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  1. Petitionary Prayer.Scott A. Davison - 2008 - In Thomas P. Flint & Michael C. Rea (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophical Theology. Oxford University Press.
    Traditional theists believe that there exists an all-knowing, all-powerful, perfectly loving, and perfectly good God. They also believe that God created the world, sustains it in being from moment to moment, and providentially guides all events, in accordance with a plan, towards a good ending. Historically, most traditional theists have believed that God sometimes answers prayers for particular things. In keeping with the literature on this subject, these prayers are referred to as ‘petitionary prayers’. This article discusses several problems related (...)
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  • Is Petitionary Prayer Superfluous?Isaac Choi - 2016 - Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 7:32-62.
    Why would God institute the practice of efficacious petitionary prayer? Why would God not simply give us what we need before we ask? I examine recently proposed solutions to this puzzle and argue that they are inadequate to explain why an omniscient and perfectly good God would act differently in response to prayer. I propose that God has reasons to not always maximize a creature’s good, even in a sinless world, and that petitionary prayer functions as a means to reward (...)
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  • Sharing Responsibility.Michael J. Zimmerman - 1985 - American Philosophical Quarterly 22 (2):115 - 122.
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  • Dretske on the Metaphysics of Freedom.Scott A. Davison - 1994 - Analysis 54 (2):115-123.
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  • Moral Luck and the Flicker of Freedom.Scott A. Davison - 1999 - American Philosophical Quarterly 36 (3):241 - 251.
    I argue that a well-known argument concerning moral luck supports something like the Principle of Alternate Possibilities (PAP), despite the attacks on PAP by Harry Frankfurt and John Martin Fischer.
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