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  1. Interactive Semantic Alignment Model: Social Influence and Local Transmission Bottleneck.Dariusz Kalociński, Marcin Mostowski & Nina Gierasimczuk - 2018 - Journal of Logic, Language and Information 27 (3):225-253.
    We provide a computational model of semantic alignment among communicating agents constrained by social and cognitive pressures. We use our model to analyze the effects of social stratification and a local transmission bottleneck on the coordination of meaning in isolated dyads. The analysis suggests that the traditional approach to learning—understood as inferring prescribed meaning from observations—can be viewed as a special case of semantic alignment, manifesting itself in the behaviour of socially imbalanced dyads put under mild pressure of a local (...)
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  • Language, Thought, and Color: Whorf Was Half Right.Terry Regier & Paul Kay - 2009 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (10):439-446.
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  • Enactivism, Radical Enactivism and Predictive Processing: What is Radical in Cognitive Science?Robert W. Clowes & Klaus Gärtner - 2017 - Kairos 18 (1):54-83.
    According to Enactivism, cognition should be understood in terms of a dynamic interaction between an acting organism and its environment. Further, this view holds that organisms do not passively receive information from this environment, they rather selectively create this environment by engaging in interaction with the world. Radical Enactivism adds that basic cognition does so without entertaining representations and hence that representations are not an essential constituent of cognition. Some proponents think that getting rid of representations amounts to a revolutionary (...)
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  • Designing Meaningful Agents.Matthew Stone - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (5):781-809.
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  • Semantics and Computational Semantics.Matthew Stone - unknown
    Interdisciplinary investigations marry the methods and concerns of different fields. Computer science is the study of precise descriptions of finite processes; semantics is the study of meaning in language. Thus, computational semantics embraces any project that approaches the phenomenon of meaning by way of tasks that can be performed by following definite sets of mechanical instructions. So understood, computational semantics revels in applying semantics, by creating intelligent devices whose broader behavior fits the meanings of utterances, and not just their form. (...)
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  • Learning to Interpret Utterances Using Dialogue History.Matthew Stone - unknown
    We describe a methodology for learning a disambiguation model for deep pragmatic interpretations in the context of situated task-oriented dialogue. The system accumulates training examples for ambiguity resolution by tracking the fates of alternative interpretations across dialogue, including subsequent clarificatory episodes initiated by the system itself. We illustrate with a case study building maximum entropy models over abductive interpretations in a referential communication task. The resulting model correctly resolves 81% of ambiguities left unresolved by an initial handcrafted baseline. A key (...)
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  • Colour Categorization and Categorical Perception.Robert Briscoe - 2020 - In Derek Brown & Fiona Macpherson (eds.), Routledge Handbook of the Philosophy of Colour. Routledge. pp. 456-474.
    In this chapter, I critically examine two of the main approaches to colour categorization in cognitive science: the perceptual salience theory and linguistic relativism. I then turn to reviewing several decades of psychological research on colour categorical perception (CP). A careful assessment of relevant findings suggests that most of the experimental effects that have been understood in terms of CP actually fall on the cognition side of the perception-cognition divide: they are effects of colour language, for example, on memory or (...)
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  • Dynamisch Inter(-en trans)disciplinair Taal Onderzoek: De nieuwe taalwetenschappen.Nathalie Gontier & Katrien Mondt (eds.) - 2006 - Gent, België: Academia press, Ginkgo.
    Language research is currently in a state of flux. The phenomenon of language is not merely the topic of investigation in linguistics, it is examined by a multitude of scholars with different scientific backgrounds. In order to examine how these various disciplines approach language, a think-tank was founded in 2002, called DITO, Dynamisch Inter(-en trans)disciplinair onderzoek, or Dynamic Inter- (and trans)disciplinary Research. The think-tank is located at the Belgian Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Free University of Brussels). This book provides short introductory (...)
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  • Conventional Wisdom: Negotiating Conventions of Reference Enhances Category Learning.John Voiklis & James E. Corter - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (4):607-634.
    Collaborators generally coordinate their activities through communication, during which they readily negotiate a shared lexicon for activity-related objects. This social-pragmatic activity both recruits and affects cognitive and social-cognitive processes ranging from selective attention to perspective taking. We ask whether negotiating reference also facilitates category learning or might private verbalization yield comparable facilitation? Participants in three referential conditions learned to classify imaginary creatures according to combinations of functional features—nutritive and destructive—that implicitly defined four categories. Remote partners communicated in the Dialogue condition. (...)
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  • What Are Natural Concepts? A Design Perspective.Igor Douven & Peter Gärdenfors - 2019 - Mind and Language (3):313-334.
    Conceptual spaces have become an increasingly popular modeling tool in cognitive psychology. The core idea of the conceptual spaces approach is that concepts can be represented as regions in similarity spaces. While it is generally acknowledged that not every region in such a space represents a natural concept, it is still an open question what distinguishes those regions that represent natural concepts from those that do not. The central claim of this paper is that natural concepts are represented by the (...)
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  • Vagueness and Aggregation in Multiple Sender Channels.Jonathan Lawry & Oliver James - 2017 - Erkenntnis 82 (5):1123-1160.
    Vagueness is an extremely common feature of natural language, but does it actually play a positive, efficiency enhancing, role in communication? Adopting a probabilistic interpretation of vague terms, we propose that vagueness might act as a source of randomness when deciding what to assert. In this context we investigate the efficacy of multiple sender channels in which senders choose assertions stochastically according to vague definitions of the relevant words, and a receiver then aggregates the different signals. These vague channels are (...)
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  • The End of Development.Sergio Balari & Guillermo Lorenzo - 2015 - Biological Theory 10 (1):60-72.
    Recently, there has been a growing interest, both within theoretical biology and the philosophy of biology, in the possibility and desirability of a theory of development. Among the many issues raised within this debate, the questions of the spatial and temporal boundaries of development have received particular attention. In this article, noting that so far the discussion has mostly centered on the processes of morphogenesis and organogenesis, we argue that an important missing element in the equation, namely the development of (...)
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  • Subfocal Color Categorization and Naming: The Role of Exposure to Language and Professional Experience.Maciej Haman & Monika Malinowska - 2009 - Polish Psychological Bulletin 40 (4):170-175.
    Subfocal Color Categorization and Naming: The Role of Exposure to Language and Professional Experience The current state of the debate on the linguistic factors in color perception and categorization is reviewed. Developmental and learning studies were hitherto almost ignored in this debate. A simple experiment is reported in which 20 Academy of Fine Arts, Faculty of Painting students' performance in color discrimination and naming tasks was compared to the performance of 20 Technical University students. Subfocal colors were used. While there (...)
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  • Embodiment Versus Memetics.Joanna J. Bryson - 2007 - Mind and Society 7 (1):77-94.
    The term embodiment identifies a theory that meaning and semantics cannot be captured by abstract, logical systems, but are dependent on an agent’s experience derived from being situated in an environment. This theory has recently received a great deal of support in the cognitive science literature and is having significant impact in artificial intelligence. Memetics refers to the theory that knowledge and ideas can evolve more or less independently of their human-agent substrates. While humans provide the medium for this evolution, (...)
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  • Misconceptions About Colour Categories.Christoph Witzel - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (3):499-540.
    The origin of colour categories and their relationship to colour perception have been the prime example for testing the influence of language on perception and thought and more generally for investigating the biological, ecological and cultural determination of human cognition. These themes are central to a broad range of disciplines, including vision research, neuroscience, cognitive psychology, developmental science, cultural anthropology, linguistics, computer science, and philosophy. Unfortunately, though, it has been tacitly taken for granted that the conceptual assumptions and methodological practices (...)
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  • Towards More Realistic Modeling of Linguistic Color Categorization.Radek Ocelák & José Pedro Correia - 2019 - Open Philosophy 2 (1):160-189.
    The ways in which languages have come to divide the visible spectrum with their color terminology, in both their variety and the apparent universal tendencies, are still largely unexplained. Building on recent work in modeling color perception and categorization, as well as the theory of signaling games, we incrementally construct a color categorization model which combines perceptual characteristics of individual agents, game-theoretic signaling interaction of these agents, and the probability of observing particular colors as an environmental constraint. We also propose (...)
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  • An Alternative to Mapping a Word Onto a Concept in Language Acquisition: Pragmatic Frames.Katharina J. Rohlfing, Britta Wrede, Anna-Lisa Vollmer & Pierre-Yves Oudeyer - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • The Role of Language in Emotion: Predictions From Psychological Constructionism.Kristen A. Lindquist, Jennifer K. MacCormack & Holly Shablack - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Influence of Perceptual Saliency Hierarchy on Learning of Language Structures: An Artificial Language Learning Experiment.Tao Gong, Yau W. Lam & Lan Shuai - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Grounding as a Side‐Effect of Grounding.Staffan Larsson - 2018 - Topics in Cognitive Science 10 (2):389-408.
    In relation to semantics, “grounding” has two relevant meanings. “Symbol grounding” is the process of connecting symbols to perception and the world. “Communicative grounding” is the process of interactively adding to common ground in dialog. Strategies for grounding in human communication include, crucially, strategies for resolving troubles caused by various kinds of miscommunication. As it happens, these two processes of grounding are closely related. As a side-effect of grounding an utterance, dialog participants may adjust the meanings they assign to linguistic (...)
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  • Modeling the Emergence of Language as an Embodied Collective Cognitive Activity.Edwin Hutchins & Christine M. Johnson - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):523-546.
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  • Explaining Color Term Typology With an Evolutionary Model.Mike Dowman - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (1):99-132.
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  • Coevolution of Lexical Meaning and Pragmatic Use.Thomas Brochhagen, Michael Franke & Robert van Rooij - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (8):2757-2789.
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  • Finding Categories Through Words: More Nameable Features Improve Category Learning.Martin Zettersten & Gary Lupyan - 2020 - Cognition 196:104135.
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  • Editorial: Sensory Categories.Yasmina Jraissati - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (3):419-439.
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  • The Myth of Language Universals: Language Diversity and its Importance for Cognitive Science.Nicholas Evans & Stephen C. Levinson - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):429-448.
    Talk of linguistic universals has given cognitive scientists the impression that languages are all built to a common pattern. In fact, there are vanishingly few universals of language in the direct sense that all languages exhibit them. Instead, diversity can be found at almost every level of linguistic organization. This fundamentally changes the object of enquiry from a cognitive science perspective. This target article summarizes decades of cross-linguistic work by typologists and descriptive linguists, showing just how few and unprofound the (...)
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  • Towards a Vygotskyan Cognitive Robotics: The Role of Language as a Cognitive Tool.Marco Mirolli - 2011 - New Ideas in Psychology 29:298-311.
    Cognitive Robotics can be defined as the study of cognitive phenomena by their modeling in physical artifacts such as robots. This is a very lively and fascinating field which has already given fundamental contributions to our understanding of natural cognition. Nonetheless, robotics has to date addressed mainly very basic, low­level cognitive phenomena like sensory­motor coordination, perception, and navigation, and it is not clear how the current approach might scale up to explain high­level human cognition. In this paper we argue that (...)
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  • With Diversity in Mind: Freeing the Language Sciences From Universal Grammar.Nicholas Evans & Stephen C. Levinson - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):472-492.
    Our response takes advantage of the wide-ranging commentary to clarify some aspects of our original proposal and augment others. We argue against the generative critics of our coevolutionary program for the language sciences, defend the use of close-to-surface models as minimizing cross-linguistic data distortion, and stress the growing role of stochastic simulations in making generalized historical accounts testable. These methods lead the search for general principles away from idealized representations and towards selective processes. Putting cultural evolution central in understanding language (...)
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  • Basic Tastes and Basic Emotions: Basic Problems and Perspectives for a Nonbasic Solution.David Sander - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):88-88.
    Contemporary behavioral and brain scientists consider the existence of so-called basic emotions in a similar way to the one described by Erickson for so-called basic tastes. Commenting on this analogy, I argue that similar basic problems are encountered in both perspectives, and I suggest a potential nonbasic solution that is tested in emotion research (i.e., the appraisal model of emotion).
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  • A Study of the Science of Taste: On the Origins and Influence of the Core Ideas.Robert P. Erickson - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):59-75.
    Our understanding of the sense of taste is largely based on research designed and interpreted in terms of the traditional four tastes: sweet, sour, salty, and bitter, and now a few more. This concept of basic tastes has no rational definition to test, and thus it has not been tested. As a demonstration, a preliminary attempt to test one common but arbitrary psychophysical definition of basic tastes is included in this article; that the basic tastes are unique in being able (...)
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  • Commentary/Evans & Levinson: The Myth of Language Universals.Derek C. Penn, Keith J. Holyoak & Daniel J. Povinellia - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5).
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  • The Symbol Grounding Problem has Been Solved. So What's Next.Luc Steels - 2008 - In Manuel de Vega, Arthur Glenberg & Arthur Graesser (eds.), Symbols and Embodiment: Debates on Meaning and Cognition. Oxford University Press. pp. 223--244.
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  • How Similar Are Fluid Cognition and General Intelligence? A Developmental Neuroscience Perspective on Fluid Cognition as an Aspect of Human Cognitive Ability.Blair Clancy - 2006 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (2):109-125.
    This target article considers the relation of fluid cognitive functioning to general intelligence. A neurobiological model differentiating working memory/executive function cognitive processes of the prefrontal cortex from aspects of psychometrically defined general intelligence is presented. Work examining the rise in mean intelligence-test performance between normative cohorts, the neuropsychology and neuroscience of cognitive function in typically and atypically developing human populations, and stress, brain development, and corticolimbic connectivity in human and nonhuman animal models is reviewed and found to provide evidence of (...)
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  • Talking Nets: A Multiagent Connectionist Approach to Communication and Trust Between Individuals.Frank Van Overwalle & Francis Heylighen - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (3):606-627.
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  • 'Honest Fakes' and Language Origins.Chris Knight - 2008 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (10-11):236-248.
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  • Semantic and Perceptual Representations of Color: Evidence of a Shared Color-Naming Function.Bilge Sayim, Kimberly A. Jameson, Nancy Alvarado & Monika Szeszel - 2005 - Journal of Cognition and Culture 5 (3-4):427-486.
    Much research on color representation and categorization has assumed that relations among color terms can be proxies for relations among color percepts. We test this assumption by comparing the mapping of color words with color appearances among different observer groups performing cognitive tasks: an invariance of naming task; and triad similarity judgments of color term and color appearance stimuli within and across color categories. Observer subgroups were defined by perceptual phenotype and photopigment opsin genotype analyses. Results suggest that individuals rely (...)
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  • Conversation, Cognition and Cultural Evolution.Seán G. Roberts & Stephen C. Levinson - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (3):402-442.
    This paper outlines a first attempt to model the special constraints that arise in language processing in conversation, and to explore the implications such functional considerations may have on language typology and language change. In particular, we focus on processing pressures imposed by conversational turn-taking and their consequences for the cultural evolution of the structural properties of language. We present an agent-based model of cultural evolution where agents take turns at talk in conversation. When the start of planning for the (...)
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  • Explaining Color Term Typology With an Evolutionary Model.Mike Dowman - 2007 - Cognitive Science: A Multidisciplinary Journal 30 (1):99-132.
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  • Explaining Color Term Typology With an Evolutionary Model.Mike Dowman - 2007 - Cognitive Science 31 (1):99-132.
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  • Naturalizing Language: Human Appraisal and (Quasi) Technology.Stephen J. Cowley - 2013 - AI and Society 28 (4):443-453.
    Using contemporary science, the paper builds on Wittgenstein’s views of human language. Rather than ascribing reality to inscription-like entities, it links embodiment with distributed cognition. The verbal or (quasi) technological aspect of language is traced to not action, but human specific interactivity. This species-specific form of sense-making sustains, among other things, using texts, making/construing phonetic gestures and thinking. Human action is thus grounded in appraisals or sense-saturated coordination. To illustrate interactivity at work, the paper focuses on a case study. Over (...)
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  • Does Optimal Partitioning Account for Universal Color Categorization?Yasmina Jraissati & Igor Douven - 2017 - PLoS ONE 12.
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  • Insights From the Colour Category Controversy.Tony Belpaeme - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):75-76.
    There are striking parallels between the basic tastes debate and the debate on human colour categorisation. Colour categories show a remarkable cross-cultural similarity, but at the same the time exhibit seemingly inexplicable large interpersonal variations. Recent results suggest that colour categories are the result of cultural learning constrained by the neural substrate of colour perception.
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  • Societal Grounding is Essential to Meaningful Language Use.Matthew Stone - unknown
    well-known arguments dispute the meaningfulness of language use in specific extant systems; the symbols they use..
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  • “Categorical Perception” and Linguistic Categorization of Color.Radek Ocelák - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (1):55-70.
    This paper offers a conceptual clarification of the phenomenon commonly referred to as categorical perception of color, both in adults and in infants. First, I argue against the common notion of categorical perception as involving a distortion of the perceptual color space. The effects observed in the categorical perception research concern categorical discrimination performance and the underlying processing; they need not directly reflect the relations of color similarity and difference. Moreover, the methodology of the research actually presupposes that the relations (...)
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  • Cognition From the Bottom Up: On Biological Inspiration, Body Morphology, and Soft Materials.Rolf Pfeifer, Fumiya Iida & Max Lungarella - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (8):404-413.
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