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  1. Peirce's Interpretant.James Jakób Liszka - 1990 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 26 (1):17 - 62.
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  • From Biology to Consciousness to Morality.Ursula Goodenough & Terrence W. Deacon - 2003 - Zygon 38 (4):801-819.
    Social animals are provisioned with pro-social orientations that transcend self-interest. Morality, as used here, describes human versions of such orientations. We explore the evolutionary antecedents of morality in the context of emergentism, giving considerable attention to the biological traits that undergird emergent human forms of mind. We suggest that our moral frames of mind emerge from our primate pro-social capacities, transfigured and valenced by our symbolic languages, cultures, and religions.
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  • Syntactic Structures.Noam Chomsky - 1957 - Mouton.
    Noam Chomsky's book on syntactic structures is a serious attempts on the part of a linguist to construct within the tradition of scientific theory-construction ...
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  • Peirce and Pragmatism.W. B. Gallie - 1952 - Greenwood Press.
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  • Knowledge of Language.Noam Chomsky - 1986 - Prager.
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  • Interpreting Peirce's Interpretant: A Response To Lalor, Liszka, and Meyers.T. L. Short - 1996 - Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 32 (4):488 - 541.
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  • The Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or, the Preservation of Favored Races in the Struggle for Life.Charles Darwin - 1993 - Modern Library.
    Perhaps the most readable and accessible of the great works of scientific imagination, The Origin of Species sold out on the day it was published in 1859. Theologians quickly labeled Charles Darwin the most dangerous man in England, and, as the Saturday Review noted, the uproar over the book quickly "passed beyond the bounds of the study and lecture-room into the drawing-room and the public street." Yet, after reading it, Darwin's friend and colleague T. H. Huxley had a different reaction: (...)
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