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  1. Worldly Difference and Ecological Ethics: Iris Murdoch and Emmanuel Levinas.Mick Smith - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):23-41.
    The natural world’s myriad differences from human beings, and its apparent indifference to human purposes and ends, are often regarded as problems an environmental ethics must overcome. Perhaps, though, ecological ethics might instead be re-envisaged as a form of other-directed concern that responds to just this situation. That is, the recognition of worldly difference might actually be regarded as a precondition for, and opening on, any contemporary ethics, whether human or ecological. What is more, the task of ethics might be (...)
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  • Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 1 (3):229-243.
    As I write this, in November 1971, people are dying in East Bengal from lack of food, shelter, and medical caxc. The suffering and death that are occurring there now axe not inevitable, 1101; unavoidable in any fatalistic sense of the term. Constant poverty, a cyclone, and a civil war have turned at least nine million people into destitute refugees; nevertheless, it is not beyond Lhe capacity of the richer nations to give enough assistance to reduce any further suffering to (...)
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  • Value as Richness: Toward a Value Theory for the Expanded Naturalism in Environmental Ethics.Peter Miller - 1982 - Environmental Ethics 4 (2):101-114.
    There is a widespread conviction amongst nature lovers, environmental activists, and many writers on environmental ethics that the value of the natural world is not restricted to its utility to humankind, but contains an independent intrinsic worth as weIl. Most contemporary value theories, however, are psychologically based and thus ill-suited to characterize such natural intrinsic value. The theory of “value asrichness” presented in this paper attempts to articulate a plausible nonpsychological theory of value that accomodates environmentalist convictions as weIl as (...)
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  • Unnecessary Suffering.J. M. Dieterle - 2008 - Environmental Ethics 30 (1):51-67.
    The philosophical literature on the ethical treatment of animals is largely divided between two distinct kinds of approaches: (1) the rights-based approach; and (2) the utilitarian approach. A third approach to the debate is possible. The general moral principle “It is wrong to cause unnecessary pain or suffering” is sufficient to render many human activities involving nonhuman animals morally wrong, provided an appropriate account of unnecessary is developed to give the principle its force. The moral principle can be easily applied (...)
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  • Worldly (In)Difference and Ecological Ethics.Mick Smith - 2007 - Environmental Ethics 29 (1):23-41.
    The natural world’s myriad differences from human beings, and its apparent indifference to human purposes and ends, are often regarded as problems an environmental ethics must overcome. Perhaps, though, ecological ethics might instead be re-envisaged as a form of other-directed concern that responds to just this situation. That is, the recognition of worldly (in)difference might actually be regarded as a precondition for, and opening on, any contemporary ethics, whether human or ecological. What is more, the task of ethics might be (...)
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  • Famine, Affluence, and Morality.Peter Singer - 1972 - Oxford University Press USA.
    In 1972, the young philosopher Peter Singer published "Famine, Affluence and Morality," which rapidly became one of the most widely discussed essays in applied ethics. Through this article, Singer presents his view that we have the same moral obligations to those far away as we do to those close to us. He argued that choosing not to send life-saving money to starving people on the other side of the earth is the moral equivalent of neglecting to save drowning children because (...)
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  • Practical Ethics.Peter Singer - 1979 - Philosophy 56 (216):267-268.
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  • The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan & Mary Midgley - 1986 - The Personalist Forum 2 (1):67-71.
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  • Grounding for the Metaphysics of Morals: With on a Supposed Right to Lie Because of Philanthropic Concerns.Immanuel Kant - 1993 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    This expanded edition of James Ellington’s preeminent translation includes Ellington’s new translation of Kant’s essay Of a Supposed Right to Lie Because of Philanthropic Concerns in which Kant replies to one of the standard objections to his moral theory as presented in the main text: that it requires us to tell the truth even in the face of disastrous consequences.
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  • In Defense of the Land Ethic.J. Baird Callicott - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (3):437-441.
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  • In Defense of the Land Ethic : Essays in Environmental Philosophy, coll. « SUNY Series in Philosophy and Biology ».J. Baird Callicott - 1989 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 179 (4):642-642.
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  • The Case for Animal Rights.Tom Regan - 1985 - Human Studies 8 (4):389-392.
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