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A Platonic Kind-Based Account of Goodness

Philosophia 49 (4):1369-1389 (2021)

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  1. Finite and Infinite Goods: A Framework for Ethics. [REVIEW]Melissa Barry - 2002 - Philosophical Review 111 (2):259-261.
    In Finite and Infinite Goods, Adams develops a sophisticated and richly detailed Platonic-theistic framework for ethics. The view is Platonic in virtue of being Good-centered; it is theistic both in identifying God with the Good and, more distinctively, in including a divine command theory of moral obligation. Readers familiar with Adams’s earlier divine command theory will recall that in response to the worry that God might command something evil, Adams introduced an independent value constraint, claiming that only the commands of (...)
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  • Non-Naturalism and Normative Necessities.Stephanie Leary - 2017 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 12.
    This chapter argues that the best way for a non-naturalist to explain why the normative supervenes on the natural is to claim that, while there are some sui generis normative properties whose essences cannot be fully specified in non-normative terms and do not specify any non-normative sufficient conditions for their instantiation, there are certain hybrid normative properties whose essences specify both naturalistic sufficient conditions for their own instantiation and sufficient conditions for the instantiation of certain sui generis normative properties. This (...)
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  • Robust Ethical Realism, Non-Naturalism, and Normativity.William Joseph FitzPatrick - 2008 - Oxford Studies in Metaethics 3:159-205.
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  • God and Moral Law: On the Theistic Explanation of Morality.Mark C. Murphy - 2011 - Oxford University Press.
    Does God's existence make a difference to how we explain morality? Mark C. Murphy critiques the two dominant theistic accounts of morality--natural law theory and divine command theory--and presents a novel third view. He argues that we can value natural facts about humans and their good, while keeping God at the centre of our moral explanations.
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  • Robust Ethical Realism, Non-Naturalism, and Normativity.William FitzPatrick - 2008 - In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics: Volume Iii. Oxford University Press.
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  • An Ebola-Like Microbe and The Limits of Kind-Based Goodness.Berman Chan - 2021 - Philosophia:1-21.
    Aristotelian theory, as found in Michael Thompson and Philippa Foot, claims that to be good is to be good as a member of that kind, and so there are varying standards of goodness dependent on an individual’s kind-membership. It is a perhaps little noticed feature of Foot’s project, in particular, that it aims to provide more than just a kind-relative account, but seeks an exhaustive account of goodness. She concludes, in effect, that goodness admits of only the kind-based sort. Accordingly, (...)
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  • Philosophical Papers: Mind, Language and Reality.Hilary Putnam - 1975 - Cambridge University Press.
    18 Probability and confirmation* The story of deductive logic is well known. Until the beginning of the nineteenth century, deductive logic as a subject was ...
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  • Finite and Infinite Goods: A Framework for Ethics.Robert Merrihew Adams - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    Renowned scholar Robert Adams explores the relation between religion and ethics through a comprehensive philosophical account of a theistically-based framework for ethics. Adams' framework begins with the good rather than the right, and with excellence rather than usefulness. He argues that loving the excellent, of which adoring God is a clear example, is the most fundamental aspect of a life well lived. Developing his original and detailed theory, Adams contends that devotion, the sacred, grace, martyrdom, worship, vocation, faith, and other (...)
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  • Discussion on the Importance of Making Things Right.Jonathan Dancy - unknown
    Critical notice of 'From metaphysics to ethics' by Frank Jackson.
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  • The Representation of Life.Michael Thompson - 1995 - In Rosalind Hursthouse, Gavin Lawrence & Warren Quinn (eds.), Virtues and Reasons. Clarendon Press. pp. 247--296.
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  • Rationality and Goodness.Philippa Foot - 2004 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 54:1-13.
    The problem I am going to discuss here concerns practical rationality, rationality not in thought but in action. More particularly, I am going to discuss the rationality, or absence of rationality of moral action. And ‘moral action’ shall mean here something done by someone who believes that to act otherwise would be contrary to, say, justice or charity; or again not done because it is thought that it would be unjust or uncharitable to do it. The question is whether in (...)
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  • Natural Goodness.Philippa Foot - 2001 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 64 (3):604-606.
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  • Dependent Rational Animals: Why Human Beings Need The Virtues.Alasdair Macintyre - 1999 - Environmental Values 9 (2):259-261.
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  • Dependent Rational Animals. Why Human Beings need the Virtues.Alasdair Macintyre - 1999 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 191 (3):389-390.
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  • Dolphin Natures, Human Virtues: MacIntyre and Ethical Naturalism.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):292-297.
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  • Dolphin Natures, Human Virtues: Macintyre and Ethical Naturalism.Shane Nicholas Glackin - 2008 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 39 (3):292-297.
    Can biological facts explain human morality? Aristotelian ‘virtue’ ethics has traditionally assumed so. In recent years Alasdair MacIntyre has reintroduced a form of Aristotle’s ‘metaphysical biology’ into his ethics. He argues that the ethological study of dependence and rationality in other species—dolphins in particular—sheds light on how those same traits in the typical lives of humans give rise to the moral virtues. However, some goal-oriented dolphin behaviour appears both dependent and rational in the precise manner which impresses MacIntyre, yet anything (...)
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