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  1. Populist Mobilization: A New Theoretical Approach to Populism.Robert S. Jansen - 2011 - Sociological Theory 29 (2):75-96.
    Sociology has long shied away from the problem of populism. This may be due to suspicion about the concept or uncertainty about how to fit populist cases into broader comparative matrices. Such caution is warranted: the existing interdisciplinary literature has been plagued by conceptual confusion and disagreement. But given the recent resurgence of populist politics in Latin America and elsewhere, sociology can no longer afford to sidestep such analytical challenges. This article moves toward a political sociology of populism by identifying (...)
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  • ʻHow Bourgeois Were the Bourgeois Revolutions?ʼ.Heide Gerstenberger - 2019 - Historical Materialism 27 (3):191-209.
    While the overview concerning debates on bourgeois revolutions is impressive, it cannot elucidate the theoretical concept of bourgeois revolutions. Neil Davidson’s own suggestion centres on the removal of hindrances to the breakthrough of capitalism, especially the pre-capitalist state. This formalistic definition is based on the assumption that revolutions occurred when the superstructure became a hindrance to the further development of productive forces. It deprives the theoretical concept of bourgeois revolutions of any concrete historical content. This paper suggests restricting the use (...)
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  • To Rely or Not to Rely on Common Sense? Introducing Critical Realism's Insights to Social Network Analysis.Sourabh Singh - 2020 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 50 (2):203-222.
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  • Determinism and the Antiquated Deontology of the Social Sciences.Clint Ballinger - unknown
    This article shows how the social sciences rejected hard determinism by the mid-twentieth century largely on the deontological basis that it is irreconcilable with social justice, yet this rejection came just before a burst of creative development in consequentialist theories of social justice that problematize a facile rejection of determinism on moral grounds, a development that has seldom been recognized in the social sciences. Thus the current social science view of determinism and social justice is antiquated, ignoring numerous common and (...)
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  • Insecurity, Citizenship, and Globalization: The Multiple Faces of State Protection.Daniel Béland - 2005 - Sociological Theory 23 (1):25-41.
    Adopting a long-term historical perspective, this article examines the growing complexity and the internal tensions of state protection in Western Europe and North America. Beginning with Charles Tilly's theory about state building and organized crime, the discussion follows with a critical analysis of T. H. Marshall's article on citizenship. Arguing that state protection has become far more multifaceted than what Marshall's triadic model suggests, the article shows how this protection frequently transcends the logic of individual rights while increasing the reliance (...)
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  • Historical-Institutionalism in Political Science and the Problem of Change.Ellen M. Immergut - 2006 - In Andreas Wimmer & Reinhart Kössler (eds.), Understanding Change: Models, Methodologies, and Metaphors. Palgrave-Macmillan.
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  • Long-Range Continuities in Comparative and Historical Sociology: The Case of Parasitism and Women’s Enslavement.Fiona Greenland - 2019 - Theory and Society 48 (6):883-902.
    In this methods-building article, I show how attention to long-term continuities in female enslavement patterns helps us understand the emergence of the Black Atlantic. Slavery, I argue, is one form of human parasitism. I extend Orlando Patterson’s theory of human parasitism to examine the phenomenon of parasitic intertwining, wherein the forced labor of women became integral to broader social projects including household functioning, elite status maintenance, and population expansion. The thousand-year period between the fall of Rome and the rise of (...)
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  • Religion, Society and Gendered-Politics in Central Asia: A Comparative Analysis.M. Moniruzzaman & Kazi Fahmida Farzana - 2019 - Intellectual Discourse 27 (S I #1):745-766.
    Women political participation is understood to be a part of civic rightsbut their participation is hindered by various factors. Numerous researchershave claimed that Islam as a religion, Muslim social culture and traditioninhibit women from political participation in Muslim societies. However, thereare a number of Muslim majority countries where women occupy the highestpublic offices and head ministries. How can this contradiction be explained.This article examines women political participation in Central Asian Muslimrepublics by looking at socioeconomic, parliamentary representation andinformal participation factors. The (...)
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  • Comparative Process Tracing.Hannu Ruonavaara & Bo Bengtsson - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (1):44-66.
    This article introduces comparative process tracing as a two-step methodological approach that combines theory, chronology, and comparison. For each studied case, the processes leading “from A to B” are reconstructed and analyzed in terms of ideal-type social mechanisms and then compared by making use of the identified mechanisms and ideal-type periodization. Central elements of CPT are path dependence, critical junctures and focal points, social mechanisms, context, periodization, and counterfactual analysis. The CPT approach is described, discussed, and compared with more formal (...)
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  • Book Review: Hegel’s Philosophy – Ethics, Recognition and oppressionJamesDavid, Hegel – A Guide for the Perplexed , Vi + 164 Pp., Index.SpeightAllen, The Philosophy of Hegel , Viii + 166 Pp., Index.PippinRobert B., Hegel’s Practical Philosophy – Rational Agency as Ethical Life , Xi + 308 Pp., Index.AndersonSybol S. C., Hegel’s Theory of Recognition – From Oppression to Ethical Liberal Modernity , 224 Pp., Index. [REVIEW]Thomas Klikauer - 2012 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 38 (6):651-658.
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  • From Post-Communism to Civil Society: The Reemergence of History and the Decline of the Western Model.John Gray - 1993 - Social Philosophy and Policy 10 (2):26-50.
    For virtually all the major schools of Western opinion, the collapse of the Communist regimes in Eastern Europe and in the Soviet Union, between 1989 and 1991, represents a triumph of Western values, ideas, and institutions. If, for triumphal conservatives, the events of late 1989 encompassed an endorsement of “democratic capitalism” that augured “the end of history,” for liberal and social democrats they could be understood as the repudiation by the peoples of the former Soviet bloc of Marxism-Leninism in all (...)
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  • Intruding on Barrington Moore's Privacy: A Review Essay.Norman Stockman - 1989 - Theory, Culture and Society 6 (1):125-144.
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  • “Does Democracy End in Terror?” Transformations of Antitotalitarianism in Postwar France.Kevin Duong - 2017 - Modern Intellectual History 14 (2):537-563.
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  • What Is Relational Structure? Introducing History to the Debates on the Relation Between Fields and Social Networks.Sourabh Singh - 2016 - Sociological Theory 34 (2):128-150.
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  • The Hitler Swarm.Dirk Baecker - 2013 - Thesis Eleven 117 (1):68-88.
    Explaining the seizure of power by the National Socialist Party and the totalitarian workings of the Nazi regime in the Third Reich is still difficult not only with respect to the atrocities committed but also to understanding whether the German population and society had to be terrorized into complying with the regime or were part and parcel of it. The paper introduces a notion of swarm to advance the idea that the German population was terrorized into a deliberate compliance with (...)
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