Switch to: References

Citations of:

Curiosity, Belief and Acquaintance

In Virtue Epistemology Naturalized. New York: Springer. pp. 143-157 (2014)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Curiosity and Ignorance.Ilhan Inan - 2016 - Croatian Journal of Philosophy 16 (3):285-303.
    Though ignorance is rarely a bliss, awareness of ignorance almost always is. Had we not been able to develop this powerful skill, there would have been no philosophy or science, nor advanced forms of religion, art, and technology. Awareness of ignorance, however, is not a motivator; but when it arouses curiosity that is strong enough, it causes what may be called an “epistemic” desire; a desire to know, to understand, to learn or to gain new experiences, which is a basic (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Epistemic repugnance four ways.Brian Talbot - forthcoming - Synthese:1-22.
    Value-based epistemology sees epistemic norms as explained by or grounded in distinctively epistemic values. This paper argues that, no matter what epistemic value is, credences or beliefs about some topics have at most infinitesimal amounts of this value. This makes it hard to explain why epistemic norms apply at all to credences or beliefs on these topics. My argument is inspired by a recent series of papers on epistemic versions of Parfit’s Repugnant Conclusion. The discussion in those papers parallels work (...)
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Headaches for Epistemologists.Brian Talbot - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark