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The philosophy of alternative logics

In Leila Haaparanta (ed.), The Development of Modern Logic. Oxford University Press. pp. 613-723 (2009)

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  1. A New–Old Characterisation of Logical Knowledge.Ivor Grattan-Guinness - 2012 - History and Philosophy of Logic 33 (3):245 - 290.
    We seek means of distinguishing logical knowledge from other kinds of knowledge, especially mathematics. The attempt is restricted to classical two-valued logic and assumes that the basic notion in logic is the proposition. First, we explain the distinction between the parts and the moments of a whole, and theories of ?sortal terms?, two theories that will feature prominently. Second, we propose that logic comprises four ?momental sectors?: the propositional and the functional calculi, the calculus of asserted propositions, and rules for (...)
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  • Preface.Matteo Pascucci & Adam Tamas Tuboly - 2019 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 26 (3):318-322.
    Special issue: "Reflecting on the Legacy of C.I. Lewis: Contemporary and Historical Perspectives on Modal Logic".
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  • Informational Semantics as a Third Alternative?Patrick Allo & Edwin Mares - 2012 - Erkenntnis 77 (2):167-185.
    Informational semantics were first developed as an interpretation of the model-theory of substructural (and especially relevant) logics. In this paper we argue that such a semantics is of independent value and that it should be considered as a genuine alternative explication of the notion of logical consequence alongside the traditional model-theoretical and the proof-theoretical accounts. Our starting point is the content-nonexpansion platitude which stipulates that an argument is valid iff the content of the conclusion does not exceed the combined content (...)
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  • The Formal Failure and Social Success of Logic.William Brooke & Andrew Aberdein - 2011 - In Frank Zenker (ed.), Argumentation: Cognition & community. Proceedings of the 9th International Conference of the Ontario Society for the Study of Argumentation (OSSA), May 18–21, 2011. OSSA.
    Is formal logic a failure? It may be, if we accept the context-independent limits imposed by Russell, Frege, and others. In response to difficulties arising from such limitations I present a Toulmin-esque social recontextualization of formal logic. The results of my project provide a positive view of formal logic as a success while simultaneously reaffirming the social and contextual concerns of argumentation theorists, critical thinking scholars, and rhetoricians.
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  • The Development of Modern Logic.John P. Burgess - 2011 - History and Philosophy of Logic 32 (2):187 - 191.
    History and Philosophy of Logic, Volume 32, Issue 2, Page 187-191, May 2011.
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  • How Do Logics Explain?Nicole Wyatt & Gillman Payette - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (1):157-167.
    Anti-exceptionalists about logic maintain that it is continuous with the empirical sciences. Taking anti-exceptionalism for granted, we argue that traditional approaches to explanation are inadequate in the case of logic. We argue that Andrea Woody's functional analysis of explanation is a better fit with logical practice and accounts better for the explanatory role of logical theories.
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  • Omnipresence, Multipresence and Ubiquity: Kinds of Generality in and Around Mathematics and Logics. [REVIEW]I. Grattan-Guinness - 2011 - Logica Universalis 5 (1):21-73.
    A prized property of theories of all kinds is that of generality, of applicability or least relevance to a wide range of circumstances and situations. The purpose of this article is to present a pair of distinctions that suggest that three kinds of generality are to be found in mathematics and logics, not only at some particular period but especially in developments that take place over time: ‘omnipresent’ and ‘multipresent’ theories, and ‘ubiquitous’ notions that form dependent parts, or moments, of (...)
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