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  1. Margaret Cavendish and the Exiles of the Mind.Anna Battigelli - 2000 - Utopian Studies 11 (1):139-142.
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  • Reason and Freedom: Margaret Cavendish on the Order and Disorder of Nature.Karen Detlefsen - 2007 - Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 89 (2):157-191.
    According to Margaret Cavendish the entire natural world is essentially rational such that everything thinks in some way or another. In this paper, I examine why Cavendish would believe that the natural world is ubiquitously rational, arguing against the usual account, which holds that she does so in order to account for the orderly production of very complex phenomena (e.g. living beings) given the limits of the mechanical philosophy. Rather, I argue, she attributes ubiquitous rationality to the natural world in (...)
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  • On the Genealogy of Color: A Case Study in Historicized Conceptual Analysis.Zed Adams - 2015 - Routledge.
    In On the Genealogy of Color , Zed Adams challenges widely held philosophical views about the nature of color, exploring the relevance of the history of color science for contemporary debates in color realism/anti-realism and philosophy of mind. Adams argues that the two sides of the contemporary debate on the problem of color realism, Cartesian anti-realism and Oxford realism, are both predicated on an assumption that the concept of color perception is ahistorical and unrevisable. Adams takes issue with this premise (...)
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  • Descartes on Life and Sense.Ann Wilbur Mackenzie - 1989 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 19 (2):163 - 192.
    My aim … is to show that the celestial machine is likened not to a kind of divine living being but rather to a clockwork. I consider the human body to be a machine … Although it may exaggerate to say that Descartes fathered the mechanization of biology, it is true that his Treatise of Man provided the first systematic development of the idea that a complete understanding of all the phenomena of life, including all abilities and behaviour of animals, (...)
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  • Mechanism and the Representational Nature of Sensation in Descartes.Laura Keating - 1999 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 29 (3):411-429.
    Commentators have argued that along with adopting a mechanical view of nature, Descartes developed two innovative views concerning sensation: sensation occurs without the involvement of an entity resembling the sensation, and sensations represent features of objects but without resembling them. When Descartes is interpreted as making both of these claims, it appears that in removing resemblance from the causal process of sensation, Descartes preserves the notion that sensations represent features of objects and that he does this by introducing a new (...)
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  • Descartes on Sensory Representation: A Study of theDioptrics.Ann Wilbur Mackenzie - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (sup1):109-147.
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  • Color Primitivism.Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert - 2006 - In Ralph Schumacher (ed.), Erkenntnis. Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 73 - 105.
    The realist preference for reductive theories of color over the last few decades is particularly striking in light of the generally anti-reductionist mood of recent philosophy of mind. The parallels between the mind-body problem and the case of color are substantial enough that the difference in trajectory is surprising. While dualism and non-.
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  • The Particularity and Phenomenology of Perceptual Experience.Susanna Schellenberg - 2010 - Philosophical Studies 149 (1):19-48.
    I argue that any account of perceptual experience should satisfy the following two desiderata. First, it should account for the particularity of perceptual experience, that is, it should account for the mind-independent object of an experience making a difference to individuating the experience. Second, it should explain the possibility that perceptual relations to distinct environments could yield subjectively indistinguishable experiences. Relational views of perceptual experience can easily satisfy the first but not the second desideratum. Representational views can easily satisfy the (...)
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  • Qualities.Samuel C. Rickless - 2018 - In Dan Kaufman (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Seventeenth Century Philosophy. New York, USA: Routledge. pp. 60-86.
    One of the more interesting philosophical debates in the seventeenth century concerned the nature and explanation of qualities. In order to understand these debates, it is important to place them in their proper historical-philosophical context. This book chapter starts with theoretical background in the work of Aristotle and the atomists, and then moves on to survey various theories of motion and rest, light, color, and sound, as well as the distinction between primary and secondary qualities, as represented in the work (...)
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  • How to Speak of the Colors.Mark Johnston - 1992 - Philosophical Studies 68 (3):221-263.
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  • Reliable Misrepresentation and Tracking Theories of Mental Representation.Angela Mendelovici - 2013 - Philosophical Studies 165 (2):421-443.
    It is a live possibility that certain of our experiences reliably misrepresent the world around us. I argue that tracking theories of mental representation have difficulty allowing for this possibility, and that this is a major consideration against them.
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  • Color Primitivism.David R. Hilbert & Alex Byrne - 2007 - Erkenntnis 66 (1-2):73 - 105.
    The typical kind of color realism is reductive: the color properties are identified with properties specified in other terms (as ways of altering light, for instance). If no reductive analysis is available — if the colors are primitive sui generis properties — this is often taken to be a convincing argument for eliminativism. That is, realist primitivism is usually thought to be untenable. The realist preference for reductive theories of color over the last few decades is particularly striking in light (...)
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  • De anima. ARISTOTLE - 1956 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 83:183.
    A complete translation of Aristotle’s classic work De Anima supplemented with well-chosen notes and a comprehensive introduction. Also commonly translated as On the Soul, this work is a seminal work from the roots of Classical thinking on the nature of life and the lifeforce. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were (...)
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  • An Essay Concerning Human Understanding.John Locke - 1979 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 169 (2):221-222.
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  • Physicalist Theories of Color.Paul A. Boghossian & J. David Velleman - 1991 - Philosophical Review 100 (January):67-106.
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  • Color as a Secondary Quality.Paul A. Boghossian & J. David Velleman - 1989 - Mind 98 (January):81-103.
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  • Empress Vs. Spider-Man: Margaret Cavendish on Pure and Applied Mathematics.Alison Peterman - 2019 - Synthese 196 (9):3527-3549.
    The empress of Margaret Cavendish’s The Blazing World dismisses pure mathematicians as a waste of her time, and declares of the applied mathematicians that “there [is] neither Truth nor Justice in their Profession”. In Cavendish’s theoretical work, she defends the Empress’ judgments. In this paper, I discuss Cavendish’s arguments against pure and applied mathematics. In Sect. 3, I develop an interpretation of some relevant parts of Cavendish’s metaphysics and epistemology, focusing on her anti-abstractionism and what I call her ’assimilation’ view (...)
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  • Margaret Cavendish on Motion and Mereology.Alison Peterman - 2019 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 57 (3):471-499.
    what is motion, according to Margaret Cavendish? There has been a groundswell of exciting work on Cavendish’s natural philosophy lately, all of which highlights her materialism, as well as the centrality of motion in her system.1 But none of it directly addresses this question in detail. Cavendish claims that motion grounds all qualitative and quantitative variety in matter, but we will not understand her explanations of natural phenomena if we do not know what motion is.In this paper, I argue that (...)
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  • Visual Perception as Patterning: Cavendish Against Hobbes on Sensation.Marcus P. Adams - 2016 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 33 (3):193-214.
    Many of Margaret Cavendish’s criticisms of Thomas Hobbes in the Philosophical Letters (1664) relate to the disorder and damage that she holds would result if Hobbesian pressure were the cause of visual perception. In this paper, I argue that her “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV is aimed at a different goal: to show the explanatory potency of her account. First, I connect Cavendish’s view of visual perception as “patterning” to the “two men” thought experiment in Letter IV. Second, (...)
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  • The Quest for Reality: Subjectivism and the Metaphysics of Colour.Barry Stroud - 2000 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (2):401-407.
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  • Descartes' Metaphysical Physics.Daniel Garber & Michael Friedman - 1992 - Synthese 106 (1):113-138.
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  • What Colors Could Not Be: An Argument for Color Primitivism.Joshua Gert - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (3):128-155.
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  • The Primary Quality View of Color.Frank Jackson - 1996 - Philosophical Perspectives 10:199-219.
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  • Colloquium 9.Christopher Shields - 1995 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 11 (1):307-330.
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  • The Role of the Concept of Sense in Principles IV, 189–98.Laura Keating - 2004 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 12 (2):199 – 222.
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  • Margaret Cavendish's Epistemology.Kourken Michaelian1 - 2009 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):31 – 53.
    This paper provides a systematic reconstruction of Cavendish's general epistemology and a characterization of the fundamental role of that theory in her natural philosophy. After reviewing the outlines of her natural philosophy, I describe her treatment of 'exterior knowledge', i.e. of perception in general and of sense perception in particular. I then describe her treatment of 'interior knowledge', i.e. of self-knowledge and 'conception'. I conclude by drawing out some implications of this reconstruction for our developing understanding of Cavendish's natural philosophy.
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  • Mechanism, Resemblance and Secondary Qualities: From Descartes to Locke.Keith Allen - 2008 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (2):273 – 291.
    Locke’s argument for the primary-secondary quality distinction is compared with Descartes’s argument (in the Principles of Philosophy) for the distinction between mechanical modifications and sensible qualities. I argue that following Descartes, Locke’s argument for the primary-secondary quality distinction is an essentially a priori argument, based on our conception of substance, and the constraints on intelligible bodily interaction that this conception of substance sets.
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  • Color Realism and Color Science.Alex Byrne & David R. Hilbert - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):3-21.
    The target article is an attempt to make some progress on the problem of color realism. Are objects colored? And what is the nature of the color properties? We defend the view that physical objects (for instance, tomatoes, radishes, and rubies) are colored, and that colors are physical properties, specifically types of reflectance. This is probably a minority opinion, at least among color scientists. Textbooks frequently claim that physical objects are not colored, and that the colors are "subjective" or "in (...)
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  • Color Properties and Color Ascriptions: A Relationalist Manifesto.Jonathan Cohen - 2004 - Philosophical Review 113 (4):451-506.
    Are colors relational or non-relational properties of their bearers? Is red a property that is instantiated by all and only the objects with a certain intrinsic (/non-relational) nature? Or does an object with a particular intrinsic (/non-relational) nature count as red only in virtue of standing in certain relations - for example, only when it looks a certain way to a certain perceiver, or only in certain circumstances of observation? In this paper I shall argue for the view that color (...)
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  • Debating Materialism: Cavendish, Hobbes, and More.Stewart Duncan - 2012 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (4):391-409.
    This paper discusses the materialist views of Margaret Cavendish, focusing on the relationships between her views and those of two of her contemporaries, Thomas Hobbes and Henry More. It argues for two main claims. First, Cavendish's views sit, often rather neatly, between those of Hobbes and More. She agreed with Hobbes on some issues and More on others, while carving out a distinctive alternative view. Secondly, the exchange between Hobbes, More, and Cavendish illustrates a more general puzzle about just what (...)
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  • Berkeley on the Mind-Dependence of Colors.Margaret D. Wilson - 1987 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 68 (3/4):249-264.
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  • Consciousness, Color, and Content.Michael Tye - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 68 (1):245-247.
    In 1995, in my book, Ten Problems of Consciousness, I proposed a version of the theory of phenomenal consciousness now known as representationalism. The present book, in part, consists of a further development of that theory along with replies to common objections. It is also concerned with two prominent challenges for any reductive theory of consciousness: the explanatory gap and the knowledge argument. In addition, it connects representationalism with two more general issues: the nature of color and the location of (...)
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  • The Legacy of Margaret Cavendish.Eric Lewis - 2001 - Perspectives on Science 9 (3):341-365.
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  • XIII—Descartes on Colour.John Cottingham - 1990 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 90 (1):231-246.
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  • Descartes on Mind-Body Interaction: What's the Problem?Marleen Rozemond - 1999 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 37 (3):435-467.
    I argue that Descartes treated the action of body on mind differently from the action of mind on body, as was common in the period. Descartes explicitly denied that there is a problem for interaction but his descriptions of interaction seem to suggest that he thought there was a problem. I argue that these descriptions are motivated by a different issue, the seemingly arbitrary connections between particular physical states and the particular mental states they produce. Within scholasticism there was already (...)
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  • Hobbes's Causal Account of Sensation.Jeffrey Barnouw - 1980 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (2):115-130.
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  • Descartes and the Meditations.G. Dicker - 2005 - Philosophical Review 114 (1):122-125.
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  • XIII—The Names of Secondary Qualities.Peter Alexander - 1977 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 77 (1):203-220.
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  • Descartes's Causal Likeness Principle.Kenneth C. Clatterbaugh - 1980 - Philosophical Review 89 (3):379-402.
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  • The Headless Woman Illusion and the Defence of Materialism.David Malet Armstrong - 1968 - Analysis 29 (2):48--9.
    The paper tries to rebut an objection to materialism. Anti-Materialists have argued that mental processes do not appear to be mere physical processes in the brain, And that secondary qualities such as sounds do not appear to be mere vibrations in the air. So materialists must admit that introspection and perception involve at least the illusion of the falsity of materialism. Using the headless woman illusion as a model, It is shown how the illusion is generated, And that it is (...)
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  • Descartes on Sensible Qualities.Jill Vance Buroker - 1991 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 29 (4):585-611.
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  • History of Philosophy in Philosophy Today; and the Case of the Sensible Qualities.Margaret D. Wilson - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (1):191-243.
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  • Observations Upon Experimental Philosophy.Margaret Cavendish & Eileen O'neill - 2004 - Philosophical Quarterly 54 (214):175-177.
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  • The Philosophical Innovations of Margaret Cavendish.Susan James - 1999 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 7 (2):219 – 244.
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  • Atomism, Monism, and Causation in the Natural Philosophy of Margaret Cavendish.Karen Detlefsen - 2006 - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy 3:199-240.
    Between 1653 and 1655 Margaret Cavendish makes a radical transition in her theory of matter, rejecting her earlier atomism in favour of an infinitely-extended and infinitely-divisible material plenum, with matter being ubiquitously self-moving, sensing, and rational. It is unclear, however, if Cavendish can actually dispense of atomism. One of her arguments against atomism, for example, depends upon the created world being harmonious and orderly, a premise Cavendish herself repeatedly undermines by noting nature’s many disorders. I argue that her supposed difficulties (...)
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  • Cartesian Consciousness Reconsidered.Alison Simmons - 2012 - Philosophers' Imprint 12.
    Descartes revolutionized our conception of the mind by identifying consciousness as the mark of the mental: all and only thoughts are conscious. Today the idea that all thoughts are conscious seems obviously wrong. Worse, however, Descartes himself seems to posit a whole host of unconscious thoughts. Something is not as it seems. Either Descartes is remarkably inconsistent, or his claim that all thought is conscious is more nuanced than it appears. In this paper I argue that while Descartes was indeed (...)
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  • Can There Be Colors in the Dark? Physical Color Theory Before Newton.Henry Guerlac - 1986 - Journal of the History of Ideas 47 (1):3.
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  • Of Primary and Secondary Qualities.A. D. Smith - 1990 - Philosophical Review 99 (2):221-254.
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  • Leviathan or the Matter, Forme and Power of a Commonwealth, Ecclesiasticall and Civil.Thomas Hobbes & Michael Oakeshott - 1948 - Philosophy 23 (85):176-177.
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  • Theories of Light From Descartes to Newton.A. I. Sabra - 1971 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 22 (1):55-57.
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