dominated by media studies. What does it mean to study an audience? And how does this knowledge speak to, or challenge our existing models? Its an investigation into the political dimension of seemingly innocuous entertainment, and a deep (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Poietical Subjects in Heidegger, Kristeva, and Aristotle.Melissa Shew - 2010 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 2 (1):63-80.
    Prompted by Eryximachus’ speech about the relationship between Eros and health in Plato’s Symposium, this paper engages the nature of poiēsis as it arises in the works of Martin Heidegger, Julia Kristeva, and Aristotle. All three address poiēsis as a human activity that points beyond an individual person, and in so doing speaks to what’s possible for human life. Section I addresses Heidegger, whose insistance on the interplay between “earth” and “world” in “The Origin of a Work of Art” speaks (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Julie Taymor, Sony’s Digital Dream Kids, and the Marxist Labor Theory of Value.David U. Garfinkle - 2015 - The European Legacy 20 (8):827-843.
    Julie Taymor is an exemplary artist who has successfully made the transition from avant-garde director of live theatre in the 1980s to become a Broadway director for Disney Corporation with The Lion King, and, more recently, a film director with Sony’s nostalgic look at the music of the Beatles in Across the Universe. Highlights of her career—spanning the latter half of the twentieth century—offer excellent examples of the changes in the economics of creativity and artistic labor for a case study (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • L’Écriture Limite: Kristeva's Postmodern Feminist Ethics.Dawne Mccance - 1996 - Hypatia 11 (2):141-160.
    In this essay, I trace the development of Julia Kristeva's theory and practice of “the subject in procession trial” from her semiotic works of the 1960s to her psychoanalytic writings of the 1970s and 1980s. I read Kristeva's exploration of this “subject in procession trial” as contributing to a postmodern feminist ethics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Holes of Oblivion: The Banality of Radical Evil.Peg Birmingham - 2003 - Hypatia 18 (1):80-103.
    This essay offers a reflection on Arendt's notion of radical evil, arguing that her later understanding of the banality of evil is already at work in her earlier reflections on the nature of radical evil as banal, and furthermore, that Arendt's understanding of the “banality of radical evil” has its source in the very event that offers a possible remedy to it, namely, the event of natality. Kristeva's recent work on Arendt is important to this proposal insofar as her notion (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva.Judith Butler - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):104-118.
    Julia Kristeva attempts to expose the limits of Lacan's theory of language by revealing the semiotic dimension of language that it excludes. She argues that the semiotic potential of language is subversive, and describes the semiotic as a poetic-maternal linguistic practice that disrupts the symbolic, understood as culturally intelligible rule-governed speech. In the course of arguing that the semiotic contests the universality of the Symbolic, Kristeva makes several theoretical moves which end up consolidating the power of the Symbolic and paternal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Container Technologies.Zoë Sofia - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (2):181-201.
    This paper goes beyond critiques of western philosophical notions of space as passive, feminine, and unintelligent by reconfiguring containment as an active process. The author draws on work in the history of technology, on a cybernetic epistemology that emphasizes the interdependence of organism and environment, and on intersubjectivist psychoanalytic theories of the maternal provision. A more unexpected ally is found in Heidegger, whose writings on holding and supply are read in ways that contribute to the development of an urgently required (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • A Woman's Thought or a Man's Discipline? The Letters of Abelard and Heloise.Andrea Nye - 1992 - Hypatia 7 (3):1 - 22.
    This paper is part of a larger project of recovering the work of women thinkers. Heloise has traditionally been read as either a foil of Abelard or his intellectual appendage. In this paper, I present her views on love, religious devotion, and language as an alternative to philosophic method as it is conceived by Abelard.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Freud's Oedipus and Kristeva's Narcissus: Three Heterogeneities.Sara Beardsworth - 2005 - Hypatia 20 (1):54-77.
    The paper shows that three heterogeneities in Freud and Kristeva expose the historical emergence, significance, and demise of psychic structures that present obstacles to our progressive political thinking. The oedipal and narcissistic structures of subjectivity represent the persistence of two past, bad forms of authority: paternal law and maternal authority. Contemporary psychoanalysis reveals a humankind going through the loss of this past in a process that opens up a different future of sexual difference in Western cultures.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conflicted Love.Kelly Oliver - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):1-18.
    Our stereotypes of maternity and paternity as manifest in the history of philosophy and psychoanalysis interfere with the ability to imagine loving relationships. The associations of maternity with antisocial nature and paternity with disembodied culture are inadequate to set up primary love relationships. Analyzing the conflicts in these associations, I reformulate the maternal body as social and lawful, and I reformulate the paternal function as embodied, which enables imagining our primary relationships as loving.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Speaking Abject in Kristeva's "Powers of Horror".Thea Harrington - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (1):138-157.
    This essay analyzes the implications of the performative aspects of Julia Kristeva 's Powers of Horror by situating this work in the context of similar aspects of her previous work. This construction and its relationship to abjection are integral components of Kristeva 's notion of practice and as such are fundamental to her critique of Hegel and Freud.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Speaking Abject in Kristeva's Powers of Horror.Thea Harrington - 1998 - Hypatia 13 (1):138-157.
    This essay analyzes the implications of the performative aspects of Julia Kristeva's Powers of Horror by situating this work in the context of similar aspects of her previous work. This construction and its relationship to abjection are integral components of Kristeva's notion of practice and as such are fundamental to her critique of Hegel and Freud.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Body Politics of Julia Kristeva.Judith Butler - 1988 - Hypatia 3 (3):104-118.
    Julia Kristeva attempts to expose the limits of Lacan's theory of language by revealing the semiotic dimension of language that it excludes. She argues that the semiotic potential of language is subversive, and describes the semiotic as a poeticmaternal linguistic practice that disrupts the symbolic, understood as culturally intelligible rule-governed speech. In the course of arguing that the semiotic contests the universality of the Symbolic, Kristeva makes several theoretical moves which end up consolidating the power of the Symbolic and paternal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW][author unknown] - 2006 - The European Legacy 11 (4):439-479.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark