Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Morals by Agreement.David Gauthier - 1986 - Oxford University Press.
    Is morality rational? In this book Gauthier argues that moral principles are principles of rational choice. He proposes a principle whereby choice is made on an agreed basis of cooperation, rather than according to what would give an individual the greatest expectation of value. He shows that such a principle not only ensures mutual benefit and fairness, thus satisfying the standards of morality, but also that each person may actually expect greater utility by adhering to morality, even though the choice (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   342 citations  
  • Morality, Normativity, and Society.David Copp - 1995 - Oxford University Press.
    Moral claims not only purport to be true, they also purport to guide our choices. This book presents a new theory of normative judgment, the "standard-based theory," which offers a schematic account of the truth conditions of normative propositions of all kinds, including moral propositions and propositions about reasons. The heart of Copp 's approach to moral propositions is a theory of the circumstances under which corresponding moral standards qualify as justified, the " society -centered theory." He argues that because (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   36 citations  
  • The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory.David Copp (ed.) - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory is a major new reference work in ethical theory consisting of commissioned essays by leading moral philosophers. Ethical theories have always been of central importance to philosophy, and remain so; ethical theory is one of the most active areas of philosophical research and teaching today. Courses in ethics are taught in colleges and universities at all levels, and ethical theory is the organizing principle for all of them. The Handbook is divided into two parts, (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Morals by Agreement.Richmond Campbell - 1986 - Philosophical Quarterly 38 (152):343-364.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   147 citations  
  • Morals by Agreement.David Copp - 1986 - Philosophical Review 98 (3):411-414.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   78 citations  
  • Natural Law Modernized.M. C. Murphy - 2003 - Philosophical Quarterly 53 (213):628-630.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Morality, Normativity, and Society.Walter Sinnott-Armstrong - 1996 - Philosophical Review 105 (4):552.
    A complete moral theory should combine substantive ethics with metaethics, including moral semantics, moral epistemology, moral ontology, moral psychology, and the definition of morality. All of these topics and more are discussed with great clarity, insight, and originality in Copp’s remarkable book. Some of Copp’s positions are known from earlier articles, but his book reveals interconnections that increase the plausibility of each view separately and of the structure as a whole.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Morality, Normativity, and Society.Richmond Campbell - 1997 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):423-444.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Wrong Answer to an Improper Question?David Copp - 2007 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (sup1):97-130.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Critical Notice.Richmond Campbell - 1997 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):423-444.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Wrong Answer to an Improper Question?David Copp - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Supplementary Volume 33:pp. 97-130.
    A philosopher who asks “Why be moral?” is asking a theoretical question about the force of moral reasons or about the normative status of morality. Two questions need to be distinguished. First, assuming that there is a morally preferred way to live or to be, is there any (further) reason to be this way or to act this way? Second, if moral considerations are a source of reasons, why is this, and what is the significance of these reasons? This question (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Morality, Normativity, and Society.David Copp - 1995 - Mind 109 (434):330-334.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Antirealist Expressivism and Quasi-Realism.Simon Blackburn - 2006 - In David Copp (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 146--162.
    Expressivism is the view that the function of normative sentences is not to represent a kind of fact, but to avow attitudes, prescribe behavior, or the like. The idea can be found in David Hume. In the 20th century, G.E. Moore’s Open Question Argument provided important support for the view. Elizabeth Anscombe introduced the notion of “direction of fit,” which helped distinguish expressivism from a kind of naive subjectivism. The central advantage of expressivism is that it easily explains the motivational (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • The Normativity of Self-Grounded Reason.David Copp - 2005 - Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2):165-203.
    In this essay, I propose a standard of practical rationality and a grounding for the standard that rests on the idea of autonomous agency. This grounding is intended to explain the “normativity” of the standard. The basic idea is this: To be autonomous is to be self-governing. To be rational is at least in part to be self-governing; it is to do well in governing oneself. I argue that a person's values are aspects of her identity—of her “self-esteem identity”—in a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Selected Philosophical Writings.Thomas Aquinas - 2008 - Oxford University Press.
    St Thomas Aquinas saw religion as part of the natural human propensity to worship. His ability to recognize the naturalness of this phenomenon and simultaneously to go beyond it, to explore spiritual revelation, makes his work fresh and highly readable today. While drawing on a strong distinction between theology and philosophy, Aquinas interleaved them intricately in his writings, which range from an examination of the structures of thought to the concept of God as the end of all things. This accessible (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Does Moral Theory Need the Concept of Society?David Copp - 1997 - Analyse & Kritik 19 (2):189-212.
    We have the intuition that the function of morality is to make society possible. That is, the function of morality is to make possible the kind of cooperation and coordination among people that is necessary for societies to exist and to cope with their problems. This intuition is reflected in the 'society centered' moral theory I defended in my book "Morality, Normativity, and Society". The theory is a relativistic version of moral naturalism and moral realism. This paper briefly explains some (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Morality in a Natural World: Selected Essays in Metaethics.David Copp - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    The central philosophical challenge of metaethics is to account for the normativity of moral judgment without abandoning or seriously compromising moral realism. In Morality in a Natural World, David Copp defends a version of naturalistic moral realism that can accommodate the normativity of morality. Moral naturalism is often thought to face special metaphysical, epistemological, and semantic problems as well as the difficulty in accounting for normativity. In the ten essays included in this volume, Copp defends solutions to these problems. Three (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  • The Idea of a Legitimate State.David Copp - 1999 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 28 (1):3-45.
    A legitimate state would have a right to rule. The problem is to understand, first, precisely what this right amounts to, and second, under what conditions a state would have it. According to the traditional account, the legitimacy of a state is to be explained in terms of its subjects’ obligation to obey the law. I argue that this account is inadequate. I propose that the legitimacy of a state would consist in its having a bundle of rights of various (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   38 citations  
  • Introduction: Metaethics and Normative Ethics.David Copp - 2006 - In The Oxford Handbook of Ethical Theory. Oxford University Press. pp. 3--35.
    This chapter begins by explaining the distinction between meta-ethics and normative ethics. It then introduces the main issues in the two fields and provides a critical overview of the chapters in the volume. In meta-ethics, it focuses on explaining the different kinds of moral realism and anti-realism, including the divine command theory, naturalism, non-naturalism, relativism, nihilism, and non-cognitivism. Quasi-realism illustrates how the distinction between anti-realism and realism can become blurred. A variety of views about the relation between morality and practical (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations