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  1. Performance and Inteligibility: Translating Plato’s Ion.Marcus Mota - 2009 - Archai: Revista de Estudos Sobre as Origens Do Pensamento Ocidental 2:131-144.
    Plato’s Ion can be read as exposure of the relationship between text and performance. It’s a philosophical dialogue that exploits performative arguments and situations. I’ll make explicit these dramatic assumptions in the following translation of the Plato’s text.
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  • Pāṇini's Grammar and Modern Computation.John Kadvany - 2016 - History and Philosophy of Logic 37 (4):325-346.
    Pāṇini's fourth century BC Sanskrit grammar uses rewrite rules utilizing an explicit formal language defined through a semi-formal metalanguage. The grammar is generative, meaning that it is capable of expressing a potential infinity of well-formed Sanskrit sentences starting from a finite symbolic inventory. The grammar's operational rules involve extensive use of auxiliary markers, in the form of Sanskrit phonemes, to control grammatical derivations. Pāṇini's rules often utilize a generic context-sensitive format to identify terms used in replacement, modification or deletion operations. (...)
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  • Poststructuralism, Complexity and Poetics.Michael Dillon - 2000 - Theory, Culture and Society 17 (5):1-26.
    Poststructuralism and complexity are plural and diverse modes of thought that share a common subscription to the `anteriority of radical relationality'. They nonetheless subscribe to a different ethic of life because they address the anteriority of radical relationality in different ways. Complexity remains strategic in its bid to become a power-knowledge of the laws of becoming. It derives that strategic ethic from its scientific interest in the implicate order of non-linearity that is said to subvert Newtonian science. Poststructuralism is poetic. (...)
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  • Oral Storytelling as Evidence of Pedagogy in Forager Societies.Michelle Scalise Sugiyama - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Edward N. O'Neil.: Teles (The Cynic Teacher). (Society of Biblical Literature, Texts and Translations Number 11, Graeco-Roman Religion No. 3.) Pp. Xxv + 97. Missoula, Montana: Scholars Press, 1977. Paper. [REVIEW]John Glucker - 1980 - The Classical Review 30 (01):150-151.
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  • Myth and Mind: The Origin of Consciousness in the Discovery of the Sacred.Gregory M. Nixon - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (3):289-338.
    By accepting that the formal structure of human language is the key to understanding the uniquity of human culture and consciousness and by further accepting the late appearance of such language amongst the Cro-Magnon, I am free to focus on the causes that led to such an unprecedented threshold crossing. In the complex of causes that led to human being, I look to scholarship in linguistics, mythology, anthropology, paleontology, and to creation myths themselves for an answer. I conclude that prehumans (...)
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  • Studying Media as Media: McLuhan and the Media Ecology Approach.Lance Strate - 2008 - Mediatropes 1 (1):127-142.
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  • It’s Got Some Meaning but I Am Not Sure….Sarali Gintsburg - 2017 - Pragmatics and Cognition 24 (3):474-495.
    In this research I aim to contribute to a better understanding of transitionality in poetic language by applying for the first time the hypotheses recently developed by pioneers in the emerging field of cognitive poetics to a living tradition. The benefits of working with a living tradition are tremendous: it is easy to establish the literacy level of the authors and the mode of recording of poetic text is also easy to elicit or, when necessary, to control. I chose a (...)
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  • The Flow of Narrative in the Mind Unmoored: An Account of Narrative Processing.Elspeth Jajdelska - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (4):560-583.
    ABSTRACTVerbal narratives provide incomplete information and can be very long, yet readers and hearers often effortlessly fill in the gaps and make connections across long stretches of text, sometimes even finding this immersive. How is this done? In the last few decades, event-indexing situation modeling and complementary accounts of narrative emotion have suggested answers. Despite this progress, comparisons between real-life perception and narrative experience might underplay the way narrative processing modifies our world model, as well as the role of the (...)
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  • Formal Analysis of Recognition Scenes in the Odyssey.Peter Gainsford - 2003 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 123:41-59.
    Type-scenes have been studied and analysed for over seventy years. This paper presents a more detailed analysis of one type-scene, the 'recognition scene', than has previously been attempted, with the aim of moving towards a better-structured understanding of the 'syntax' of type-scenes generally. The structure of the recognition scene is dissected into motifs and 'moves', all of which are tabulated; this is the core of the analysis. The ensuing points of clarification elaborate on the definitions and assumptions built into the (...)
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  • Homer's Sense of Text: Homeric ‘Text’, Cyclic ‘Text’.Ken Dowden - 1996 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 116:47-61.
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  • Commentary on Mitsis.Gisela Striker - 1988 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 4 (1):323-354.
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  • ΚΛΕΟΣ ΑΦΘITON and Oral Theory.Anthony T. Edwards - 1988 - Classical Quarterly 38 (01):25-.
    In a recent article Margalit Finkelberg raises the question of whether or not the phrase κλοσ π;θιτον at Iliad 9.413 is indeed a Homeric formula: λετο μν μοι νóατοσ, τρ κλοσ π;θιτον σται Her purpose is to ‘test the antiquity of κλοσ π;θιτον on the internal grounds of Homeric diction’ .1 Proposing to use specifically the analytic techniques of oral theory, she argues that this phrase does not represent a survival from an Indo-European heroic poetry, as has been suggested from (...)
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  • The Correspondence Metaphor of Memory: Right, Wrong, or Useful?Asher Koriat & Morris Goldsmith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):211-228.
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  • Hypothesis Testing in Experimental and Naturalistic Memory Research.Daniel B. Wright - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):210-211.
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  • Contexts and Functions of Retrieval.Eugene Winograd - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):209-210.
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  • Direct Remembering and the Correspondence Metaphor.K. Geoffrey White - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):208-209.
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  • Classical Antecedents for Modern Metaphors for Memory.Jocelyn Penny Small - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):208-208.
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  • Amnesia and Metamemory Demonstrate the Importance of Both Metaphors.Bennett L. Schwartz - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):207-207.
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  • Operationaling “Correspondence”.David C. Palmer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):206-207.
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  • Beyond the Correspondence Metaphor: When Accuracy Cannot Be Assessed.Ian R. Newby & Michael Ross - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):205-206.
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  • Metacognition, Metaphors, and the Measurement of Human Memory.Thomas O. Nelson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):204-205.
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  • Remembering as Doing.Ulric Neisser - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):203-204.
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  • False Dichotomies and Dead Metaphors.Timothy P. McNamara - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):203-203.
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  • The Phenomenal Object of Memory and Control Processes.Giuliana Mazzoni - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):202-203.
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  • Accuracy and Quantity Are Poor Measures of Recall and Recognition.Andrew R. Mayes, Rob van Eijk & Patricia L. Gooding - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):201-202.
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  • Correspondence to the Past: The Essence of the Archaeology Metaphor.Steen F. Larsen - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):200-201.
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  • Let's Forget the Everyday/Laboratory Controversy.Lia Kvavilashvili & Judi Ellis - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):199-200.
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  • The Storehouse/Correspondence Partition in Memory Research: Promises and Perils.Arie W. Kruglanski - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):198-199.
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  • Driving and Dish-Washing: Failure of the Correspondence Metaphor for Memory.Keith S. Karn & Gregory J. Zelinsky - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):198-198.
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  • Implications of Output-Bound Measures for Laboratory and Field Research in Memory.Ronald P. Fisher - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):197-197.
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  • The Real-Life/Laboratory Controversy as Viewed From the Cognitive Neurobiology of Animal Learning and Memory.Howard Eichenbaum - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):196-197.
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  • What Do Memories Correspond To?Martin A. Conway - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):195-196.
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  • The Correspondence Metaphor: Prescriptive or Descriptive?Darryl Bruce - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):194-195.
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  • Memory, Metamemory, and Conditional Statistics.Robert A. Bjork & Thomas D. Wickens - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):193-194.
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  • The Alternative to the Storehouse Metaphor.Aaron Ben-Ze'ev - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):192-193.
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  • On Correspondence, Accuracy, and Truth.Ian Maynard Begg - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):191-192.
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  • The Relation Between Reproductive and Reconstructive Processing of Memory Content.Harry P. Bahrick - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):191-191.
    Quantitative losses of memory content imply replicative processing; correspondence losses imply reconstructive processing. Research should focus on the relationship between these processes by obtaining accuracy- and quantity-based indicators of memory within the same framework. This approach will also yield information about the effects of task and individual-difference variables on loss and distortion, as well as the time course of each process.
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  • Functional Memory Requires a Quite Different Value Metaphor.Norman H. Anderson - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):190-191.
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  • Everyday Memory and Activity.Richard Alterman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):189-190.
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  • Correspondence Conception of Memory: A Good Match is Hard to Find.Daniel Algom - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):188-189.
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  • Memory Metaphors and the Real-Life/Laboratory Controversy: Correspondence Versus Storehouse Conceptions of Memory.Asher Koriat & Morris Goldsmith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):167-188.
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  • Consciousness, Non-Conscious Experiences and Functions, Proto-Experiences and Proto-Functions, and Subjective Experiences.Ram L. P. Vimal - 2010 - Journal of Consciousness Exploration and Research 1 (3):383-389.
    A general definition of consciousness that accommodates most views (Vimal, 2010b) is: “ ‘consciousness is a mental aspect of a system or a process, which is a conscious experience, a conscious function, or both depending on the context and particular bias (e.g. metaphysical assumptions)’, where experiences can be conscious experiences and/or non-conscious experiences and functions can be conscious functions and/or non-conscious functions that include qualities of objects. These are a posteriori definitions because they are based on observations and the categorization.” (...)
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  • Recherches Structurales En Mythologie aux États-Unis.Pierre Maranda - 1967 - Social Science Information 6 (5):213-219.
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  • Motility, Potentiality, and Infinity—A Semiotic Hypothesis on Nature and Religion.Massimo Leone - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):369-389.
    Against any obscurantist stand, denying the interest of natural sciences for the comprehension of human meaning and language, but also against any reductionist hypothesis, frustrating the specificity of the semiotic point of view on nature, the paper argues that the deepest dynamic at the basis of meaning consists in its being a mechanism of ‘potentiality navigation’ within a universe generally characterized by motility. On the one hand, such a hypothesis widens the sphere of meaning to all beings somehow endowed with (...)
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  • Neoanalysis and Beyond.Mark W. Edwards - 1990 - Classical Antiquity 9 (2):311-325.
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  • Introduction to Code Biology.Marcello Barbieri - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (2):167-179.
    The New World of the Organic CodesThe genetic code appeared on Earth at the origin of life, and the codes of culture arrived almost 4 billion years later, at the end of life’s history. Today it is widely assumed that these are the only codes that exist in Nature, and if this were true we would have to conclude that codes are extraordinary exceptions because they appeared only at the beginning and at the end of evolution. In reality, various other (...)
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  • The Beginnings of Expertise for Ballads.David C. Rubin, Wanda T. Wallace & Barbara C. Houston - 1993 - Cognitive Science 17 (3):435-462.
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  • Exploring the Literary Function of Law and Litigation in "Njal's Saga".Henry Ordower - 1991 - Cardozo Studies in Law and Literature 3 (1):41-61.
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  • Symbolic Action in the Homeric Hymns: The Theme of Recognition.John F. García - 2002 - Classical Antiquity 21 (1):5-39.
    The Homeric Hymns are commonly taken to be religious poems in some general sense but they are often said to contrast with cult hymns in that the latter have a definite ritual function, whereas "literary" hymns do not. This paper argues that despite the difficulty in establishing a precise occasion of performance for the Homeric Hymns, we are nevertheless in a position to identify their ritual function: by intoning a Hymn of this kind, the singer achieves the presence of a (...)
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