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  1. Hate Speech and Distorted Communication: Rethinking the Limits of Incitement.Sarah Sorial - 2015 - Law and Philosophy 34 (3):299-324.
    Hate speech is commonly defined with reference to the legal category of incitement. Laws targeting incitement typically focus on how the speech is expressed rather than its actual content. This has a number of unintended consequences: first, law tends to capture overt or obvious forms of hate speech and not hate speech that takes the form of ‘reasoned’ argument, but which nevertheless, causes as much, if not more harm. Second, the focus on form rather than content leads to categorization errors. (...)
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  • Narrating Hostility, Challenging Hostile Narratives.Fabienne Baider & Monika Kopytowska - 2018 - Lodz Papers in Pragmatics 14 (1):1-24.
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  • Practising Critique, Attending to Truth: The Pedagogy of Discriminatory Speech.Valerie Harwood & Mary Lou Rasmussen - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (8):874-884.
    Teaching in university education programmes, can, at times, involve the uncomfortable situation of discriminatory speech.A situation that has often occurred in our own teaching, and in those of our colleagues, is the citation of homophobic and heterosexist comments.These are comments that are more likely to occur in foundation subjects such as philosophy and sociology of education.The occurrence of such situations has prompted debate regarding ‘silencing words that wound’. This has prompted the question, ‘should we keep students from stating such discriminatory (...)
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  • Silence, Words That Wound and Sexual Identity: A Conversation with Applebaum.Liz Jackson - 2008 - Journal of Moral Education 37 (2):225-238.
    In this paper, I continue a conversation initiated by Barbara Applebaum on how to manage irreconcilable difference, harmful language or 'words that wound' and various implications of power in the classroom. Referencing emerging works on the nature of speech and silence, classroom power and queer identity, I pose three questions to Applebaum in order to continue thinking through the timely situations with which she grapples. What is the nature of reasonableness is the classroom setting? Must speech reflect power; and silence, (...)
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  • Moral Imagination in Education: A Deweyan Proposal for Teachers Responding to Hate Speech.Emma Arneback - 2014 - Journal of Moral Education 43 (3):269-281.
    This article is about moments when teachers experience hate speech in education and need to act. Based on John Dewey’s work on moral philosophy and examples from teaching practice, I would like to contribute to the discussion about moral education by emphasizing the following: the importance of experience, the problem with prescribed morals and the need for moral imagination in education. My Deweyan proposal for teachers responding to hate speech in education is to use moral imagination in education and take (...)
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