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Seeing Aspects in Wittgenstein

In William Day & Víctor J. Krebs (eds.), Seeing Wittgenstein Anew. Cambridge University Press (2010)

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  1. Persuasion as Tool of Education: The Wittgensteinian Case.Alessio Persichetti - forthcoming - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    In this paper, I aim to explore what role persuasion plays in the early education of children. Advocating Wittgenstein, I claim that persuasion involves imparting to a pupil about a particular worl...
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  • Calling Solomon’s Bluff: Ethics, Aspect‐Perception and the Unity of the Tractatus.Michael Campbell - 2020 - Philosophical Investigations 43 (3):223-253.
    Philosophical Investigations, EarlyView.
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  • Emotions as Embodied Expressions: Wittgenstein on the Inner Life.Lucilla Guidi - 2019 - Humana Mente 12 (36).
    In this paper I will examine the embodied dimension of emotions, and of inner life more generally, according to Wittgenstein’s anti-subjectivistic account of expression. First of all, I will explore Wittgenstein’s critique of a Cartesian disembodied account of the inner life, and the related argument against the existence of a private language. Secondly, I will describe the constitution of inner life as the acquisition of embodied ways of expressing oneself and of responding to others within a shared context, against the (...)
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  • Political Imagination and the Crime of Crimes: Coming to Terms with ‘Genocide’ and ‘Genocide Blindness’.Mathias Thaler - 2014 - Contemporary Political Theory 13 (4):358-379.
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  • An Enactivist Approach to the Imagination: Embodied Enactments and "Fictional Emotions".José Medina - 2013 - American Philosophical Quarterly 50 (3):317.
    While in the movies or reading a novel, how can we feel terrified by monsters, ghosts, and fictional serial killers? And how can we feel sad or outraged by depictions of cruelty? After all, we know that the imagined threats that we fear do not exist and, therefore, pose no real threat to us; and we know that the instances of cruelty that bring tears to our eyes have not happened. And yet, the fear, the sadness, or the outrage experienced (...)
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  • Nietzsche and Moral Inquiry: Posing the Question of the Value of Our Moral Values.Adam Leach - 2018 - Dissertation, University of Essex
    The continued presence and importance of Christian moral values in our daily lives, coupled with the fact that faith in Christianity is in continual decline, raises the question as to why having lost faith in Christianity, we have also not lost faith in our Christian moral values. This question is also indicative of a more pressing phenomenon: not only have we maintained our faith in Christian values, we fail to see that the widespread collapse of Christianity should affect this faith. (...)
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  • Aspect-Perception as a Philosophical Method.Reshef Agam-Segal - 2015 - Nordic Wittgenstein Review 4 (1):93-121.
    Inducing aspect-experiences – the sudden seeing of something anew, as when a face suddenly strikes us as familiar – can be used as a philosophical method. In seeing aspects, I argue, we let ourselves experience what it would be like to conceptualize something in a particular way, apart from any conceptual routine. We can use that experience to examine our ways of conceptualizing things, and re-evaluate the ways we make sense of them. I claim that we are not always passive (...)
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  • Wittgenstein on Verification and Seeing-As, 1930–1932.Andreas Blank - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (6):614 - 632.
    Abstract This article examines the little-explored remarks on verification in Wittgenstein's notebooks during the period between 1930 and 1932. In these remarks, Wittgenstein connects a verificationist theory of meaning with the notion of logical multiplicity, understood as a space of possibilities: a proposition is verified by a fact if and only if the proposition and the fact have the same logical multiplicity. But while in his early philosophy logical multiplicities were analysed as an outcome of the formal properties of simple (...)
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