Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Metaethics in Context of Engineering Ethical and Moral Systems.Michal Klincewicz & Lily Frank - 2016 - In AAAI Spring Series Technical Reports. Palo Alto, CA, USA: AAAI Press.
    It is not clear to what the projects of creating an artificial intelligence (AI) that does ethics, is moral, or makes moral judgments amounts. In this paper we discuss some of the extant metaethical theories and debates in moral philosophy by which such projects should be informed, specifically focusing on the project of creating an AI that makes moral judgments. We argue that the scope and aims of that project depend a great deal on antecedent metaethical commitments. Metaethics, therefore, plays (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Plea for Anti-Anti-Individualism: How Oversimple Psychology Misleads Social Policy.Alex Madva - 2016 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 3:701-728.
    This essay responds to the criticism that contemporary efforts to redress discrimination and inequality are overly individualistic. Critics of individualism emphasize that these systemic social ills stem not from the prejudice, irrationality, or selfishness of individuals, but from underlying structural-institutional forces. They are skeptical, therefore, of attempts to change individuals’ attitudes while leaving structural problems intact. I argue that the insistence on prioritizing structural over individual change is problematic and misleading. My view is not that we should instead prioritize individual (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Love as Valuing a Relationship.Niko Kolodny - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):135-189.
    At first glance, love seems to be a psychological state for which there are normative reasons: a state that, if all goes well, is an appropriate or fitting response to something independent of itself. Love for one’s parent, child, or friend is fitting, one wants to say, if anything is. On reflection, however, it is elusive what reasons for love might be. It is natural to assume that they would be nonrelational features of the person one loves, something about her (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   155 citations  
  • Love as Valuing a Relationship.Niko Kolodny - 2003 - Philosophical Review 112 (2):135-189.
    At first glance, love seems to be a psychological state for which there are normative reasons: a state that, if all goes well, is an appropriate or fitting response to something independent of itself. Love for one’s parent, child, or friend is fitting, one wants to say, if anything is. On reflection, however, it is elusive what reasons for love might be. It is natural to assume that they would be nonrelational features of the person one loves, something about her (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   88 citations  
  • A New Look at Habits and the Habit-Goal Interface.Wendy Wood & David T. Neal - 2007 - Psychological Review 114 (4):843-863.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  • Pornographic Subordination, Power, and Feminist Alternatives.Matt L. Drabek - 2016 - Feminist Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):1-19.
    How does pornography subordinate on the basis of gender? I provide part of an answer in this paper by framing subordination as something that works through everyday classification. Under certain material and social conditions, pornography classifies people through labeling them in ways that connect to structures of oppression. I hope to show two things. First, pornographic content is not the major driving force behind pornography’s subordination of women. Second, pornography, when repurposed in new ways, carries the potential to counter the (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Love Troubles: Human Attachment and Biomedical Enhancements.Sven Nyholm - 2014 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 31 (2):190-202.
    In fascinating recent work, Julian Savulescu and his various co-authors argue that human love is one of the things we can improve upon using biomedical enhancements. Is that so? This article first notes that Savulescu and his co-authors mainly treat love as a means to various other goods. Love, however, is widely regarded as an intrinsic good. To investigate whether enhancements can produce the distinctive intrinsic good of love, this article does three things. Drawing on Philip Pettit's recent discussion of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Real‐World Love Drugs: Reply to Nyholm.Hichem Naar - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):197-201.
    In a recent article, Sven Nyholm argues that the use of biomedical enhancements in our romantic relationships would fail to secure the final value we attribute to love. On Nyholm's view, one thing we desire for its own sake is to be at the origin of the love others have for us. The satisfaction of this desire, he argues, is incompatible with the use of BE insofar as they are responsible for the attachment characteristic of love. In particular, the use (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Love Troubles: Human Attachment and Biomedical Enhancements.Sven Nyholm - 2015 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (2):190-202.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Technics and Civilization. [REVIEW]H. A. L. - 1934 - Journal of Philosophy 31 (12):331-332.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   77 citations  
  • What Love Is: And What It Could Be.Carrie S. I. Jenkins - 2017 - Basic Books.
    This book unpicks the conceptual, ideological, and metaphysical tangles that get in the way of understanding romantic love. -/- Written for a general audience, What Love Is And What It Could Be explores different disciplinary perspectives on love, in search of the bigger picture. It presents a "dual-nature" theory: romantic love is simultaneously both a biological phenomenon and a social construct. The key philosophical insight comes in explaining why this a coherent—and indeed a necessary—position to take. -/- The deep motivation (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Robust Demands of the Good: Ethics with Attachment, Virtue, and Respect.Philip Pettit - 2015 - Oxford University Press.
    Philip Pettit offers a new insight into moral psychology. He shows that attachments such as love, and certain virtues such as honesty, require their characteristic behaviours not only as things actually are, but also in cases where things are different from how they actually are. He explores the implications of this idea for key moral issues.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • The Transparent Self.Marjolein Lanzing - 2016 - Ethics and Information Technology 18 (1):9-16.
    This paper critically engages with new self-tracking technologies. In particular, it focuses on a conceptual tension between the idea that disclosing personal information increases one’s autonomy and the idea that informational privacy is a condition for autonomous personhood. I argue that while self-tracking may sometimes prove to be an adequate method to shed light on particular aspects of oneself and can be used to strengthen one’s autonomy, self-tracking technologies often cancel out these benefits by exposing too much about oneself to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • .Julian Savulescu - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  • If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup.Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):3-17.
    ?Love hurts??as the saying goes?and a certain amount of pain and difficulty in intimate relationships is unavoidable. Sometimes it may even be beneficial, since adversity can lead to personal growth, self-discovery, and a range of other components of a life well-lived. But other times, love can be downright dangerous. It may bind a spouse to her domestic abuser, draw an unscrupulous adult toward sexual involvement with a child, put someone under the insidious spell of a cult leader, and even inspire (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • Should We Campaign Against Sex Robots?John Danaher, Brian D. Earp & Anders Sandberg - 2017 - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    In September 2015 a well-publicised Campaign Against Sex Robots (CASR) was launched. Modelled on the longer-standing Campaign to Stop Killer Robots, the CASR opposes the development of sex robots on the grounds that the technology is being developed with a particular model of female-male relations (the prostitute-john model) in mind, and that this will prove harmful in various ways. In this chapter, we consider carefully the merits of campaigning against such a technology. We make three main arguments. First, we argue (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • From Sex Robots to Love Robots: Is Mutual Love with a Robot Possible?Sven Nyholm & Lily Frank - forthcoming - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Robot Sex: Social Implications and Ethical. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    Some critics of sex-robots worry that their use might spread objectifying attitudes about sex, and common sense places a higher value on sex within love-relationships than on casual sex. If there could be mutual love between humans and sex-robots, this could help to ease the worries about objectifying attitudes. And mutual love between humans and sex-robots, if possible, could also help to make this sex more valuable. But is mutual love between humans and robots possible, or even conceivable? We discuss (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Hypoactive Sexual Desire Disorder: Inventing a Disease to Sell Low Libido.Antonie Meixel, Elena Yanchar & Adriane Fugh-Berman - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (10):859-862.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The Best Argument Against Kidney Sales Fails.Luke Semrau - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (6):443-446.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • When is Diminishment a Form of Enhancement? : Rethinking the Enhancement Debate in Biomedical Ethics.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg, Guy Kahane & Julian Savulescu - unknown
    The enhancement debate in neuroscience and biomedical ethics tends to focus on the augmentation of certain capacities or functions: memory, learning, attention, and the like. Typically, the point of contention is whether these augmentative enhancements should be considered permissible for individuals with no particular “medical” disadvantage along any of the dimensions of interest. Less frequently addressed in the literature, however, is the fact that sometimes the _diminishment_ of a capacity or function, under the right set of circumstances, could plausibly contribute (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • The Symbolic-Consequences Argument in the Sex Robot Debate.John Danaher - 2017 - In John Danaher & Neil McArthur (eds.), Robot Sex: Social and Ethical Implications. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    This chapter examines a common objection to sex robots: the symbolic-consequences argument. According to this argument sex robots are problematic because they symbolise something disturbing about our attitude to sex-related norms such as consent and the status of our sex partners, and because of the potential consequences of this symbolism. After formalising this objection and considering several real-world uses of it, the chapter subjects it to critical scrutiny. It argues that while there are grounds for thinking that sex robots could (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • The Reversal Test: Eliminating Status Quo Bias in Applied Ethics.Nick Bostrom & Toby Ord - 2006 - Ethics 116 (4):656-679.
    Suppose that we develop a medically safe and affordable means of enhancing human intelligence. For concreteness, we shall assume that the technology is genetic engineering (either somatic or germ line), although the argument we will present does not depend on the technological implementation. For simplicity, we shall speak of enhancing “intelligence” or “cognitive capacity,” but we do not presuppose that intelligence is best conceived of as a unitary attribute. Our considerations could be applied to specific cognitive abilities such as verbal (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   85 citations  
  • Natural Selection, Childrearing, and the Ethics of Marriage (and Divorce): Building a Case for the Neuroenhancement of Human Relationships. [REVIEW]Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2012 - Philosophy and Technology 25 (4):561-587.
    We argue that the fragility of contemporary marriages—and the corresponding high rates of divorce—can be explained (in large part) by a three-part mismatch: between our relationship values, our evolved psychobiological natures, and our modern social, physical, and technological environment. “Love drugs” could help address this mismatch by boosting our psychobiologies while keeping our values and our environment intact. While individual couples should be free to use pharmacological interventions to sustain and improve their romantic connection, we suggest that they may have (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   26 citations  
  • The Medicalization of Love.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):323-336.
    Pharmaceuticals or other emerging technologies could be used to enhance (or diminish) feelings of lust, attraction, and attachment in adult romantic partnerships. While such interventions could conceivably be used to promote individual (and couple) well-being, their widespread development and/or adoption might lead to “medicalization” of human love and heartache—for some, a source of serious concern. In this essay, we argue that the “medicalization of love” need not necessarily be problematic, on balance, but could plausibly be expected to have either good (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   27 citations  
  • Social Science and Social Pathology.Barbara Wootton - 1959 - Philosophy 37 (140):165-175.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • The Medicalization of Love.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2016 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 25 (4):759-771.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Swiping Left on the Quantified Relationship: Exploring the Potential Soft Impacts.Lily Frank & Michał Klincewicz - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (2):27-28.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Anti-Love Biotechnologies: Integrating Considerations of the Social.Kristina Gupta - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (11):18-19.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Medicalization of Love and Narrow and Broad Conceptions of Human Well-Being.Sven Nyholm - 2015 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 24 (3):337-346.
    Would a “medicalization” of love be a “good” or “bad” form of medicalization? In discussing this question, Earp, Sandberg, and Savulescu primarily focus on the potential positive and negative consequences of turning love into a medical issue. But it can also be asked whether there is something intrinsically regrettable about medicalizing love. It is argued here that the medicalization of love can be seen as an “evaluative category mistake”: it treats a core human value as if it were mainly a (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Markets Without Symbolic Limits.Jason Brennan & Peter Martin Jaworski - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1053-1077.
    Semiotic objections to commodification hold that buying and selling certain goods and services is wrong because of what market exchange communicates or because it violates the meaning of certain goods, services, and relationships. We argue that such objections fail. The meaning of markets and of money is a contingent, socially constructed fact. Cultures often impute meaning to markets in harmful, socially destructive, or costly ways. Rather than semiotic objections giving us reason to judge certain markets as immoral, the usefulness of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Happiness, Cerebroscopes and Incorrigibility: Prospects for Neuroeudaimonia.Stephanie M. Hare & Nicole A. Vincent - 2016 - Neuroethics 9 (1):69-84.
    Suppose you want to live a happy life. Who should you turn to for advice? We normally think that we know best about our own happiness. But recent work in psychology and neuroscience suggests that we are often mistaken about our own natures, and that sometimes scientists know us better than we know ourselves. Does this mean that to live a happy life we should ask scientists for advice rather than relying on our introspection? In what follows, we highlight ways (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Brave New Love: The Threat of High-Tech “Conversion” Therapy and the Bio-Oppression of Sexual Minorities.Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (1):4-12.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Protecting Sexual Diversity: Rethinking the Use of Neurotechnological Interventions to Alter Sexuality.Kristina Gupta - 2012 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 3 (3):24-28.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • E. San Juan, Jr, Beyond Postcolonial Theory.C. Lupton - forthcoming - Radical Philosophy.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation