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  1. Selfhood and Self-Government in Women’s Religious Writings of the Early Modern Period.Jacqueline Broad - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (5):713-730.
    Some scholars have identified a puzzle in the writings of Mary Astell (1666–1731), a deeply religious feminist thinker of the early modern period. On the one hand, Astell strongly urges her fellow women to preserve their independence of judgement from men; yet, on the other, she insists upon those same women maintaining a submissive deference to the Anglican church. These two positions appear to be incompatible. In this paper, I propose a historical-contextualist solution to the puzzle: I argue that the (...)
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  • Mary Astell on Bad Custom and Epistemic Injustice.Allauren Samantha Forbes - 2019 - Hypatia 34 (4):777-801.
    Mary Astell is a fascinating seventeenth‐century figure whose work admits of many interpretations. One feature of her work that has received little attention is her focus on bad custom. This is surprising; Astell clearly regards bad custom as exerting a kind of epistemic power over agents, particularly women, in a way that limits their intellectual capacities. This article aims to link two contemporary sociopolitical/social‐epistemological projects by showing how a seventeenth‐century thinker anticipated these projects. Astell's account of bad custom shows that (...)
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  • Mary Astell’s Radical Criticism of Gender Inequality.Martin Fog Lantz Arndal - 2021 - Intellectual History Review 31 (1):91-110.
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  • Mary Astell.M. Sowal - 2005 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • ‘Slaves Among Us’: The Climate and Character of Eighteenth-Century Philosophical Discussions of Slavery.Margaret Watkins - 2017 - Philosophy Compass 12 (1):e12393.
    This article introduces several aspects of eighteenth-century discussions of slavery that may be unfamiliar or surprising to present-day readers. First, even eighteenth-century philosophers who were opponents of slavery often exhibited marked racism and helped develop racial concepts that would later serve pro-slavery theorists. Such thinkers include Hume, Voltaire, and Kant. Second, we must see slavery debates in the context of larger scientific and political debates, including those about climate and character, just political systems, the superiority or inferiority of the moderns (...)
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