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  1. Painting as an Art.Richard Wollheim - 1987 - Thames & Hudson.
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  • Explaining Depiction.Robert Hopkins - 1995 - Philosophical Review 104 (3):425-455.
    An account of depiction should explain its key features. I identify six: that depiction is from a point of view; that it represents its objects as having a visual appearance; that it depictive content is always reasonably detailed; that misrepresentation is possible, but only within limits; and that the ability to interpret depictions co-varies, given general competence with pictures, with knowledge of what the depicted objects look like. All this suggests that picturing works by capturing appearances, but how more precisely (...)
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  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. WALTON - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (2):161-166.
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  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. WALTON - 1990 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 36:335.
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  • Critique of Pure Reason.I. KANT - 1787/1998 - Philosophy 59 (230):555-557.
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  • Ding Und Baum — Vorlesungen 1907.Edmund Husserl - 1973 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 34 (4):440-441.
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  • The Limits of Photography.Jiri Benovsky - 2014 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 22 (5):716-733.
    This paper is about what counts as a photograph and what does not. One way in which this question arises stems from new technologies that keep changing our way of producing photographs, such as digital photography, which not only has now widely replaced traditional film photography but also challenges the very limits of what we count as a photograph. I shall discuss below at some length different aspects of digital photography, but also want to focus here on a new striking (...)
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  • On Pictures and Photographs: Objections Answered.Kendall L. Walton - 1997 - In Richard Allen & Murray Smith (eds.), Film Theory and Philosophy. Oxford University Press. pp. 60--75.
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  • Factive Pictorial Experience: What's Special About Photographs?Robert Hopkins - 2012 - Noûs 46 (4):709-731.
    What is special about photographs? Traditional photography is, I argue, a system that sustains factive pictorial experience. Photographs sustain pictorial experience: we see things in them. Further, that experience is factive: if suchandsuch is seen in a photograph, then suchandsuch obtained when the photo was taken. More precisely, photographs are designed to sustain factive pictorial experience, and that experience is what we have when, in the photographic system as a whole, everything works as it is supposed to. In this respect (...)
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  • Photography and Representation.Roger Scruton - 1981 - Critical Inquiry 7 (3):577-603.
    It seems odd to say that photography is not a mode of representation. For a photograph has in common with a painting the property by which the painting represents the world, the property of sharing, in some sense, the appearance of its subject. Indeed, it is sometimes thought that since a photograph more effectively shares the appearance of its subject than a typical painting, photography is a better mode of representation. Photography might even be thought of as having replaced painting (...)
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  • Photographic Representation and Depiction of Temporal Extension.Jiri Benovsky - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (2):194-213.
    The main task of this paper is to understand if and how static images like photographs can represent and/or depict temporal extension (duration). In order to do this, a detour will be necessary to understand some features of the nature of photographic representation and depiction in general. This important detour will enable us to see that photographs (can) have a narrative content, and that the skilled photographer can 'tell a story' in a very clear sense, as well as control and (...)
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  • Wollheim on Pictorial Representation.Jerrold Levinson - 1998 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 56 (3):227-233.
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  • Painting as an Art.Richard Wollheim - 1989 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 47 (3):281-284.
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  • Depiction.Christopher Peacocke - 1987 - Philosophical Review 96 (3):383-410.
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  • The Philosophy of Motion Pictures.Noël Carroll - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):401-403.
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  • Photography and Causation: Responding to Scruton's Scepticism.Dawn M. Phillips - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):327-340.
    According to Roger Scruton, it is not possible for photographs to be representational art. Most responses to Scruton’s scepticism are versions of the claim that Scruton disregards the extent to which intentionality features in photography; but these cannot force him to give up his notion of the ideal photograph. My approach is to argue that Scruton has misconstrued the role of causation in his discussion of photography. I claim that although Scruton insists that the ideal photograph is defined by its (...)
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  • Perception and Imagination: Amodal Perception as Mental Imagery.Bence Nanay - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 150 (2):239-254.
    When we see an object, we also represent those parts of it that are not visible. The question is how we represent them: this is the problem of amodal perception. I will consider three possible accounts: (a) we see them, (b) we have non-perceptual beliefs about them and (c) we have immediate perceptual access to them, and point out that all of these views face both empirical and conceptual objections. I suggest and defend a fourth account, according to which we (...)
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