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  1. Poetics: With the Tractatus Coislinianus, Reconstruction of Poetics Ii, and the Fragments of the on Poets.S. H. Aristotle & Butcher - 1932 - Hackett Publishing Company.
    Richard Janko's acclaimed translation of Aristotle's _Poetics_ is accompanied by the most comprehensive commentary available in English that does not presume knowledge of the original Greek. Two other unique features are Janko's translations with notes of both the _Tractatus Coislinianus_, which is argued to be a summary of the lost second book of the Poetics, and fragments of Aristotle’s dialogue On Poets, including recently discovered texts about catharsis, which appear in English for the first time.
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  • Studies in the Way of Words.Paul Grice - 1989 - Philosophy 65 (251):111-113.
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  • Art, Emotion and Ethics.Berys Gaut - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (2):199-201.
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  • Counterfactuals.David Lewis - 1973 - Philosophy of Science 42 (3):341-344.
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  • The Nature of Fiction.Gregory Currie - 1990 - Cambridge University Press.
    This important book provides a theory about the nature of fiction, and about the relation between the author, the reader and the fictional text. The approach is philosophical: that is to say, the author offers an account of key concepts such as fictional truth, fictional characters, and fiction itself. The book argues that the concept of fiction can be explained partly in terms of communicative intentions, partly in terms of a condition which excludes relations of counterfactual dependence between the world (...)
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  • The Nature of Fiction.Susan L. Feagin - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):948.
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  • Poetics.W. Hamilton Aristotle, W. Rhys Longinus, Demetrius, Fyfe & Roberts - 2006 - Focus.
    A complete translation of Aristotle's classic that is both faithful and readable, along with an introduction that provides the modern reader with a means of understanding this seminal work and its impact on our culture. In this volume, Joe Sachs (translator of Aristotle's _Physics, Metaphysics,_ and the _Nicomachean Ethics _)also supplements his excellent translation with well-chosen notes and glossary of important terms. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a (...)
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  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts by Kendall Walton. [REVIEW]Gregory Currie - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (7):367-370.
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  • Fiction and Narrative.Derek Matravers - 2014 - Oxford, GB: Oxford University Press.
    Do fictions depend upon imagination? Derek Matravers argues against the mainstream view that they do, and offers an original account of what it is to read, listen to, or watch a narrative. He downgrades the divide between fiction and non-fiction, largely dispenses with the imagination, and in doing so illuminates a succession of related issues.
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  • Art and Modal Knowledge.Dustin Stokes - 2004 - In Dominic Lopes & Matthew Kieran (eds.), Knowing Art: Essays in Epistemology and Aesthetics. Springer.
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  • Art, emotion and ethics.Berys Nigel Gaut - 2007 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    The long debate -- Aesthetics and ethics : basic concepts -- A conceptual map -- Autonomism -- Artistic and critical practices -- Questions of character -- The cognitive argument : the epistemic claim -- The cognitive argument : the aesthetic claim -- Emotion and imagination -- The merited response argument.
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  • Mimesis as make-believe: on the foundations of the representational arts.Kendall L. Walton - 1990 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
    Mimesis as Make-Believe is important reading for everyone interested in the workings of representational art.
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  • Studies in the way of words.Herbert Paul Grice - 1989 - Cambridge: Harvard University Press.
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  • The moral psychology of fiction.Gregory Currie - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):250 – 259.
    What can we learn from fiction? I argue that we can learn about the consequences of a certain course of action by projecting ourselves, in imagination, into the situation of the fiction's characters.
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  • Is conceivability a guide to possibility?Stephen Yablo - 1993 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 53 (1):1-42.
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  • Does conceivability entail possibility.David J. Chalmers - 2002 - In Tamar Gendler & John Hawthorne (eds.), Conceivability and Possibility. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 145--200.
    There is a long tradition in philosophy of using a priori methods to draw conclusions about what is possible and what is necessary, and often in turn to draw conclusions about matters of substantive metaphysics. Arguments like this typically have three steps: first an epistemic claim , from there to a modal claim , and from there to a metaphysical claim.
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  • Narrating the Truth (More or Less).Stacie Friend - 2006 - In Matthew Kieran & Dominic McIver Lopes (eds.), Knowing Art: Essays in Aesthetics and Epistemology. pp. 35-50.
    While aestheticians have devoted substantial attention to the possibility of acquiring knowledge from fiction, little of this attention has been directed at the acquisition of factual information. The neglect traces, I believe, to the assumption that the task of aesthetics is to explain the special cognitive value of fiction. While the value of many works of nonfiction may be measured, in part, by their ability to transmit information, most works of fiction do not have this aim, and so many conclude (...)
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  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. WALTON - 1990 - Philosophy 66 (258):527-529.
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  • Mimesis as Make-Believe: On the Foundations of the Representational Arts.Kendall L. Walton - 1990 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 49 (2):161-166.
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  • Realism of Character and the Value of Fiction.Gregory Currie - 1998 - In Jerrold Levinson (ed.), Aesthetics and Ethics: Essays at the Intersection. New York: Cambridge University Press. pp. 161--81.
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  • I—Kathleen Stock: Fictive Utterance and Imagining.Kathleen Stock - 2011 - Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 85 (1):145-161.
    A popular approach to defining fictive utterance says that, necessarily, it is intended to produce imagining. I shall argue that this is not falsified by the fact that some fictive utterances are intended to be believed, or are non-accidentally true. That this is so becomes apparent given a proper understanding of the relation of what one imagines to one's belief set. In light of this understanding, I shall then argue that being intended to produce imagining is sufficient for fictive utterance (...)
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  • Messages 'in' and messages 'through' art.David Novitz - 1995 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 73 (2):199 – 203.
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