Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. La ontología tras bastidores. Un problema metafísico para el naturalismo genético.Miguel Ángel Pérez Jiménez - 2016 - Universitas Philosophica 33 (66):61-76.
    Este trabajo es una crítica de ciertas concepciones de lo que llamamos una perspectiva genética de la naturalización: la tarea de investigar cómo la razón emerge del mundo natural. Para desarrollar nuestra crítica tomamos como marco de referencia dos importantes propuestas de Donald Davidson: el monismo anómalo y la analogía de la triangulación. Nuestro problema es el carácter metafísico del monismo y sus implicaciones para la empresa genética de naturalización de la razón. Defendemos que la concepción metafísica de la naturaleza (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Agency and Moral Status.Jeff Sebo - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (1):1-22.
    According to our traditional conception of agency, most human beings are agents and most, if not all, nonhuman animals are not. However, recent developments in philosophy and psychology have made it clear that we need more than one conception of agency, since human and nonhuman animals are capable of thinking and acting in more than one kind of way. In this paper, I make a distinction between perceptual and propositional agency, and I argue that many nonhuman animals are perceptual agents (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Emotions in the Wild: The Situated Perspective on Emotion.Paul Edmund Griffiths & Andrea Scarantino - 2005 - In P. Robbins & Murat Aydede (eds.), The Cambridge Handbook of Situated Cognition. Cambridge University Press.
    This chapter describes a perspective on emotion, according to which emotions are: 1. Designed to function in a social context: an emotion is often an act of relationship reconfiguration brought about by delivering a social signal; 2. Forms of skillful engagement with the world which need not be mediated by conceptual thought; 3. Scaffolded by the environment, both synchronically in the unfolding of a particular emotional performance and diachronically, in the acquisition of an emotional repertoire; 4. Dynamically coupled to an (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Expansive Agency in Multi-Activity Collaboration.Katsuhiro Yamazumi - 2009 - In Annalisa Sannino, Harry Daniels & Kris D. Gutierrez (eds.), Learning and Expanding with Activity Theory. Cambridge University Press. pp. 212--227.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Propositional Attitudes, Intentional Contents and Other Representationalist Myths.Hans Johann Glock - unknown
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • I processi biocognitivi dell’educazione.Anita Gramigna - 2018 - Research Trends in Humanities Education & Philosophy 5:40-46.
    Questo articolo studia la natura dinamica della conoscenza per giungere a meglio identificarne i suoi congegni formativi, nel versante epistemico come in quello applicativo. La metafora di Jacob sulla natura come “bricoleur” è, nelle nostre intenzioni, una cornice descrittiva di come agisce l’intelligenza e si muove. Si chiarirà la relazione fra biologia e pedagogia, al fine di elaborare ipotesi operative. La prospettiva eremeneutica utilizzerà la categoria di “estetica realazionale” messa a punto da Bateson quale base di una teoria della conoscenza (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Representaciones del cuerpo. Orientación de la acción y contenido no conceptual.Luis Alejandro Murillo Lara - 2018 - Ideas Y Valores 67:129-148.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Feature-Placing and Proto-Objects.Austen Clark - 2004 - Philosophical Psychology 17 (4):443-469.
    This paper contrasts three different schemes of reference relevant to understanding systems of perceptual representation: a location-based system dubbed "feature-placing", a system of "visual indices" referring to things called "proto-objects", and the full sortal-based individuation allowed by a natural language. The first three sections summarize some of the key arguments (in Clark, 2000) to the effect that the early, parallel, and pre-attentive registration of sensory features itself constitutes a simple system of nonconceptual mental representation. In particular, feature integration--perceiving something as (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • Putting Thoughts to Work: Concepts, Systematicity, and Stimulus-Independence.Elisabeth Camp - 2009 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (2):275-311.
    I argue that we can reconcile two seemingly incompatible traditions for thinking about concepts. On the one hand, many cognitive scientists assume that the systematic redeployment of representational abilities suffices for having concepts. On the other hand, a long philosophical tradition maintains that language is necessary for genuinely conceptual thought. I argue that on a theoretically useful and empirically plausible concept of 'concept', it is necessary and sufficient for conceptual thought that a thinker be able to entertain many of the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Representation and Knowledge Are Not the Same Thing.Leslie Smith - 1999 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):784-785.
    Two standard epistemological accounts are conflated in Dienes & Perner's account of knowledge, and this conflation requires the rejection of their four conditions of knowledge. Because their four metarepresentations applied to the explicit-implicit distinction are paired with these conditions, it follows by modus tollens that if the latter are inadequate, then so are the former. Quite simply, their account misses the link between true reasoning and knowledge.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Semantic Responsibility.Josefa Toribio - 2002 - Philosophical Explorations 5 (1):39-58.
    In this paper I attempt to develop a notion of responsibility (semantic responsibility) that is to the notion of belief what epistemic responsibility is to the notion of justification. 'Being semantically responsible' is shown to involve the fulfilment of cognitive duties which allow the agent to engage in the kind of reason-laden discourses which render her beliefs appropriately sensitive to correction. The concept of semantic responsibility suggests that the notion of belief found in contemporary philosophical debates about content implicitly encompasses (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Qualifying Qualia Through the Skyhook Test.Tere Vadén - 2001 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 44 (2):149-169.
    If we are to preserve qualia, one possibility is to take the current academic, philosophical, and theoretical notion less seriously and current natural science and some pre-theoretical intuitions about qualia more seriously. Dennett (1997) is instrumental in showing how ideas of the intrinsicalness and privacy of qualia are misguided and those of ineffability and immediacy misinterpreted. However, by combining ideas of non-mechanicalness used in contemporary natural science with the pre-theoretical idea that qualia are special because they are unique, we get (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Epistemic Agency and Metacognition: An Externalist View.Joëlle Proust - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):241-268.
    Controlling one's mental agency encompasses two forms of metacognitive operations, self-probing and post-evaluating. Metacognition so defined might seem to fuel an internalist view of epistemic norms, where rational feelings are available to instruct a thinker of what she can do, and allow her to be responsible for her mental agency. Such a view, however, ignores the dynamics of the mind–world interactions that calibrate the epistemic sentiments as reliable indicators of epistemic norms. A 'brain in the lab' thought experiment suggests that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Nonconceptual Content and the Elimination of Misconceived Composites!Adrian Cussins - 1993 - Mind and Language 8 (2):234-252.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • XIII-Epistemic Agency and Metacognition: An Externalist View.Joëlle Proust - 2008 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 108 (1pt3):241-268.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Minding Matter/Mattering Mind: Knowledge and the Subject in Nineteenth-Century Psychology.John Carson - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 30 (3):345-376.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Multiplicity, Criticism and Knowing What to Do Next: Way‐Finding in a Transmodern World. Response to Meera Nanda’sProphets Facing Backwards.David Turnbull - 2005 - Social Epistemology 19 (1):19 – 32.
    The paper addresses the question of whether, as Nanda claims, treating all knowledge traditions including science as local, denies the possibility of criticism. It accepts the necessity for criticism but denies that science can be the sole arbiter of truth and argues that we have to live with holding differing knowledges in tension with one another.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • From 'Activity' to 'Labour': Commodification, Labourpower and Contradiction in Engeström's Activity Theory.Paul Warmington - 2008 - Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 10 (2):4-19.
    Engeström’s (1987, 1999) innovations in cultural-historical activity theory emphasise the role of contradictions in analysing and transforming learning in practice. This paper considers some of the problems and possibilities contained in his analytical understanding of contradictions, in relation to activity and to what he terms ‘expansive learning’ (Engeström, 2001, 2004, 2007). In doing so, it builds upon Engeström’s stated concern with theorising activities ‘in capitalism’. Its goal is to problematise the underlying practical definition of contradictions and the claims made for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Husserl’s Theory of Belief and the Heideggerean Critique.Jeffrey Yoshimi - 2009 - Husserl Studies 25 (2):121-140.
    I develop a “two-systems” interpretation of Husserl’s theory of belief. On this interpretation, Husserl accounts for our sense of the world in terms of (1) a system of embodied horizon meanings and passive synthesis, which is involved in any experience of an object, and (2) a system of active synthesis and sedimentation, which comes on line when we attend to an object’s properties. I use this account to defend Husserl against several forms of Heideggerean critique. One line of critique, recently (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Nonconceptual Content.Josefa Toribio - 2007 - Philosophy Compass 2 (3):445–460.
    Nonconceptualists maintain that there are ways of representing the world that do not reflect the concepts a creature possesses. They claim that the content of these representational states is genuine content because it is subject to correctness conditions, but it is nonconceptual because the creature to which we attribute it need not possess any of the concepts involved in the specification of that content. Appeals to nonconceptual content have seemed especially useful in attempts to capture the representational properties of perceptual (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Meaning in the Lives of Humans and Other Animals.Duncan Purves & Nicolas Delon - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (2):317-338.
    This paper argues that contemporary philosophical literature on meaning in life has important implications for the debate about our obligations to non-human animals. If animal lives can be meaningful, then practices including factory farming and animal research might be morally worse than ethicists have thought. We argue for two theses about meaning in life: that the best account of meaningful lives must take intentional action to be necessary for meaning—an individual’s life has meaning if and only if the individual acts (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Sartre: Between Realism and Idealism?Gregory McCulloch - 1993 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 1 (2):286 – 301.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Is the Body Represented in Everyday Bodily Activities?Luis Alejandro Murillo Lara - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (3):591-604.
    There seem to be good reasons to think that there must be body representations or some kind of body content required for riding a bike or grabbing a cup of coffee. However, when I ride a bike or grab a cup of coffee, am I just representing the bike and the cup? Or am I actually also representing my body and bodily movements? The thesis of this paper is that the body not only figures in the content that guides everyday (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Minding Matter/Mattering Mind: Knowledge and the Subject in Nineteenth-Century Psychology.J. Carson - 1999 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 30 (3):345-376.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Nonconceptual Content and the Elimination of Misonceived Composites.Adrian Cussins - 1993 - Mind and Language 8 (2):234-52.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Case for Proprioception.Ellen Fridland - 2011 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):521-540.
    In formulating a theory of perception that does justice to the embodied and enactive nature of perceptual experience, proprioception can play a valuable role. Since proprioception is necessarily embodied, and since proprioceptive experience is particularly integrated with one’s bodily actions, it seems clear that proprioception, in addition to, e.g., vision or audition, can provide us with valuable insights into the role of an agent’s corporal skills and capacities in constituting or structuring perceptual experience. However, if we are going to have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Meaning and Other Non-Biological Categories.Josefa Toribio - 1998 - Philosophical Papers 27 (2):129-150.
    In this paper I display a general metaphysical assumption that characterizes basic naturalistic views and that is inherited, in a residual form, by their leading teleological rivals. The assumption is that intentional states require identifiable inner vehicles and that to explain intentional properties we must develop accounts that bind specific contents to specific vehicles. I show that this assumption is deeply rooted in representationalist and reductionist theories of content and I argue that it is deeply inappropriate. I sketch the main (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Compositionality, Iconicity, and Perceptual Nonconceptualism.Josefa Toribio - 2011 - Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):177-193.
    This paper concerns the role of the structural properties of representations in determining the nature of their content. I take as a starting point Fodor's (2007) and Heck's (2007) recent arguments making the iconic structure of perceptual representations essential in establishing their content as content of a different (nonconceptual) kind. I argue that the prima facie state?content error this strategy seems to display is nothing but a case of ?state?content error error,? i.e., the mistake of considering that the properties that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Can Animals Judge?Hans-Johann Glock - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (1):11-33.
    This article discusses the problems which concepts pose for the attribution of thoughts to animals. It locates these problems within a range of other issues concerning animal minds, and presents a ‘lingualist master argument’ according to which one cannot entertain a thought without possessing its constituent concepts and cannot possess concepts without possessing language. The first premise is compelling if one accepts the building‐block model of concepts as parts of wholes – propositions – and the idea that intentional verbs signify (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Archives in Formation: Privileged Spaces, Popular Archives and Paper Trails.Michael Lynch - 1999 - History of the Human Sciences 12 (2):65-87.
    The article begins with Derrida’s etymology of the word ‘archive’: a privileged site to which records are officially consigned and in which they are guarded by legal authority. It explores contemporary variations on the theme of archive. The cases presented include efforts to construct scholarly archives that stand as personal monuments, struggles over the collection and consignment of records during official investigations of government scandals, and the ‘popular archive’ produced by the media spectacle surrounding the O. J. Simpson trial. The (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Can Animals Judge?Hans-Johann Glock - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (1):11-33.
    This article discusses the problems which concepts pose for the attribution of thoughts to animals. It locates these problems within a range of other issues concerning animal minds ( section 1 ), and presents a 'lingualist master argument' according to which one cannot entertain a thought without possessing its constituent concepts and cannot possess concepts without possessing language ( section 2 ). The first premise is compelling if one accepts the building-block model of concepts as parts of wholes – propositions (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Performance and Narrative, Bodies and Movement in the Construction of Places and Objects, Spaces and Knowledges.D. Turnbull - 2002 - Theory, Culture and Society 19 (5-6):125-143.
    The article explores the ways knowledge and space are co-produced performatively through bodily movement in an examination of the Maltese megaliths the first complex stone structures in the world. It is argued that knowledge is best seen as spatialized narratives of human actions and objects as materialized forms of those spatial narratives. Rewriting our social and historical narratives so that the performativity of place, space and knowledge is restored opens new possibilities for rethinking the social and material order.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Environmental Representation of the Body.Adrian Cussins - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):15-32.
    Much recent cognitive neuroscientific work on body knowledge is representationalist: “body schema” and “body images”, for example, are cerebral representations of the body (de Vignemont 2009). A framework assumption is that representation of the body plays an important role in cognition. The question is whether this representationalist assumption is compatible with the variety of broadly situated or embodied approaches recently popular in the cognitive neurosciences: approaches in which cognition is taken to have a ‘direct’ relation to the body and to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Skill Theory V2.0: Dispositions, Emulation, and Spatial Perception.Rick Grush - 2007 - Synthese 159 (3):389 - 416.
    An attempt is made to defend a general approach to the spatial content of perception, an approach according to which perception is imbued with spatial content in virtue of certain kinds of connections between perceiving organism's sensory input and its behavioral output. The most important aspect of the defense involves clearly distinguishing two kinds of perceptuo-behavioral skills—the formation of dispositions, and a capacity for emulation. The former, the formation of dispositions, is argued to by the central pivot of spatial content. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations