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  1. Understanding Space-Time: The Philosophical Development of Physics From Newton to Einstein.Robert DiSalle - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Presenting the history of space-time physics, from Newton to Einstein, as a philosophical development DiSalle reflects our increasing understanding of the connections between ideas of space and time and our physical knowledge. He suggests that philosophy's greatest impact on physics has come about, less by the influence of philosophical hypotheses, than by the philosophical analysis of concepts of space, time and motion, and the roles they play in our assumptions about physical objects and physical measurements. This way of thinking leads (...)
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  • The Mechanical Philosophy and Newton’s Mechanical Force.Hylarie Kochiras - 2013 - Philosophy of Science 80 (4):557-578.
    How does Newton approach the challenge of mechanizing gravity and, more broadly, natural philosophy? By adopting the simple machine tradition’s mathematical approach to a system’s co-varying parameters of change, he retains natural philosophy’s traditional goal while specifying it in a novel way as the search for impressed forces. He accordingly understands the physical world as a divinely created machine possessing intrinsically mathematical features, and mathematical methods as capable of identifying its real features. The gravitational force’s physical cause remains an outstanding (...)
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  • Newton’s Challenge to Philosophy: A Programmatic Essay.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 1 (1):101-128.
    I identify a set of interlocking views that became (and still are) very influential within philosophy in the wake of Newton’s success. These views use the authority of natural philosophy/mechanics to settle debates within philosophy. I label these “Newton’s Challenge.”.
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  • Introduction.Eric Schliesser & Zvi Biener - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford University Press.
    The introduction considers the state of scholarship on empiricism as a philosophical and historical category, particularly as it pertains to experimental philosophy. It concludes that empiricism properly understood is a rich category encompassing epistemic, semantic, methodological, experimental, and moral elements. Its richness makes it a suitable lens through which to account for actual historical complexity. The introduction relates the category to the work of Sir Isaac Newton, who influenced all of empiricism’s elements.
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  • Introduction to Newton and Empiricism.Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser - 2014 - In Zvi Biener & Eric Schliesser (eds.), Newton and Empiricism. Oxford University Press. pp. 1-15.
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  • Newton's Principia.Chris Smeenk & Eric Schliesser - 2014 - In Jed Z. Buchwald & R. Fox (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Physics. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 109-165.
    The Oxford Handbook of the History of Physics brings together cutting-edge writing by more than twenty leading authorities on the history of physics from the seventeenth century to the present day. By presenting a wide diversity of studies in a single volume, it provides authoritative introductions to scholarly contributions that have tended to be dispersed in journals and books not easily accessible to the general reader. While the core thread remains the theories and experimental practices of physics, the Handbook contains (...)
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  • Prescribing Laws to Nature. Part I. Newton, the Pre-Critical Kant, and Three Problems About the Lawfulness of Nature.Michela Massimi - 2014 - Kant-Studien 105 (4):491-508.
    Name der Zeitschrift: Kant-Studien Jahrgang: 105 Heft: 4 Seiten: 491-508.
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  • The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.Isaac Newton - 1999 - University of California Press.
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  • The Metaphysics Within Physics.Tim Maudlin - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    A modest proposal concerning laws, counterfactuals, and explanations - - Why be Humean? -- Suggestions from physics for deep metaphysics -- On the passing of time -- Causation, counterfactuals, and the third factor -- The whole ball of wax -- Epilogue : a remark on the method of metaphysics.
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  • A Dialogue with Descartes: Newton's Ontology of True and Immutable Natures.J. E. McGuire - 2007 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 45 (1):103-125.
    : This article is concerned with Newton's appropriation of Descartes' ontology of true and immutable natures in developing his theory of infinitely extended space. It contends that unless the part played by the Platonic distinction between "being a nature" and "having a nature" in Newton's thinking is properly appreciated the foundation of his doctrine of space in relation to God will not be fully understood. It also contends that Newton's Platonism is consistent with his empiricism once the mediating role is (...)
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  • The Metaphysics within Physics.[author unknown] - 2007 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 69 (3):610-611.
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  • The Metaphysics Within Physics. [REVIEW]Tim Maudlin - 2009 - Analysis 69 (2):374-375.
    The basic idea of Maudlin's superb book is methodological: ‘metaphysics, insofar as it is concerned with the natural world, can do no better than to reflect on physics. Physical theories provide us with the best handle we have on what there is, and the philosopher's proper task is the interpretation and elucidation of those theories. In particular, when choosing the fundamental posits of one's ontology, one must look to scientific practice rather than to philosophical prejudice’.The apparently diverse topics covered by (...)
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  • Newtonian Emanation, Spinozism, Measurement and the Baconian Origins of the Laws of Nature.Eric Schliesser - 2013 - Foundations of Science 18 (3):449-466.
    The first two sections of this paper investigate what Newton could have meant in a now famous passage from “De Graviatione” (hereafter “DeGrav”) that “space is as it were an emanative effect of God.” First it offers a careful examination of the four key passages within DeGrav that bear on this. The paper shows that the internal logic of Newton’s argument permits several interpretations. In doing so, the paper calls attention to a Spinozistic strain in Newton’s thought. Second it sketches (...)
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  • Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument.Robert H. Hurlbutt - 1965 - Lincoln, University of Nebraska Press.
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  • Hume, Newton, and the Design Argument.Robert H. Hurlbutt & Wallace I. Matson - 1965 - Philosophy 41 (156):181-183.
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  • Atoms and the ‘Analogy of Nature’: Newton's Third Rule of Philosophizing.J. E. McGuire - 1970 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 1 (1):3-58.
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  • Causation and Laws of Nature in Early Modern Philosophy.Walter Ott - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Arguing for controversial readings of many of the canonical figures, the book also focuses on lesser-known writers such as Pierre-Sylvain Regis, Nicolas ...
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  • The Problem of Secondary Causation in Descartes: A Response to Des Chene.Helen Hattab - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (2):93-118.
    : In this paper I address the vexed question of secondary causation in René Descartes' physics, and examine several influential interpretations, especially the one recently proposed by Dennis Des Chene. I argue that interpreters who regard Cartesian bodies as real secondary causes, on the grounds that the modes of body include real forces, contradict Descartes' account of modes. On the other hand, those who deny that Descartes affirms secondary causation, on the grounds that forces cannot be modes of extension, commit (...)
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  • On Reading Newton as an Epicurean: Kant, Spinozism and the Changes to the Principia.Eric Schliesser - 2013 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 44 (3):416-428.
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  • Newton’s Substance Monism, Distant Action, and the Nature of Newton’s Empiricism: Discussion of H. Kochiras “Gravity and Newton’s Substance Counting Problem”.Eric Schliesser - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (1):160-166.
    This paper is a critical response to Hylarie Kochiras’ “Gravity and Newton’s substance counting problem,” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 40 267–280. First, the paper argues that Kochiras conflates substances and beings; it proceeds to show that Newton is a substance monist. The paper argues that on methodological grounds Newton has adequate resources to respond to the metaphysical problems diagnosed by Kochiras. Second, the paper argues against the claim that Newton is committed to two speculative doctrines attributed to (...)
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  • Qualities, Properties, and Laws in Newton’s Induction.David Marshall Miller - 2009 - Philosophy of Science 76 (5):1052-1063.
    Newton’s argument for universal gravitation in the Principia eventually rested on the third “Rule of Philosophizing,” which warrants the generalization of “qualities of bodies.” An analysis of the rule and the history of its development indicate that the term ‘quality’ should be taken to include both inherent properties of bodies and relations among systems of bodies, generalized into `laws'. By incorporating law‐induction into the rule, Newton could legitimately rebuff objections to his theory by claiming that universal gravitation was justified by (...)
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  • The Resources of a Mechanist Physiology and the Problem of Goal-Directed Processes.Stephen Gaukroger - 2000 - In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 383--400.
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  • Dynamics of Reason.Michael Friedman - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (3):702-712.
    This book introduces a new approach to the issue of radical scientific revolutions, or "paradigm-shifts," given prominence in the work of Thomas Kuhn. The book articulates a dynamical and historicized version of the conception of scientific a priori principles first developed by the philosopher Immanuel Kant. This approach defends the Enlightenment ideal of scientific objectivity and universality while simultaneously doing justice to the revolutionary changes within the sciences that have since undermined Kant's original defense of this ideal. Through a modified (...)
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  • "From the Phenomena of Motions to the Forces of Nature": Hypothesis or Deduction?Howard Stein - 1990 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1990:209 - 222.
    This paper examines Newton's argument from the phenomena to the law of universal gravitation-especially the question how such a result could have been obtained from the evidential base on which that argument rests. Its thesis is that the crucial step was a certain application of the third law of motion-one that could only be justified by appeal to the consequences of the resulting theory; and that the general concept of interaction embodied in Newton's use of the third law most probably (...)
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  • The Essential Tension.Thomas S. Kuhn - 1978 - Philosophy of Science 45 (4):649-652.
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  • Atoms and the 'Analogy of Nature': Newton's Third Rule of Philosophizing.J. E. Mcguire - 1970 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 1 (1):3.
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  • "David." Phenomenology.".Woodruff Smith - 2008 - In Edward Zalta (ed.), Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Isaac Newton.George Smith - 2008 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  • Newton's Concepts of Force and Mass, with Notes on the Laws of Motion.I. Bernard Cohen - 2002 - In I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Newton. Cambridge University Press. pp. 57--84.
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  • A Different Descartes: Descartes and the Programme for a Mathematical Physics in His Correspondence.Daniel Garber - 2000 - In John Schuster, Stephen Gaukroger & John Sutton (eds.), Descartes' Natural Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 113--130.
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  • General Scholium.Isaac Newton - 1999 - In The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. University of California Press. pp. 939-944.
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  • Laws of Motion.[author unknown] - 1945 - Philosophical Studies of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 2:11-27.
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  • Newton's Philosophical Analysis of Space and Time.Robert DiSalle - 2002 - In I. Bernard Cohen & George E. Smith (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Newton. Cambridge University Press. pp. 33--56.
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