Man's Responsibility for Nature: Ecological Problems and Western Traditions

London: Gerald Duckworth & Co., Ltd., (1974)
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Abstract
_Man's Responsibility for Nature_ is a book by John Passmore, a presumably able-bodied, presumably heterosexual, presumably a male white settler Australian philosopher, and his conception of Western history's ideas about human's (white man's) relationship to nature [not with] (predominately looking at USA, that is, colonial Turtle Island) and their (white man's, not white woman's unless you think white men can talk for the universal us?) place in it. Part 1 talks about the evolution of this conception beginning with the idea that "Man is Despot", that is, relates to nature as if nature is another subject for use and exploitation. This self conception of man as the master of the world, demands he must dominate as manliness, as prescribed by Western religions. Chapter two considers changes to this man is despot conception, through expounding USA hegemonic luminaries who influence thoughts and decisions about the use, conservation, and exploitation of nature, as the beginnings of "Stewardship and Co-operation with nature", such as restricting the pillage of Turtle Island (North America) and for example establishing national parks, and the Sierra Club etc. Part Two describes four ecological problems as Passmore sees it: Pollution; Conservation; Preservation; Multiplication. i might continue when i've finished reading. :) But, in the meantime Part 3 reconsiders The Traditions, that is, Man as Despot, or Stewards to end with a final Chapter called Removing the Rubbish. Hmmm, curious?
Keywords
Reprint years
1974
ISBN(s)
9780684138152   0684138158   0715607561
PhilPapers/Archive ID
PASMRF
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Archival date: 2022-05-22
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