Switch to: References

Citations of:

A Tale of Two Doctrines: Moral Encroachment and Doxastic Wronging

In Jennifer Lackey (ed.), Applied Epistemology. Oxford University Press. pp. 99-118 (2021)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Replies to Cepollaro and Torrengo, Táíwò, and Amoretti.Jason Stanley - 2018 - Disputatio 10 (51):345-359.
    In this short piece belonging to a book symposium on my book How Propaganda Works, I reply to the objections, comments and suggestions provided by the contributors: Bianca Cepollaro and Giuliano Torrengo, Olúfémi O. Táíwò, and Maria Cristina Amoretti. I show how some of the objections can be accommodated by the framework adopted in the book, but also how various comments and suggestions have contributed to the development, in future work, of several threads pertaining to the general view put forward (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Privacy Rights Engender Direct Doxastic Duties.Lauritz Aastrup Munch - 2021 - Journal of Value Inquiry 56 (4):547-562.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • What Should Relational Egalitarians Believe?Anne-Sofie Greisen Hojlund - 2021 - Sage Publications: Politics, Philosophy and Economics 21 (1):55-74.
    Politics, Philosophy & Economics, Volume 21, Issue 1, Page 55-74, February 2022. Many find that the objectionable nature of paternalism has something to do with belief. However, since it is commonly held that beliefs are directly governed by epistemic as opposed to moral norms, how could it be objectionable to hold paternalistic beliefs about others if they are supported by the evidence? Drawing on central elements of relational egalitarianism, this paper attempts to bridge this gap. In a first step, it (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Moral Encroachment and Positive Profiling.Lisa Cassell - forthcoming - Erkenntnis:1-21.
    Some claim that moral factors affect the epistemic status of our beliefs. Call this the moral encroachment thesis. It’s been argued that the moral encroachment thesis can explain at least part of the wrongness of racial profiling. The thesis predicts that the high moral stakes in cases of racial profiling make it more difficult for these racist beliefs to be justified or to constitute knowledge. This paper considers a class of racial generalizations that seem to do just the opposite of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ethics of Expectations.Rima Basu -
    This paper asks two questions about the ethics of expectations: one about the nature of expectations, and one about the wrongs of expectations. Expectations involve a rich constellation of attitudes ranging from beliefs to also include imaginings, hopes, fears, and dreams. As a result, it would be a mistake to treat expectation as merely a theoretical, practical, or evaluative attitude. Sometimes expectations are predictive, like your expectation of rain tomorrow, sometimes prescriptive, like the expectation that your students will do the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ethics and Imagination.Joy Shim & Shen-yi Liao - forthcoming - In James Harold (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethics and Art. Oxford University Press.
    In this chapter, we identify and present predominant debates at the intersection of ethics and imagination. We begin by examining issues on whether our imagination can be constrained by ethical considerations, such as the moral evaluation of imagination, the potential for morality’s constraining our imaginative abilities, and the possibility of moral norms’ governing our imaginings. Then, we present accounts that posit imagination’s integral role in cultivating ethical lives, both through engagements with narrative artworks and in reality. Our final topic of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Risky Inquiry: Developing an Ethics for Philosophical Practice.Rima Basu - forthcoming - Hypatia.
    Philosophical inquiry strives to be the unencumbered exploration of ideas. That is, unlike scientific research which is subject to ethical oversight, it is commonly thought that it would either be inappropriate, or that it would undermine what philosophy fundamentally is, if philosophical research were subject to similar ethical oversight. Against this, I argue that philosophy is in need of a reckoning. Philosophical inquiry is a morally hazardous practice with its own risks. There are risks present in the methods we employ, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark