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  1. Pure Hyperbolic Discount Curves Predict “Eyes Open” Self-Control.George Ainslie - 2012 - Theory and Decision 73 (1):3-34.
    The models of internal self-control that have recently been proposed by behavioral economists do not depict motivational interaction that occurs while temptation is present. Those models that include willpower at all either envision a faculty with a motivation (“strength”) different from the motives that are weighed in the marketplace of choice, or rely on incompatible goals among diverse brain centers. Both assumptions are questionable, but these models’ biggest problem is that they do not let resolutions withstand re-examination while being challenged (...)
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  • Rational Choice Virtues.Bruno Verbeek - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (5):541-559.
    In this essay, I review some results that suggest that rational choice theory has interesting things to say about the virtues. In particular, I argue that rational choice theory can show, first, the role of certain virtues in a game-theoretic analysis of norms. Secondly, that it is useful in the characterization of these virtues. Finally, I discuss how rational choice theory can be brought to bear upon the justification of these virtues by showing how they contribute to a flourishing life. (...)
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  • A Scientific Fix for the Classical Account of Addiction.Jeffrey Foss - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):579-579.
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  • Intentional Time Inconsistency.Agah R. Turan - 2019 - Theory and Decision 86 (1):41-64.
    We propose a theoretical model to explain the usage of time-inconsistent behavior as a strategy to exploit others when reputation and trust have secondary effects on the economic outcome. We consider two agents with time-consistent preferences exploiting common resources. Supposing that an agent is believed to have time-inconsistent preferences with probability p, we analyze whether she uses this misinformation when she has the opportunity to use it. Using the model originally provided by Levhari and Mirman (Bell J Econ 11(1):322–334, 1980), (...)
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  • Sunk ‘Decision Points’: A Theory of the Endowment Effect and Present Bias.Peter Landry - 2019 - Theory and Decision 86 (1):23-39.
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  • De Gustibus Disputare: Hyperbolic Delay Discounting Integrates Five Approaches to Impulsive Choice.George Ainslie - 2017 - Journal of Economic Methodology 24 (2):166-189.
    Impulsiveness is the tendency to shift preference from a better, later option to a poorer, earlier option as the two get closer. Explanations have extrapolated from five piecemeal elements of psychology – failure of cognitive rationality, Pavlovian conditioning, force of habit, incentive salience, and long chains of secondary reward – but in doing so have created models that stretch the properties of these elements as observed in the laboratory. The models are hard to integrate with each other, much less with (...)
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  • Beyond Dualities in Behavioural Economics: What Can G. H. Mead’s Conceptions of Self and Reflexivity Contribute to the Current Debate?Carsten Herrmann-Pillath - 2019 - Journal of Economic Methodology 26 (2):118-132.
    ABSTRACTDual systems theories play an important role in the conceptual foundations of behavioural economics, such as distinguishing between ‘fast’ and ‘slow’ responses to stimuli. After critically reflecting their empirical validity in the light of recent research in psychology and the neurosciences, I argue that their major flaw is the inadequate treatment of reflection. I introduce the distinction between ‘reflectivity’ and ‘reflexivity’, showing that human action involves complex brain connectivities that integrate the two systems, as understood traditionally. G. H. Mead’s distinction (...)
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  • Neural Networks, Real Patterns, and the Mathematics of Constrained Optimization: An Interview with Don Ross.Don Ross - 2016 - Erasmus Journal for Philosophy and Economics 9 (1):142.
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  • Decisions, Diachronic Autonomy, and the Division of Deliberative Labor.Luca Ferrero - 2010 - Philosophers' Imprint 10:1-23.
    It is often argued that future-directed decisions are effective at shaping our future conduct because they give rise, at the time of action, to a decisive reason to act as originally decided. In this paper, I argue that standard accounts of decision-based reasons are unsatisfactory. For they focus either on tie-breaking scenarios or cases of self-directed distal manipulation. I argue that future-directed decisions are better understood as tools for the non-manipulative, intrapersonal division of deliberative labor over time. A future-directed decision (...)
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  • Three Ways of Spilling Ink Tomorrow.Luca Ferrero - 2006 - In E. Baccarini & S. Prijic-Samarzija (eds.), Rationality in Belief and Action. Rijeka. pp. 95-127.
    There are three ways to control our future conduct: by causing it, by manipulating our future selves, or by taking future-directed decisions. I show that the standard accounts of future-directed decisions fail to do justice to their distinctive contribution in intentional diachronic agency. The standard accounts can be divided in two categories: First, those that conflate the operation of decisions with that of devices for either physical constraint or manipulative self-management. Second, accounts that, although they acknowledge the non-manipulative nature of (...)
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  • A Research-Based Theory of Addictive Motivation.G. Ainslie - 2000 - Law and Philosophy 19 (1):77-115.
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  • Examining Procrastination Across Multiple Goal Stages: A Longitudinal Study of Temporal Motivation Theory.Piers Steel, Frode Svartdal, Tomas Thundiyil & Thomas Brothen - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • A Unified Framework for Addiction: Vulnerabilities in the Decision Process.A. David Redish, Steve Jensen & Adam Johnson - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):415-437.
    The understanding of decision-making systems has come together in recent years to form a unified theory of decision-making in the mammalian brain as arising from multiple, interacting systems (a planning system, a habit system, and a situation-recognition system). This unified decision-making system has multiple potential access points through which it can be driven to make maladaptive choices, particularly choices that entail seeking of certain drugs or behaviors. We identify 10 key vulnerabilities in the system: (1) moving away from homeostasis, (2) (...)
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  • Vulnerabilities to Addiction Must Have Their Impact Through the Common Currency of Discounted Reward.George Ainslie - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (4):438-439.
    The ten vulnerabilities discussed in the target article vary in their likelihood of producing temporary preference for addictive activities automatic” habits discussed here.
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  • Metacognitive Control of Categorial Neurobehavioral Decision Systems.Gordon R. Foxall - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Syllogism of Neuro-Economics.Camillo Padoa-Schioppa - 2008 - Economics and Philosophy 24 (3):449-457.
    If neuroscience is to contribute to economics, it will do so by the way of psychology. Neural data can and do lead to better psychological theories, and psychological insights can and do lead to better economic models. Hence, neuroscience can in principle contribute to economics. Whether it actually will do so is an empirical question and the jury is still out. Economics currently faces theoretical and empirical challenges analogous to those faced by physics at the turn of the twentieth century (...)
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  • Making Room for Options: Moral Reasons, Imperfect Duties, and Choice: Patricia Greenspan.Patricia Greenspan - 2010 - Social Philosophy and Policy 27 (2):181-205.
    An imperfect duty such as the duty to aid those in need is supposed to leave leeway for choice as to how to satisfy it, but if our reason for a certain way of satisfying it is our strongest, that leeway would seem to be eliminated. This paper defends a conception of practical reasons designed to preserve it, without slighting the binding force of moral requirements, though it allows us to discount certain moral reasons. Only reasons that offer criticism of (...)
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  • Selfish Goals Must Compete for the Common Currency of Reward.George Ainslie - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):135-136.
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  • Pleasure and Aversion: Challenging the Conventional Dichotomy.George Ainslie - 2009 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (4):357 – 377.
    Philosophy and its descendents in the behavioral sciences have traditionally divided incentives into those that are sought and those that are avoided. Positive incentives are held to be both attractive and memorable because of the direct effects of pleasure. Negative incentives are held to be unattractive but still memorable (the problem of pain) because they force unpleasant emotions on an individual by an unmotivated process, either a hardwired response (unconditioned response) or one substituted by association (conditioned response). Negative incentives are (...)
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  • Truth, Authenticity, and Rationality.Ronald de Sousa - 2007 - Dialectica 61 (3):323-345.
    Emotions are Janus‐faced. They tell us something about the world, and they tell us something about ourselves. This suggests that we might speak of a truth, or perhaps two kinds of truths of emotions, one of which is about self and the other about conditions in the world. On some views, the latter comes by means of the former. Insofar as emotions manifest our inner life, however, we are more inclined to speak of authenticity rather than truth. What is the (...)
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  • Models of Misbelief: Integrating Motivational and Deficit Theories of Delusions.Ryan McKay, Robyn Langdon & Max Coltheart - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):932-941.
    The impact of our desires and preferences upon our ordinary, everyday beliefs is well-documented [Gilovich, T. . How we know what isn’t so: The fallibility of human reason in everyday life. New York: The Free Press.]. The influence of such motivational factors on delusions, which are instances of pathological misbelief, has tended however to be neglected by certain prevailing models of delusion formation and maintenance. This paper explores a distinction between two general classes of theoretical explanation for delusions; the motivational (...)
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  • Addiction is Not as Puzzling as It Seems.Jim Orford - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):591-592.
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  • Which Behavioral Consequences Matter? The Importance of Frame of Reference in Explaining Addiction.Gene M. Heyman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):599-610.
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  • Heyman's Steady-State Theory of Addiction.Stuart A. Vyse - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):598-599.
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  • Addiction as Choice? Yes. As Melioration? Maybe, Maybe Not.Rudy E. Vuchinich - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):597-598.
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  • Matching Observation to Addiction Theory.Robert M. Swift - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):596-597.
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  • The Janus Faces of Addiction.Peter Shizgal - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):595-596.
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  • The Contradiction Unresolved.Thomas C. Schelling - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):595-595.
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  • The Pursuit of Value: Sensitization or Tolerance?Terry E. Robinson & Kent C. Berridge - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):594-595.
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  • In Search of the Relevant Behavioral Variables.Joseph J. Plaud - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):593-594.
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  • Addiction Requires Philosophical Explanation, Not Mere Redescription.Christian Perring - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):592-593.
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  • Stimulus Factors in Addiction.John A. Nevin - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):590-591.
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  • Maximization Should Sometimes Lead to Abstinence.Suzanne H. Mitchell & William M. Baum - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):589-590.
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  • Relationship Between Melioration and the Controlling Variables.Richard A. Meisch & Ralph Spiga - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):588-589.
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  • Positive Reinforcement, the Matching Law and Morality.William A. McKim - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):587-588.
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  • Who is at Risk for Addiction?Dennis McFarland - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):587-587.
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  • Is Melioration the Addiction Theory of Choice?Robert J. MacCoun - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):586-587.
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  • Understanding Addiction: Conventional Rewards and Lack of Control.Clark McCauley - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):585-586.
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  • An Economic Perspective on Addiction and Matching.David I. Laibson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):583-584.
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  • Self-Control and Impulsiveness: Resolution of Apparent Contradictions in Choice Behavior.A. W. Logue - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):584-585.
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  • Future Directions for the Melioration Model of Addiction.Kris N. Kirby - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):583-583.
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  • Addiction: Taking the Brain Seriously.Steven E. Hyman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):582-582.
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  • Who Determines the Value of Drug-Taking Behavior? Cultural Considerations for a Theory of Behavioral Choice.Riley E. Hinson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):580-581.
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  • Melioration and Addiction.Alasdair I. Houston - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):581-582.
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  • Behavioral Choice Theory Can Enhance Our Understanding of Drug Dependence and Other Behavioral Disorders.Stephen T. Higgins - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):579-580.
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  • The Behavioral Economics of Addiction: A Comprehensive Alternative.Edmund Fantino - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):578-579.
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  • Matching and Melioration as Accounts of Reinforcement and Drug Addiction.Marc N. Branch - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):577-578.
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  • Control Versus Causation of Addiction.Kent C. Berridge & Terry E. Robinson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):576-577.
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  • How Do People Choose Between Local and Global Bookkeeping?George Ainslie - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):574-575.
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  • The Ameliorating Addict: An Illusion Reviewed.Jack Bergman & Klaus A. Miczek - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):575-576.
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