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Newtonian space-time

Texas Quarterly 10:174--200 (1967)

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  1. Space-Time Relationism in Newtonian and Relativistic Physics.Dennis Dieks - 2000 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 15 (1):5 – 17.
    I argue that there is natural relationist interpretation of Newtonian and relativistic non-quantum physics. Although relationist, this interpretation does not fall prey to the traditional objections based on the existence of inertial effects.
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  • Why Manifold Substantivalism is Probably Not a Consequence of Classical Mechanics.Nick Huggett - 1999 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 13 (1):17 – 34.
    This paper develops and defends three related forms of relationism about spacetime against attacks by contemporary substantivalists. It clarifies Newton's globes argument to show that it does not bear on relations that fail to determine geodesic motions, since the inertial effects on which Newton relies are not simply correlated with affine structure, but must be understood in dynamical terms. It develops remarks by Sklar and van Fraassen into relational versions of Newtonian mechanics, and argues that Earman does not show them (...)
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  • Spacetime Theory as Physical Geometry.Robert DiSalle - 1995 - Erkenntnis 42 (3):317-337.
    Discussions of the metaphysical status of spacetime assume that a spacetime theory offers a causal explanation of phenomena of relative motion, and that the fundamental philosophical question is whether the inference to that explanation is warranted. I argue that those assumptions are mistaken, because they ignore the essential character of spacetime theory as a kind of physical geometry. As such, a spacetime theory does notcausally explain phenomena of motion, but uses them to construct physicaldefinitions of basic geometrical structures by coordinating (...)
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  • Newtonian Emanation, Spinozism, Measurement and the Baconian Origins of the Laws of Nature.Eric Schliesser - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):449-466.
    The first two sections of this paper investigate what Newton could have meant in a now famous passage from “De Graviatione” (hereafter “DeGrav”) that “space is as it were an emanative effect of God.” First it offers a careful examination of the four key passages within DeGrav that bear on this. The paper shows that the internal logic of Newton’s argument permits several interpretations. In doing so, the paper calls attention to a Spinozistic strain in Newton’s thought. Second it sketches (...)
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  • Can Parts of Space Move? On Paragraph Six of Newton’s Scholium.Graham Nerlich - 2005 - Erkenntnis 62 (1):119--135.
    Paragraph 6 of Newtons Scholium argues that the parts of space cannot move. A premise of the argument – that parts have individuality only through an order of position – has drawn distinguished modern support yet little agreement among interpretations of the paragraph. I argue that the paragraph offers an a priori, metaphysical argument for absolute motion, an argument which is invalid. That order of position is powerless to distinguish one part of Euclidean space from any other has gone virtually (...)
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  • Can Parts of Space Move? On Paragraph Six of Newton’s Scholium.Graham Nerlich - 2005 - Erkenntnis 62 (1):119-135.
    Paragraph 6 of Newton's Scholium argues that the parts of space cannot move. A premise of the argument -- that parts have individuality only through an "order of position" -- has drawn distinguished modern support yet little agreement among interpretations of the paragraph. I argue that the paragraph offers an a priori, metaphysical argument for absolute motion, an argument which is invalid. That "order of position" is powerless to distinguish one part of Euclidean space from any other has gone virtually (...)
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  • The Philosophy of Hans Reichenbach.Wesley C. Salmon - 1977 - Synthese 34 (1):5 - 88.
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  • Metagesetze Und Theorieunabhängige Bedeutung Physikalischer Begriffe.Andreas Kamlah - 1978 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 9 (1):41-62.
    The determination of the meaning of theoretical terms by the axioms of theories as meaning postulates and the merely fictitious character of a basic observational language leads to Feyerabends problem of the incommensurability of physical theories. Different theories are actually compared by physicists as well. They might have a common sub-language as the language of macroscopic physics in atomic physics. Furthermore shared metalaws define an equivalence relation which identifies terms of different theories and enables physicists to talk about them in (...)
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  • Kant's Formulation of the Laws of Motion.Robert Palter - 1972 - Synthese 24 (1-2):96 - 116.
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  • Review of Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics. [REVIEW]Chris Smeenk - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (1):194-199.
    Book Review for Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics, La Salle, IL: Open Court, 2002. Edited by David Malament. This volume includes thirteen original essays by Howard Stein, spanning a range of topics that Stein has written about with characteristic passion and insight. This review focuses on the essays devoted to history and philosophy of physics.
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  • Philosophical Geometers and Geometrical Philosophers.Chris Smeenk - 2016 - In B. Hill, G. Gorham, E. Slowik & C. Kenneth Waters (eds.), The Language of Nature: Reassessing the Mathematization of Natural Philosophy in the Seventeenth Century. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press. pp. 308-338.
    Galileo’s dictum that the book of nature “is written in the language of mathematics” is emblematic of the accepted view that the scientific revolution hinged on the conceptual and methodological integration of mathematics and natural philosophy. Although the mathematization of nature is a distinctive and crucial feature of the emergence of modern science in the seventeenth century, this volume shows that it was a far more complex, contested, and context-dependent phenomenon than the received historiography has indicated, and that philosophical controversies (...)
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  • Absolute Space and Conventionalism.David Zaret - 1979 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 30 (3):211-226.
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  • Newton's Scholium on Time, Space, Place and Motion.Robert Rynasiewicz - unknown
    In the Scholium to the Definitions at the beginning of the {\em Principia\/} Newton distinguishes absolute time, space, place and motion from their relative counterparts and attempts to justify they are indeed ontologically distinct in that the absolute quantity cannot be reduced to some particular category of the relative, as Descartes had attempted by defining absolute motion to be relative motion with respect to immediately ambient bodies. Newton's bucket experiment, rather than attempting to show that absolute motion exists, is one (...)
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  • “P-C Thinking”: The Ironical Attachment of Logical Empiricism to General Relativity.T. A. Ryckman - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (3):471-497.
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  • Saving Newton's Text: Documents, Readers, and the Ways of the World.Robert Palter - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 18 (4):385.
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  • Newton’s Path to Universal Gravitation: The Role of the Pendulum.Pierre J. Boulos - 2006 - Science & Education 15 (6):577-595.
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  • Essay Review: Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation TheoryDavid Malament, Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory. Chicago: University of Chicago Press , Xii+349 Pp., $55.00. [REVIEW]John Byron Manchak - 2012 - Philosophy of Science 79 (4):575-583.
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  • Does Newtonian Space Provide Identity to Quantum Systems?Décio Krause - 2019 - Foundations of Science 24 (2):197-215.
    Physics is not just mathematics. This seems trivial, but poses difficult and interesting questions. In this paper we analyse a particular discrepancy between non-relativistic quantum mechanics and ‘classical’ space and time. We also suggest, but not discuss, the case of the relativistic QM. In this work, we are more concerned with the notion of space and its mathematical representation. The mathematics entails that any two spatially separated objects are necessarily different, which implies that they are discernible —we say that the (...)
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  • Space and Time in Particle and Field Physics.Dennis Dieks - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (2):217-241.
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  • Space and Time in Particle and Field Physics.Dennis Dieks - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 32 (2):217-241.
    Textbooks present classical particle and field physics as theories of physical systems situated in Newtonian absolute space. This absolute space has an influence on the evolution of physical processes, and can therefore be seen as a physical system itself; it is substantival. It turns out to be possible, however, to interpret the classical theories in another way. According to this rival interpretation, spatiotemporal position is a property of physical systems, and there is no substantival spacetime. The traditional objection that such (...)
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  • If Metrical Structure Were Not Dynamical, Counterfactuals in General Relativity Would Be Easy.Erik Curiel - unknown
    General relativity poses serious problems for counterfactual propositions peculiar to it as a physical theory. Because these problems arise solely from the dynamical nature of spacetime geometry, they are shared by all schools of thought on how counterfactuals should be interpreted and understood. Given the role of counterfactuals in the characterization of, inter alia, many accounts of scientific laws, theory confirmation and causation, general relativity once again presents us with idiosyncratic puzzles any attempt to analyze and understand the nature of (...)
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  • Space, Atoms and Mathematical Divisibility in Newton.Andrew Janiak - 2000 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 31 (2):203-230.
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  • Berkeley, Newton and the Stars.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1986 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 17 (1):23-42.
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  • More Problems for Newtonian Cosmology.David Wallace - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 57:35-40.
    I point out a radical indeterminism in potential-based formulations of Newtonian gravity once we drop the condition that the potential vanishes at infinity. This indeterminism, which is well known in theoretical cosmology but has received little attention in foundational discussions, can be removed only by specifying boundary conditions at all instants of time, which undermines the theory's claim to be fully cosmological, i.e., to apply to the Universe as a whole. A recent alternative formulation of Newtonian gravity due to Saunders (...)
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  • Newton’s Empiricism and Metaphysics.Mary Domski - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (7):525-534.
    Commentators attempting to understand the empirical method that Isaac Newton applies in his Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy (1687) are forced to grapple with the thorny issue of how to reconcile Newton's rejection of hypotheses with his appeal to absolute space. On the one hand, Newton claims that his experimental philosophy does not rely on claims that are assumed without empirical evidence, and on the other hand, Newton appeals to an absolute space that, by his own characterization, does not make (...)
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  • Who's Afraid of Absolute Space?John Earman - 1970 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 48 (3):287-319.
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  • Understanding Space-Time.Michael Friedman - 2007 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 38 (1):216-225.
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  • The Transcendental Method From Newton to Kant.Robert DiSalle - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):448-456.
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  • Space and Motion in Nature and Scripture: Galileo, Descartes, Newton.Andrew Janiak - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:89-99.
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  • Newton and Kant: Quantity of Matter in the Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science.Michael Friedman - 2012 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 50 (3):482-503.
    Immanuel Kant's Metaphysical Foundations of Natural Science (1786) provides metaphysical foundations for the application of mathematics to empirically given nature. The application that Kant primarily has in mind is that achieved in Isaac Newton's Principia (1687). Thus, Kant's first chapter, the Phoronomy, concerns the mathematization of speed or velocity, and his fourth chapter, the Phenomenology, concerns the empirical application of the Newtonian notions of true or absolute space, time, and motion. This paper concentrates on Kant's second and third chapters—the Dynamics (...)
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  • In Search of (Spacetime) Structuralism.Hilary Greaves - 2011 - Philosophical Perspectives 25 (1):189-204.
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  • Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics. [REVIEW]Chris Smeenk - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 36 (1):194-199.
    This volume is a fitting tribute to Howard Stein. It includes 13 original essays of remarkably high quality overall, most of which were presented at Steinfest, a celebration of Stein's 70th birthday held at the University of Chicago in 1999. The essays span a range of topics that Stein has written about with characteristic passion and insight, and they illustrate the influence of Stein's body of work, both in terms of their subject matter and their methodology.
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  • Einstein, Newton and the Empirical Foundations of Space Time Geometry.Robert DiSalle - 1992 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 6 (3):181 – 189.
    Abstract Einstein intended the general theory of relativity to be a generalization of the relativity of motion and, therefore, a radical departure from previous spacetime theories. It has since become clear, however, that this intention was not fulfilled. I try to explain Einstein's misunderstanding on this point as a misunderstanding of the role that spacetime plays in physics. According to Einstein, earlier spacetime theories introduced spacetime as the unobservable cause of observable relative motions and, in particular, as the cause of (...)
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  • Kant and Hume on Causality.Graciela De Pierris & Michael Friedman - 2008 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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