Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Science in the Age of Computer Simulation.Eric B. Winsberg - 2010 - University of Chicago Press.
    Introduction -- Sanctioning models : theories and their scope -- Methodology for a virtual world -- A tale of two methods -- When theories shake hands -- Models of climate : values and uncertainties -- Reliability without truth -- Conclusion.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   88 citations  
  • Ethics Without Ontology.Hilary Putnam - 2004 - Harvard University Press.
    In this brief book one of the most distinguished living American philosophers takes up the question of whether ethical judgments can properly be considered ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   109 citations  
  • Realism, Meaning, and Truth.Crispin Wright - 1993 - Blackwell.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   81 citations  
  • Extending Ourselves: Computational Science, Empiricism, and Scientific Method.Paul Humphreys - 2004 - Oxford University Press.
    Computational methods have become the dominant technique in many areas of science. This book contains the first systematic philosophical account of these new methods and their consequences for scientific method. This book will be of interest to philosophers of science and to anyone interested in the role played by computers in modern science.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   150 citations  
  • Realism, Meaning and Truth.Nicholas Asher - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (1):107.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Naming and Necessity.S. Kripke - 1972 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 45 (4):665-666.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1484 citations  
  • Who is a Modeler?Michael Weisberg - 2007 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (2):207-233.
    Many standard philosophical accounts of scientific practice fail to distinguish between modeling and other types of theory construction. This failure is unfortunate because there are important contrasts among the goals, procedures, and representations employed by modelers and other kinds of theorists. We can see some of these differences intuitively when we reflect on the methods of theorists such as Vito Volterra and Linus Pauling on the one hand, and Charles Darwin and Dimitri Mendeleev on the other. Much of Volterra's and (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   154 citations  
  • Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science.Ian Hacking - 1983 - Cambridge University Press.
    This 1983 book is a lively and clearly written introduction to the philosophy of natural science, organized around the central theme of scientific realism. It has two parts. 'Representing' deals with the different philosophical accounts of scientific objectivity and the reality of scientific entities. The views of Kuhn, Feyerabend, Lakatos, Putnam, van Fraassen, and others, are all considered. 'Intervening' presents the first sustained treatment of experimental science for many years and uses it to give a new direction to debates about (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   574 citations  
  • Go Figure: A Path Through Fictionalism.Stephen Yablo - 2001 - Midwest Studies in Philosophy 25 (1):72–102.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   156 citations  
  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. Walton - 1990 - Harvard University Press.
    Mimesis as Make-Believe is important reading for everyone interested in the workings of representational art.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   331 citations  
  • Virtual Realism.Michael Heim - 2000 - Oxford University Press USA.
    Virtual Realism is an art form and a way of living with technology. To explain it, Michael Heim draws on a hypertext of topics, from answering machines to interactive art, from engineering to television programs, from the meaning of UFOs to the Internet. The book begins with the primer 'VR 101'. The issues are discussed, then several chapters illustrate virtual realism with tours through art exhibits and engineering projects. Each chapter suggests a harmony of technology with lifestyle.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Computer Simulations as Experiments.Anouk Barberousse, Sara Franceschelli & Cyrille Imbert - 2009 - Synthese 169 (3):557 - 574.
    Whereas computer simulations involve no direct physical interaction between the machine they are run on and the physical systems they are used to investigate, they are often used as experiments and yield data about these systems. It is commonly argued that they do so because they are implemented on physical machines. We claim that physicality is not necessary for their representational and predictive capacities and that the explanation of why computer simulations generate desired information about their target system is only (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • The Virtual and the Real.David J. Chalmers - 2017 - Disputatio 9 (46):309-352.
    I argue that virtual reality is a sort of genuine reality. In particular, I argue for virtual digitalism, on which virtual objects are real digital objects, and against virtual fictionalism, on which virtual objects are fictional objects. I also argue that perception in virtual reality need not be illusory, and that life in virtual worlds can have roughly the same sort of value as life in non-virtual worlds.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Are We Sims? How Computer Simulations Represent and What This Means for the Simulation Argument.Claus Beisbart - 2014 - The Monist 97 (3):399-417.
    N. Bostrom’s simulation argument and two additional assumptions imply that we likely live in a computer simulation. The argument is based upon the following assumption about the workings of realistic brain simulations: The hardware of a computer on which a brain simulation is run bears a close analogy to the brain itself. To inquire whether this is so, I analyze how computer simulations trace processes in their targets. I describe simulations as fictional, mathematical, pictorial, and material models. Even though the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Are Computer Simulations Experiments? And If Not, How Are They Related to Each Other?Claus Beisbart - 2018 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (2):171-204.
    Computer simulations and experiments share many important features. One way of explaining the similarities is to say that computer simulations just are experiments. This claim is quite popular in the literature. The aim of this paper is to argue against the claim and to develop an alternative explanation of why computer simulations resemble experiments. To this purpose, experiment is characterized in terms of an intervention on a system and of the observation of the reaction. Thus, if computer simulations are experiments, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Fiction.Fred Kroon - forthcoming - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • What is Interactivity?Aaron Smuts - 2009 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 43 (4):pp. 53-73.
    I argue that the term "interactive" should be considered a general-purpose term that indicates something about whatever it is applied to, whether that is art, artifact, or nature. I base my definition in the notion of "interacting with" something. First, I look for essential features of this relation, and then using these features, I develop a notion of interactivity that can help distinguish the interactive from non-interactive arts. Although I am skeptical of the benefits interactivity affords, interactive artworks are significant (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science.Jarrett Leplin - 1985 - Philosophy of Science 52 (2):314-315.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   265 citations  
  • An Inferential Conception of Scientific Representation.Mauricio Suárez - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):767-779.
    This paper defends an inferential conception of scientific representation. It approaches the notion of representation in a deflationary spirit, and minimally characterizes the concept as it appears in science by means of two necessary conditions: its essential directionality and its capacity to allow surrogate reasoning and inference. The conception is defended by showing that it successfully meets the objections that make its competitors, such as isomorphism and similarity, untenable. In addition the inferential conception captures the objectivity of the cognitive representations (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   166 citations  
  • Scientific Realism: How Science Tracks Truth.Stathis Psillos - 1999 - Routledge.
    Scientific Realism is the optimistic view that modern science is on the right track: that the world really is the way our best scientific theories describe it to be. In his book, Stathis Psillos gives us a detailed and comprehensive study, which restores the intuitive plausibility of scientific realism. We see that throughout the twentieth century, scientific realism has been challenged by philosophical positions from all angles: from reductive empiricism, to instrumentalism and modern skeptical empiricism. Scientific Realism explains that the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   404 citations  
  • Simulations, Models, and Theories: Complex Physical Systems and Their Representations.Eric Winsberg - 2001 - Proceedings of the Philosophy of Science Association 2001 (3):S442-.
    Using an example of a computer simulation of the convective structure of a red giant star, this paper argues that simulation is a rich inferential process, and not simply a "number crunching" technique. The scientific practice of simulation, moreover, poses some interesting and challenging epistemological and methodological issues for the philosophy of science. I will also argue that these challenges would be best addressed by a philosophy of science that places less emphasis on the representational capacity of theories (and ascribes (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • The Matrix as Metaphysics.David J. Chalmers - 2005 - In Christopher Grau (ed.), Philosophers Explore the Matrix. Oxford University Press. pp. 132.
    The Matrix presents a version of an old philosophical fable: the brain in a vat. A disembodied brain is floating in a vat, inside a scientist’s laboratory. The scientist has arranged that the brain will be stimulated with the same sort of inputs that a normal embodied brain receives. To do this, the brain is connected to a giant computer simulation of a world. The simulation determines which inputs the brain receives. When the brain produces outputs, these are fed back (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   66 citations  
  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Noel Carroll - 1995 - Philosophical Quarterly 45 (178):93-99.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  • Fictionalism.Matti Eklund - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Representing and Intervening: Introductory Topics in the Philosophy of Natural Science.Davis Baird - 1988 - Noûs 22 (2):299-307.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   230 citations  
  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. Walton - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (2):161-166.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   155 citations  
  • Ethics Without Ontology.S. McGrath - 2004 - Philosophical Review 115 (4):533-535.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • Ethics without Ontology.[author unknown] - 2004 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 68 (2):401-403.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   64 citations  
  • The Strategy of Model-Based Science.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2006 - Biology and Philosophy 21 (5):725-740.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   195 citations  
  • The Ontology of Interactive Art.Dominic McIver Lopes - 2001 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 35 (4):65-81.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. WALTON - 1990 - Philosophy 66 (258):527-529.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   140 citations  
  • Interactivity, Fictionality, and Incompleteness.Nathan Wildman & Richard Woodward - forthcoming - In Grant Tavinor & Jon Robson (eds.), The Aesthetics of Videogames. Routledge.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Concept of Observation in Science and Philosophy.Dudley Shapere - 1982 - Philosophy of Science 49 (4):485-525.
    Through a study of a sophisticated contemporary scientific experiment, it is shown how and why use of the term 'observation' in reference to that experiment departs from ordinary and philosophical usages which associate observation epistemically with perception. The role of "background information" is examined, and general conclusions are arrived at regarding the use of descriptive language in and in talking about science. These conclusions bring out the reasoning by which science builds on what it has learned, and, further, how that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   88 citations  
  • Simulations, Models, and Theories: Complex Physical Systems and Their Representations.Eric Winsberg - 2001 - Philosophy of Science 68 (S3):S442-S454.
    Using an example of a computer simulation of the convective structure of a red giant star, this paper argues that simulation is a rich inferential process, and not simply a "number crunching" technique. The scientific practice of simulation, moreover, poses some interesting and challenging epistemological and methodological issues for the philosophy of science. I will also argue that these challenges would be best addressed by a philosophy of science that places less emphasis on the representational capacity of theories and more (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Realism, Meaning and Truth.Crispin Wright - 1987 - Mind 96 (383):415-418.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • Representing and Intervening.Ian Hacking - 1987 - Revue de Métaphysique et de Morale 92 (2):279-279.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   340 citations  
  • Realism, Meaning and Truth.Crispin Wright - 1992 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 182 (3):333-333.
    Download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Representing and Intervening.Ian Hacking - 1984 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 35 (4):381-390.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   341 citations  
  • Naming and Necessity.Saul A. Kripke - 1985 - Critica 17 (49):69-71.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   977 citations  
  •  .Stathos Psillos - unknown
    means exhaust the insults. This is unfortunate as their attitude turns a useful book, with valuable contributions from a number of writers, into a polemic.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   146 citations