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The Feminist Art Project (TFAP) and its Significance for Aesthetics

In Feminist Aesthetics and Philosophy of Art: Critical Visions, Creative Engagements. Springer Press (forthcoming)

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  1. Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?Linda Nochlin - 1971 - ARTnews.
    In the field of art history, the white Western male viewpoint, unconsciously accepted as the viewpoint of the art historian, may—and does—prove to be inadequate not merely on moral and ethical grounds, or because it is elitist, but on purely intellectual ones. In revealing the failure of much academic art history, and a great deal of history in general, to take account of the unacknowledged value system, the very presence of an intruding subject in historical investigation, the feminist critique at (...)
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  • Feminist Aesthetics and the Neglect of Natural Beauty.Sheila Lintott - 2010 - Environmental Values 19 (3):315 - 333.
    Feminist philosophy has taken too long to engage seriously with aesthetics and has been even slower in confronting natural beauty in particular. There are various possible reasons for this neglect, including the relative youth of feminist aesthetics, the possibility that feminist philosophy is not relevant to nature aesthetics, the claim that natural beauty is not a serious topic, hesitation among feminists to perpetuate women's associations with beauty and nature, and that the neglect may be merely apparent. Discussing each of these (...)
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  • The artworld.Arthur Danto - 2012 - Problemos 82:184-193.
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  • Jenny Saville Remakes the Female Nude – Feminist Reflections on the State of the Art.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2012 - In Peg Brand (ed.), Beauty Unlimited. Indiana University Press.
    Jenny Saville is a leading contemporary painter of female nudes. This paper explores her work in light of theories of gender and embodied agency. Recent work on the phenomenology of embodiment draws a distinction between the body image and the body schema. The body image is your representation of your own body, including your visual image of it and your emotional attitudes towards it. The body schema is comprised of your proprioceptive knowledge, your corporeally encoded memories, and your corporeal proficiency (...)
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