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  1. Donald Davidson.Ernest Lepore & Kirk Ludwig - 2004 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 28 (1):309–333.
    This chapter reviews the major contributions of Donald Davidson to philosophy in the 20th century.
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  • Capacidades conceituais na percepção.John Mcdowell - 2006 - Dois Pontos 3 (1).
    resumo Um empirismo conseqüente depende da atribuição de um significado racional à nossa experiência perceptiva. Sem isto, a experiência perceptiva fica segregada do universo das crenças. Por outro lado, a experiência perceptiva não pode ser tratada como se fosse uma criação nossa. Ela deve ser vista como uma contribuição vinda de fora, que chega até nós através de nossos órgãos sensíveis. Estas duas exigências podem ser cumpridas desde que concebamos a experiência como a realização de capacidades conceituais na própria consciência (...)
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  • Truth and Probability.F. P. Ramsey - 1926 - In Antony Eagle (ed.), Philosophy of Probability: Contemporary Readings. Routledge. pp. 52-94.
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  • Two Dogmas of Empiricism.Willard Van Orman Quine - 1951 - Sententiae 33 (2):9-26.
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  • The Conditions of Thought.Donald Davidson - 1989 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 36 (1):193-200.
    This summary paper explains why we are not constrained to start from a solipsistic, or first person point of view in considering the nature of thought. My aim here is to suggest the nature of an acceptable extemalism. According to this view, knowledge of other minds need not be a problem m addition to the problem of empirical knowledge. The essential step toward determining the content of someone else's thought is made by discovering what normally causes those thoughts. Hence I (...)
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  • What is Present to the Mind?Donald Davidson - 1989 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 36 (1):3-18.
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  • One Strand in the Private Language Argument.John McDowell - 1989 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 33 (1):285-303.
    In reflecting about experience, philosophers are prone to fall into a dualism of conceptual scheme and pre-conceptual given, according to which the most basic judgments of experience are grounded in non-conceptual impingements on subjects of experience. This idea is dubiously coherent: relations of grounding or justification should hold between conceptually structured items. This thought has been widely applied to 'outer' experience; at least some of the Private Language Argument can be read as applying it to 'inner' experience. In this light, (...)
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  • Empirical Content.Donald Davidson - 1982 - Grazer Philosophische Studien 16:471-489.
    The dispute between Schlick and Neurath over het foundations of empirical knowledge illustrates the difficulties m trymg to draw epistemological conclusions from a verificationist theory of meaning. It also shows how assummg the general correctness of science does not automatically avoid, or provide an easy answer to, skepticism. But while neither Schlick nor Neurath arrived at a satisfactory account of empüical knowledge, there are promising hmts of a better theory m their writmgs. Following up these hints, and drawing on further (...)
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  • Place and Experience: A Philosophical Topography.Jeff E. Malpas - 1999 - Mind 110 (439):789-792.
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  • Philosophy and the Mirror of Nature.Richard Rorty - 1979 - Philosophical Review 90 (3):424-429.
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  • Donald Davidson.Simon EVNINE - 1991 - Philosophical Quarterly 43 (173):555-560.
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  • Mind and World.Huw Price & John McDowell - 1994 - Philosophical Books 38 (3):169-181.
    How do rational minds make contact with the world? The empiricist tradition sees a gap between mind and world, and takes sensory experience, fallible as it is, to provide our only bridge across that gap. In its crudest form, for example, the traditional idea is that our minds consult an inner realm of sensory experience, which provides us with evidence about the nature of external reality. Notoriously, however, it turns out to be far from clear that there is any viable (...)
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  • Wittgenstein on Rules and Private Language.Saul Kripke - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 51 (1):163-171.
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  • The Bounds of Sense: An Essay on Kant's Critique of Pure Reason.P. F. Strawson - 1966 - Philosophical Quarterly 18 (70):84-86.
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  • Semantics of Natural Language.Donald Davidson & Gilbert Harman - 1970 - Synthese 22 (1-2):1-2.
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  • Word and Object.Willard Van Orman Quine - 1960 - Les Etudes Philosophiques 17 (2):278-279.
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  • Sense and Sensibilia.J. L. AUSTIN - 1962 - Foundations of Language 3 (3):303-310.
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  • Causation in the Law.H. L. A. HART - 1959 - Philosophy 37 (139):83-84.
    An updated and extended second edition supporting the findings of its well-known predecessor which claimed that courts employ common-sense notions of causation in determining legal responsibility.
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  • Knowledge and the Internal.John McDowell - 1995 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 55 (4):877-93.
    1. I am going to work with an idea from Sellars, that knowledge—at least as enjoyed by rational animals—is a certain sort of standing in the space of reasons. My concern is a familiar philosophical dialectic, which I shall approach in terms of what happens to the Sellarsian idea when the image of standings in the space of reasons undergoes a certain deformation. That it is a deformation is something we can learn from how unsatisfactory the familiar dialectic is.
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  • Perception and Reason.Bill Brewer - 1999 - Mind 110 (439):725-729.
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  • Actions, Reasons, and Causes.Donald Davidson - 1963 - Journal of Philosophy 60 (23):685.
    What is the relation between a reason and an action when the reason explains the action by giving the agent's reason for doing what he did? We may call such explanations rationalizations, and say that the reason rationalizes the action. In this paper I want to defend the ancient - and common-sense - position that rationalization is a species of ordinary causal explanation. The defense no doubt requires some redeployment, but not more or less complete abandonment of the position, as (...)
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  • The Emergence of Thought.Donald Davidson - 1999 - Erkenntnis 51 (1):511-521.
    A phenomenon “emerges” when a concept is instantiated for the first time: hence emergence is relative to a set of concepts. Propositional thought and language emerge together. It is proposed that the degree of complexity of an object language relative to a given metalanguage can be gauged by the number of ways it can be translated into that metalanguage: in analogy with other forms of measurement, the more ways the object language can be translated into the metalanguage, the less powerful (...)
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  • Introduction.Donald Davidson - 2005 - In Truth and Predication. Harvard University Press. pp. 1-6.
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  • Science and Metaphysics: Variations on Kantian Themes: PHILOSOPHY.Wilfred Sellars - 1970 - Philosophy 45 (171):66-70.
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  • Kant's Transcendental Idealism: An Interpretation and Defence.Eckart Forster & Henry E. Allison - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (12):734.
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  • Mental Events.Donald Davidson - 1970 - In L. Foster & J. W. Swanson (eds.), Essays on Actions and Events. Clarendon Press. pp. 207-224.
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  • Response to McDowell.Hubert L. Dreyfus - 2007 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 50 (4):371 – 377.
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  • A Coherence Theory of Truth and Knowledge.Donald Davidson - 1986 - In Ernest LePore (ed.), Truth and Interpretation. Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Blackwell. pp. 307-319.
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  • Thought and Talk.Donald Davidson - 1975 - In Samuel D. Guttenplan (ed.), Mind and Language. Clarendon Press. pp. 1975--7.
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  • Pragmatism, Davidson and Truth.Richard Rorty - 1986 - In Ernest LePore (ed.), Truth and Interpretation: Perspectives on the Philosophy of Donald Davidson. Cambridge: Blackwell. pp. 354.
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  • Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind.Wilfrid S. Sellars - 1956 - Minnesota Studies in the Philosophy of Science 1:253-329.
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  • Pode Deus determinar o valor de pi? (Ou, pensar na objetividade depois de Hegel e Wittgenstein).Hilan Bensusan - 2007 - Kriterion: Journal of Philosophy 48 (115):47-66.
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  • Wittgenstein on Following a Rule.John McDowell - 1984 - Synthese 58 (March):325-364.
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  • Three Varieties of Knowledge.Donald Davidson - 1991 - In A. Phillips Griffiths (ed.), Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 153-166.
    I know, for the most part, what I think, want, and intend, and what my sensations are. In addition, I know a great deal about the world around me. I also sometimes know what goes on in other people's minds. Each of these three kinds of empirical knowledge has its distinctive characteristics. What I know about the contents of my own mind I generally know without investigation or appeal to evidence. There are exceptions, but the primacy of unmediated self-knowledge is (...)
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  • Thinking Causes.Donald Davidson - 1992 - In John Heil & Alfred R. Mele (eds.), Mental Causation. Oxford University Press. pp. 1993--3.
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  • Paradoxes of Irrationality.Donald Davidson - 1982 - In Problems of Rationality. Oxford University Press.
    The author believes that large‐scale rationality on the part of the interpretant is essential to his interpretability, and therefore, in his view, to her having a mind. How, then are cases of irrationality, such as akrasia or self‐deception, judged by the interpretant's own standards, possible? He proposes that, in order to resolve the apparent paradoxes, one must distinguish between accepting a contradictory proposition and accepting separately each of two contradictory propositions, which are held apart, which in turn requires to conceive (...)
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  • Who is Fooled?Donald Davidson - 2004 - In Problems of Rationality. Oxford University Press.
    Applies and extends the conclusions of the preceding chapters by examining cases of self‐deception of a puzzling sort emerging from cases of fantasizing and imagining, found in Joyce's Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Flaubert's Madame Bovary. The author is particularly interested in what can be described as the ‘divided mind of self‐deception’, the mind that produces an imagination due to its realising the state of the world that motivates the fantasy construct and the possessor's eventual acquisition (...)
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  • On the Sense and Reference of a Proper Name.John McDowell - 1977 - Mind 86 (342):159-185.
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  • Truth and Meaning.Donald Davidson - 1967 - Synthese 17 (1):304-323.
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  • The Second Person.Donald Davidson - 1992 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 17 (1):255-267.
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  • Hempel on Explaining Action.Donald Davidson - 1976 - Erkenntnis 10 (3):239 - 253.
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  • Epistemology Externalized.Donald Davidson - 1991 - Dialectica 45 (2‐3):191-202.
    SummaryStarting with Descartes, epistemology has been almost entirely based on first person knowledge. We must begin, according to the usual story, with what is most certain: knowledge of our own sensations and thoughts. In one way or another we then progress, if we can, to knowledge of an objective external world. There is then the final, tenuous, step to knowledge of other minds.In this paper I argue for a total revision of this picture. All propositional thought, whether positive or skeptical, (...)
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  • Human Nature?Crispin Wright - 1996 - European Journal of Philosophy 4 (2):235-254.
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  • Meaning and Intentionality in Wittgenstein's Later Philosophy.John McDowell - 1992 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 17 (1):40-52.
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  • Varieties of Nature in Hegel and McDowell.Christoph Halbig - 2006 - European Journal of Philosophy 14 (2):222–241.
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  • Rational Animals.Donald Davidson - 1982 - Dialectica 36 (4):317-28.
    SummaryNeither an infant one week old nor a snail is a rational creature. If the infant survives long enough, he will probably become rational, while this is not true of the snail. If we like, we may say of the infant from the start that he is a rational creature because he will probably become rational if he survives, or because he belongs to a species with this capacity. Whichever way we talk, there remains the difference, with respect to rationality, (...)
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  • The Inscrutability of Reference.Donald Davidson - 1979 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 10 (2):7-19.
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  • Knowing One's Own Mind.Donald Davidson - 1987 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 60 (3):441-458.
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  • Belief and the Basis of Meaning.Donald Davidson - 1974 - Synthese 27 (July-August):309-323.
    A theory of radical interpretation gives the meanings of all sentences of a language, and can be verified by evidence available to someone who does not understand the language. Such evidence cannot include detailed information concerning the beliefs and intentions of speakers, and therefore the theory must simultaneously interpret the utterances of speakers and specify (some of) his beliefs. Analogies and connections with decision theory suggest the kind of theory that will serve for radical interpretation, and how permissible evidence can (...)
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  • On the Very Idea of a Conceptual Scheme.Donald Davidson - 1973 - Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 47:5-20.
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