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Sovereignty and Its Other: Toward the Dejustification of Violence

New York: Fordham University Press (2013)

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  1. Solon’s Ekstatic Strategy: Stasis and the Subject/ Citizen.Dimitris Vardoulakis - 2017 - Cultural Critique 96:71-100.
    The articles considers how the "death of the subject" influences ways in which we understand the aestheticization of the political." It explores how Walter Benjamin's "The Work of Art in the Age of Technological Reproducibility" can contribute to a conception of the political implications of thinking the subject. It also turns to Solon's conception of subjectivity as a way of mediating the current discussion on the subject.
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  • The Politics of Nothing: On Sovereignty.Clare Monagle & Dimitris Vardoulakis (eds.) - 2012 - Routledge.
    This book questions what sovereignty looks like when it is de-ontologised; when the nothingness at the heart of claims to sovereignty is unmasked and laid bare. Drawing on critical thinkers in political theology, such as Schmitt, Agamben, Nancy, Blanchot, Paulhan, The Politics of Nothing asks what happens to the political when considered in the frame of the productive potential of the nothing? The answers are framed in terms of the deep intellectual histories at our disposal for considering these fundamental questions, (...)
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  • Homo profanus: The Christian martyr and the violence of meaning-making.Matthew Recla - 2014 - Critical Research on Religion 2 (2):147-164.
    The martyr is a potent symbol of sacrifice in Western cultural discourse. Understanding martyrdom as sacrifice, however, blunts the potency of the martyr's action. It obscures the violence by which the martyr's death becomes, paradoxically, a means to define institutional life. In this article, I propose an analogous relationship between the early Christian martyr and Giorgio Agamben's enigmatic homo sacer. Like homo sacer, the Christian martyr provides an “other” against which to organize institutional life. Read as a sacrifice, the martyr (...)
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  • “The Islamic State is not Islamic:” Terrorism, Sovereignty and Declarations of Unbelief.Caleb D. McCarthy - 2016 - Critical Research on Religion 4 (2):156-170.
    This article examines the Islamic concept of takfīr as it is used in secular-pluralistic contexts, within a larger delegitimizing discourse against terrorism. I argue that this takfīr as deployed by “liberal” Muslims, functions to legitimate the state’s use of coercive force. Furthermore, the secular state may in turn draw upon these discourses to co-opt the right to determine authentic Muslim identity. However, in doing so the state is forced to enter into a religiously discursive space. Takfīr notably becomes the site (...)
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