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Left-Libertarianism and Liberty

In Thomas Christiano & John Christman (eds.), Debates in Political Philosophy. Blackwell. pp. 17--137 (2009)

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  1. The Slap Argument Inclines the Freedom of Religion.Pouya Lotfi Yazdi - manuscript
    I (hereafter: the writer) argue that, first of all, the freedom of religion and some standards of freedom of religion (hereafter: SFR) is absolute. In addition, different concepts of God do not change SFR, and this claim proves that revises of God's ideas do not lean toward of restructuring of SFR. These two claims have been presented by an argument that the writer calls the slap argument. Last but not least, the slap argument shows that theocracy suffers from these delighted (...)
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  • Libertarianism, Climate Change, and Individual Responsibility.Olle Torpman - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-24.
    Much has been written about climate change from an ethical view in general, but less has been written about it from a libertarian point of view in particular. In this paper, I apply the libertarian moral theory to the problem of climate change. I focus on libertarianism’s implications for our individual emissions. I argue that even if our individual emissions cause no harm to others, these emissions cross other people’s boundaries, although the boundary-crossings that are due to our ‘subsistence emissions’ (...)
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  • The Samaritan State and Social Welfare Provision.Steven Wulf - 2018 - Res Publica 24 (2):217-236.
    Christopher Wellman and some allied scholars argue that a ‘samaritan theory’ can justify state coercion. They also suppose that states may provide robust, social egalitarian welfare provisions for a variety of reasons that would arise within samaritan states. However, the most promising reasons—samaritanism itself, natural socialism, relational equality, and anti-crime paternalism—cannot support robust provision without discarding the strong presumption favoring individual liberty which must motivate the samaritan theory. Consequently, a samaritan state cannot be a robust social welfare state.
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  • Libertarianism and Climate Change.Olle Torpman - 2016 - Dissertation, Stockholm University
    In this dissertation, I investigate the implications of libertarian morality in relation to the problem of climate change. This problem is explicated in the first chapter, where preliminary clarifications are also made. In the second chapter, I briefly explain the characteristics of libertarianism relevant to the subsequent study, including the central non-aggression principle. In chapter three, I examine whether our individual emissions of greenhouse gases, which together give rise to climate change, meet this principle. I do this based on the (...)
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  • Self-Ownership, the Conflation Problem, and Presumptive Libertarianism: Can the Market Model Support Libertarianism Rather Than the Other Way Around?Marcus Agnafors - 2015 - Libertarian Papers 7.
    David Sobel has recently argued that libertarian theories that accept full and strict self-ownership as foundational confront what he calls the conflation problem: if transgressing self-ownership is strictly and stringently forbidden, it is implied that the normative protection against one infringement is precisely as strong as against any other infringement. But this seems to be an absurd consequence. In defense of libertarianism, I argue that the conflation problem can be handled in a way that allows us to honor basic libertarian (...)
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  • La liberté des Modernes à l’épreuve de la finitude.Augustin Fragnière - 2012 - Natures Sciences Sociétés 20 (2):192-200.
    Les problèmes environnementaux et les réponses qui pourraient leur être apportées font-ils peser une menace nouvelle sur la liberté individuelle ? La question mérite d’être posée à l’heure où l’on prend de plus en plus conscience des limites de la planète, tant au niveau des ressources que de la capacité de charge des écosystèmes. La conception moderne de la liberté, telle que définie par le projet libéral, est faite d’indépendance, de « jouissance paisible » et de droit à la poursuite (...)
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