Switch to: Citations

References in:

Locke on Persons and Personal Identity

Oxford: Oxford University Press (2021)

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Explaining Consciousness.David M. Rosenthal - 2002 - In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Classical and Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. pp. 109-131.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   90 citations  
  • "The great ocean of knowledge": the influence of travel literature on the work of John Locke.Ann Talbot - 2010 - Boston: Brill.
    This book explores the way in which, working within the investigative tradition associated with the Royal Society, the philosopher John Locke (1632-1704) used ...
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Identity.Harold Noonan & Benjamin L. Curtis - 2022 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Much of the debate about identity in recent decades has been about personal identity, and specifically about personal identity over time, but identity generally, and the identity of things of other kinds, have also attracted attention. Various interrelated problems have been at the centre of discussion, but it is fair to say that recent work has focussed particularly on the following areas: the notion of a criterion of identity; the correct analysis of identity over time, and, in particular, the disagreement (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  • Locke on individuation and the corpuscular basis of kinds.Dan Kaufman - 2007 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):499–534.
    In a well-known paper, Reginald Jackson expresses a sentiment not uncommon among readers of Locke: “Among the merits of Locke’s Essay…not even the friendliest critic would number consistency.”2 This unflattering opinion of Locke is reiterated by Maurice Mandelbaum: “Under no circumstances can [Locke] be counted among the clearest and most consistent of philosophers.”3 The now familiar story is that there are innumerable inconsistencies and internal problems contained in Locke’s Essay. In fact, it is probably safe to say that there is (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Toland, Leibniz, and Active Matter.Stewart Duncan - 2013 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 6:249-78.
    In the early years of the eighteenth century Leibniz had several interactions with John Toland. These included, from 1702 to 1704, discussions of materialism. Those discussions culminated with the consideration of Toland's 1704 Letters to Serena, where Toland argued that matter is necessarily active. In this paper I argue for two main theses about this exchange and its consequences for our wider understanding. The first is that, despite many claims that Toland was at the time of Letters to Serena a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Lockean superaddition and Lockean humility.Patrick J. Connolly - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:53-61.
    This paper offers a new approach to an old debate about superaddition in Locke. Did Locke claim that some objects have powers that are unrelated to their natures or real essences? The question has split commentators. Some (Wilson, Stuart, Langton) claim the answer is yes and others (Ayers, Downing, Ott) claim the answer is no. This paper argues that both of these positions may be mistaken. I show that Locke embraced a robust epistemic humility. This epistemic humility includes ignorance of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Explaining consciousness.David M. Rosenthal - 1993 - In David J. Chalmers (ed.), Philosophy of Mind: Contemporary Readings. Oxford University Press. pp. 406--421.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  • Hume and the problem of personal identity.Jane L. Mcintyre - 1993 - In David Fate Norton & Jacqueline Taylor (eds.), The Cambridge Companion to Hume. New York: Cambridge University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Two arguments for lockean four‐dimensionalism.Christopher H. Conn - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (3):429 – 446.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Locke on the ontology of matter, living things and persons.Vere Chappell - 1990 - Philosophical Studies 60 (1-2):19 - 32.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Shaftesbury on Liberty and Self-Mastery.Ruth Boeker - 2019 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 27 (5):731-752.
    The aim of this paper is to show that Shaftesbury’s thinking about liberty is best understood in terms of self-mastery. To examine his understanding of liberty, I turn to a painting that he commissioned on the ancient theme of the choice of Hercules and the notes that he prepared for the artist. Questions of human choice are also present in the so-called story of an amour, which addresses the difficulties of controlling human passions. Jaffro distinguishes three notions of self-control that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Shaftesbury on Persons, Personal Identity, and Character Development.Ruth Boeker - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (1):e12471.
    Shaftesbury’s major work Characteristicks of Men, Manners, Opinions, Times was one of the most influential English works in the eighteenth century. This paper focuses on his contributions to debates about persons and personal identity and shows that Shaftesbury regards metaphysical questions of personal identity as closely connected with normative questions of character development. I argue that he is willing to accept that persons are substances and that he takes their continued existence for granted. He sees the need to supplement metaphysical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Locke on Personal Identity: A Response to the Problems of His Predecessors.Ruth Boeker - 2017 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 55 (3):407-434.
    john locke argues that personal identity consists in sameness of consciousness, and he maintains that any other theory of personal identity would lead to "great Absurdities".1 This statement intimates that Locke thought carefully about alternative conceptions of personal identity and their problems. In this paper, I argue that, by understanding Locke's account of personal identity in the context of metaphysical and religious debates of his time, especially debates concerning the afterlife and the state of the soul between death and resurrection, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Locke and Hume on Personal Identity: Moral and Religious Differences.Ruth Boeker - 2015 - Hume Studies 41 (2):105-135.
    Hume’s theory of personal identity is developed in response to Locke’s account of personal identity. Yet it is striking that Hume does not emphasize Locke’s distinction between persons and human beings. It seems even more striking that Hume’s account of the self in Books 2 and 3 of the Treatise has less scope for distinguishing persons from human beings than his account in Book 1. This is puzzling, because Locke originally introduced the distinction in order to answer questions of moral (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Locke on Persons and Personal Identity.David P. Behan - 1979 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 9 (1):53 - 75.
    Criticism of Locke's account of personal identity has proceeded cumulatively. Three years after the publication of the chapter “Of Identity and Diversity”, John Sergeant raised an objection which, in Bishop Butler's hands, was to become famous as the dictum that “one should really think it self-evident that consciousness of personal identity presupposes, and therefore cannot constitute, personal identity: any more than knowledge, in any other case, can constitute truth, which it presupposes”. Berkeley added, in effect, that when consciousness is taken (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Locke and the Problem of Personal Identity.Antony Flew - 1951 - Philosophy 26 (96):53 - 68.
    Locke's contribution to the discussion was fourfold: First , he saw the importance of the problem; Second , he realized that the puzzle cases, the “strange suppositions,” were relevant; Third , he maintained “same” had a different meaning when applied to “person” from its meaning in other contexts; and, Fourth , he offered his much criticized solution of the problem.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Locke and botany.Peter R. Anstey & Stephen A. Harris - 2006 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 37 (2):151-171.
    This paper argues that the English philosopher John Locke, who has normally been thought to have had only an amateurish interest in botany, was far more involved in the botanical science of his day than has previously been known. Through the presentation of new evidence deriving from Locke’s own herbarium, his manuscript notes, journal and correspondence, it is established that Locke made a modest contribution to early modern botany. It is shown that Locke had close and ongoing relations with the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • John Locke and the Philosophy of Mind.Peter R. Anstey - 2015 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (2):221-244.
    This paper argues that, while Locke’s unstable usage of the term ‘mind’ prevents us from claiming that he had a theory of mind, it can still be said that he made a contribution to the philosophy of mind in its contemporary sense. After establishing that it was the term ‘soul’ that predominated in early modern British philosophy, the paper turns to Locke’s three central notions of the soul, the understanding, and the person. It is argued that there are two stages (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Locke on people and substances.William P. Alston & Jonathan Bennett - 1988 - Philosophical Review 97 (1):25-46.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Locke and William Molyneux.Ruth Boeker - 2021 - In Jessica Gordon-Roth & Shelley Weinberg (eds.), The Lockean Mind. New York, NY: Routledge.
    William Molyneux (1656–1698) was an Irish experimental philosopher and politician, who played a major role in the intellectual life in seventeenth-century Dublin. He became Locke’s friend and correspondent in 1692 and was probably Locke’s philosophically most significant correspondent. Locke approached Molyneux for advice for revising his Essay concerning Human Understanding as he was preparing the second and subsequent editions. Locke made several changes in response to Molyneux’s suggestions; they include major revisions of the chapter ‘Of Power’ (2.21), the addition of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Ontological relativity and relative identity.Peter Thomas Geach - 1973 - In Milton Karl Munitz (ed.), Logic and ontology. New York,: New York University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   35 citations  
  • Locke on Consciousness, Personal Identity and the Idea of Duration.Gideon Yaffe - 2011 - Noûs 45 (3):387-408.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Varieties of early modern materialism.Falk Wunderlich - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):797-813.
    ABSTRACTThis paper discusses how early modern materialism can be defined and delineated, before turning to a brief survey of the main philosophical resources early modern materialist theories draw on. Subsequently, I discuss competing overall narratives concerning early modern materialism, and conclude with a defence of the controversial view that material soul theories belong to materialism proper.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • On grounding superadded properties in Locke.Joshua M. Wood - 2016 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 24 (5):878-896.
    ABSTRACTScholars have employed three interpretive strategies to explain how Locke understands the metaphysical relationship between a superadded property and the material body to which it is affixed. The first is the mechanist strategy advanced by Michael Ayers and Edwin McCann. It argues that the mechanical affections of a given body are causally responsible for the operation of superadded powers. The second is the extrinsic strategy found in Mathew Stuart. It argues that Locke, who rejects mechanism, does not intend to ground (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The new Hume.Kenneth P. Winkler - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (4):541-579.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  • Locke on personal identity.Kenneth Winkler - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (2):201-226.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   41 citations  
  • Personal Identity and Individuation.Bernard Williams - 1957 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 57:229-252.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   65 citations  
  • Locke on Personal Identity.Shelley Weinberg - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (6):398-407.
    Locke’s account of personal identity has been highly influential because of its emphasis on a psychological criterion. The same consciousness is required for being the same person. It is not so clear, however, exactly what Locke meant by ‘consciousness’ or by ‘having the same consciousness’. Interpretations vary: consciousness is seen as identical to memory, as identical to a first personal appropriation of mental states, and as identical to a first personal distinctive experience of the qualitative features of one’s own thinking. (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Sympathy and the Mechanics of Character Change.Anik Waldow - 2012 - Hume Studies 38 (2):221-242.
    Hume holds that sympathy is both crucial for making moral judgments and a distorting influence that prevents us from assessing the virtue of characters impartially. He writes, When any quality, or character, has a tendency to the good of mankind, we are pleas’d with it, and approve of it; because it presents the lively idea of pleasure; which idea affects us by sympathy, and is itself a kind of pleasure. But as this sympathy is very variable, it may be thought, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Locke on superaddition and mechanism.Matthew Stuart - 1998 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 6 (3):351 – 379.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Locke, the Law of Nature, and Polygamy.Susanne Sreedhar & Julie Walsh - 2016 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 2 (1):91-110.
    When Locke mentions polygamy in his writings, he does not condemn the practice and, even seems to endorse it under certain conditions. This attitude is out of step with many of his contemporaries. Identifying the philosophical reasons that lead Locke to have this attitude about polygamy motivates our project. Because Locke never wrote a treatise on ethics, we look to number of different texts, but focus on An Essay Concerning Human Understanding and Essays on the Law of Nature, in order (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • From a Rational Point of View.Carol Rovane - 2002 - Philosophical Topics 30 (1):209-235.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Shaftesbury on self as a Practice.Susan M. Purviance - 2004 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 2 (2):154-163.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Personal Identity: A Defence of Locke.M. W. Hughes - 1975 - Philosophy 50 (192):169 - 187.
    The theory of personal identity should illuminate and be illuminated by the theory of personality, of which it is a part. I believe that Locke's theory succeeds in this more than that of any other great philosopher, and the modifications which it may need are not fundamental ones. The problems raised by Butler and Flew can be made to disappear.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Personal identity and the passions.Jane L. McIntyre - 1989 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 27 (4):545-557.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Locke on Identity: Matter, Life, and Consciousness.Edwin McCann - 1987 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 69 (1):54-77.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Locke on Active Power and the Obscure Idea of Active Power from Bodies.R. M. Mattern - 1980 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 11 (1):39.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Consciousness as internal monitoring.William G. Lycan - 1995 - Philosophical Perspectives 9:1-14.
    Locke put forward the theory of consciousness as "internal Sense" or "reflection"; Kant made it inner sense, by means of which the mind intuits itself or its inner state." On that theory, consciousness is a perception-like second-order representing of our own psychological states events. The term "consciousness," of course, has many distinct uses.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   56 citations  
  • Locke: Compatibilist Event‐Causalist or Libertarian Substance‐Causalist? [REVIEW]E. J. Lowe - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (3):688-701.
    Towards the end of Chapter XXI of Book II of the Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Locke remarks, with all the appearance of sincerity and genuine modesty, that.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Anthony Collins on the Status of Consciousness.Vili Lähteenmäki - 2014 - Vivarium 52 (3-4):315-332.
    Anthony Collins (1676-1729) maintains that consciousness might be a material process or result from material processes. On the one hand, Collins accepts Locke’s view that from consciousness, i.e., the activity of thinking, we acquire no knowledge about the nature of the thinking substance. On the other, he takes seriously Samuel Clarke’s challenge that the thinking substance must be suitably unified because consciousness is unified. In this paper, I argue that, throughout his correspondence with Clarke, Collins maintains that consciousness signifies actual (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Locke on Persons and Other Kinds of Substances.Matthew A. Leisinger - 2018 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 100 (1):129-155.
    Locke’s commentators are divided about whether Locke thinks that the idea of a person is a substance-idea or a mode-idea. I use Locke’s theory of kinds to argue for an intermediate interpretation on which the idea of a person is a substance-idea that contains a mode-idea. As a result, while proponents of the substance interpretation correctly claim that ‘person’ designates a kind of substance, proponents of the mode interpretation are nonetheless correct in insisting that mode-ideas play an important role in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Locke and the relativisation of identity.Bruce Langtry - 1975 - Philosophical Studies 27 (6):401 - 409.
    Arc there cases in which an object x is thc same F as an object y but x is not the same G as y, cvcn though x is a G? A11 aihrmativc answer will have drastic repercussions 011 0ne’s account of identity and on one’s quantification theory. For suppose that the expression ‘x is the same F as y’ can be understood as ‘x is an F and y is an F and x is identical with y’, and that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Locke on Consciousness and What it is About.Vili Lähteenmäki - 2011 - Studia Leibnitiana 43 (2):160-178.
    As Locke claims that consciousness of our being is involved in all thought and perception, he treats all consciousness as some type of self-consciousness. I examine how consciousness relates to what it is about by inquiring into the intimate relations between consciousness and mental acts and consciousness and the self.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Damaris cudworth, lady masham: Between platonism and enlightenment.Sarah Hutton - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 1 (1):29 – 54.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Locke on the Ontology of Persons.Jessica Gordon-Roth - 2015 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 53 (1):97-123.
    The importance of John Locke's discussion of persons is undeniable. Locke never explicitly tells us whether he thinks persons are substances or modes, however. We are thus left in the dark about a fundamental aspect of Locke's view. Many commentators have recently claimed that Lockean persons are modes. In this paper I swim against the current tide in the secondary literature and argue that Lockean persons are substances. Specifically I argue that what Locke says about substance, power, and agency commits (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Shaftesbury on life as a work of art.Michael B. Gill - 2018 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 26 (6):1110-1131.
    ABSTRACTThis paper explicates Shaftesbury’s idea that we ought to live our lives as though they are works of art. I show that this idea is central to many of Shaftesbury’s most important claims, and that an understanding of this idea enables us to answer some of the most contested questions in the scholarship on Characteristics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • From Cambridge Platonism to Scottish Sentimentalism.Michael B. Gill - 2010 - Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (1):13-31.
    The Cambridge Platonists were a group of religious thinkers who attended and taught at Cambridge from the 1640s until the 1660s. The four most important of them were Benjamin Whichcote, John Smith, Ralph Cudworth, and Henry More. The most prominent sentimentalist moral philosophers of the Scottish Enlightenment – Hutcheson, Hume, and Adam Smith – knew of the works of the Cambridge Platonists. But the Scottish sentimentalists typically referred to the Cambridge Platonists only briefly and in passing. The surface of Hutcheson, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Locke.Samuel Charles Rickless - 2014 - Hoboken: Wiley-Blackwell.
    In a focused assessment of one of the founding members of the liberal tradition in philosophy and a self-proclaimed “Under-Labourer” working to support the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century, the author maps the full range of John Locke’s highly influential ideas, which even today remain at the heart of debates about the nature of reality and our knowledge of it, as well as our moral and political rights and duties. Comprehensive introduction to the full range of Locke’s ideas, providing (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   21 citations  
  • Locke.Vere Claiborne Chappell (ed.) - 1998 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    This new volume in the successful Oxford Readings in Philosophy series presents a selection of the best recent articles on the main topics in Locke's philosophy. These include: innate ideas, ideas and perception, primary and secondary qualities, free will, substance, personal identity, language, essence, knowledge, and belief. The authors include some of the world's leading Locke scholars, and their essays exemplify the best - and most accessible - recent scholarship on Locke, making the volume essential for students and specialists.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • Shaftesbury.John McAteer - 2011 - In James Fieser & Bradley Dowden (eds.), Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Anthony Ashley Cooper, the Third Earl of Shaftesbury (1671-1713) was an English philosopher who profoundly influenced 18th century thought in Britain, France, and Germany, particularly in the areas of aesthetics, ethics, and religion.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations