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  1. Bad Apples: Feminist Politics and Feminist Scholarship.Alan Soble - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (3):354-388.
    Some exceptional and surprising mistakes of scholarship made in the writings of a number of feminist academics are examined in detail. This essay offers the psychological hypothesis that these mistakes were the result of political passion and concludes with some remarks about the ability of the social sciences to study the effect of the politics of the researcher on the quality of his or her research.
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  • 'New Age' Philosophies of Science: Constructivism, Feminism and Postmodernism.N. Koertge - 2000 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):667-683.
    This paper surveys three controversial new directions in research about the nature of science and briefly summarizes both the intellectual and sociological impact of this work. A bibliographic introduction to the major literature is provided and some fruitful directions for future research are proposed. Philosophers of science are also exhorted to perform 'community service' by correcting misunderstandings of the methods of science fostered by these new approaches.
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  • The Pragmatism of Knowledge: Quantum Mechanics.Tyler Rooker - 2001 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 21 (2):119-128.
    Quantum mechanics is certainly a strange place to start an investigation into the nature of the relationship between science and society. However, this article begins by integrating its history and proceeds through current conceptions of it by some physicists to examine quantum mechanics as an intersection of both science and knowledge. A famous thought experiment by Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen pointed to an area that few physicists still research–a paradigm gone awry. Yet the vast majority of physiciststoday do not agonize (...)
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  • Ambiguous Legacy: The Social Construction of the Kuhnian Revolution and Its Consequences for the Sociology of Science.Zaheer Baber - 2000 - Bulletin of Science, Technology and Society 20 (2):139-155.
    In this article, the impact of Thomas Kuhn’s The Structure of Scientific Revolutions on the sociology of science is evaluated. The main argument is that a questionable construction of Kuhn’s work heralded the constructivist revolution that ultimately contributed to the division between sociology of science and sociology of scientific knowledge. A reorientation of sociology of science that combines institutional and constructivist perspectives is advocated.
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  • Review of “Labyrinth: A Search for the Hidden Meaning of Science”. [REVIEW]Alexander Klein - 2002 - Essays in Philosophy 3 (1):11.
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  • Uma nova ciência para um novo mundo. – O projeto da Grande Restauração por meio de suas imagens.Manzo Silvia - 2015 - Revista Sképsis 8 (12).
    Os escritos de Francis Bacon dedicados à filosofia abundam em imagens, metáforas, comparações e alegorias destinadas a ilustrar e apresentar com eloquência suas ideias. Solidamente formado na cultura humanista de seu tempo, Bacon adotou com destreza os recursos da retórica e nutriu-se de um amplo espectro da literatura clássica greco-latina, assim como também dos escritos bíblicos. Em especial, a mitologia clássica (a que dedicou seu De sapientia veterum (1609) - Da sabedoria dos antigos) foi um de seus recursos predilteos na (...)
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  • Francis Bacon and the ‘Vexations of Art’: Experimentation as Intervention.Carolyn Merchant - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Science 46 (4):551-599.
    Francis Bacon's concept of the ‘vexations of art’ entailed experimentation as an intervention into nature for the purpose of extracting its secrets. Although the standard edition of Bacon's works by Spedding, Ellis and Heath and the new Oxford edition by Graham Rees translate the phrase vexationes artium as the ‘vexations of art’, a significant number of scholars, translators and editors from the seventeenth century to the present have read Bacon's Latin as the ‘torment’ or ‘tortures of art’. Here I discuss (...)
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