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  1. Anthropomorphism and Anthropodenial.Frans B. M. De Waal - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (1):255-280.
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  • Anthropomorphism and Anthropodenial: Consistency in Our Thinking About Humans and Other Animals.Frans B. M. de Waal - 1999 - Philosophical Topics 27 (1):255-280.
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  • Morgan’s Canon, Meet Hume’s Dictum: Avoiding Anthropofabulation in Cross-Species Comparisons.Cameron Buckner - 2013 - Biology and Philosophy 28 (5):853-871.
    How should we determine the distribution of psychological traits—such as Theory of Mind, episodic memory, and metacognition—throughout the Animal kingdom? Researchers have long worried about the distorting effects of anthropomorphic bias on this comparative project. A purported corrective against this bias was offered as a cornerstone of comparative psychology by C. Lloyd Morgan in his famous “Canon”. Also dangerous, however, is a distinct bias that loads the deck against animal mentality: our tendency to tie the competence criteria for cognitive capacities (...)
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  • Insects and the Problem of Simple Minds: Are Bees Natural Zombies?Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (8): 389-415.
    This paper explores the idea that many “simple minded” invertebrates are “natural zombies” in that they utilize their senses in intelligent ways, but without phenomenal awareness. The discussion considers how “first-order” representationalist theories of consciousness meet the explanatory challenge posed by blindsight. It would be an advantage of first-order representationalism, over higher-order versions, if it does not rule out consciousness in most non-human animals. However, it is argued that a first-order representationalism which adequately accounts for blindsight also implies that most (...)
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  • Insects and the Problem of Simple Minds: Are Bees Natural Zombies?Sean Allen-Hermanson - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy 105 (8):389-415.
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  • The Role of Ontogeny in the Evolution of Human Cooperation.Michael Tomasello & Ivan Gonzalez-Cabrera - 2017 - Human Nature 28 (3):274–288.
    To explain the evolutionary emergence of uniquely human skills and motivations for cooperation, Tomasello et al. (2012, in Current Anthropology 53(6):673–92) proposed the interdependence hypothesis. The key adaptive context in this account was the obligate collaborative foraging of early human adults. Hawkes (2014, in Human Nature 25(1):28–48), following Hrdy (Mothers and Others, Harvard University Press, 2009), provided an alternative account for the emergence of uniquely human cooperative skills in which the key was early human infants’ attempts to solicit care and (...)
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  • Is Anyone a Cognitive Ethologist?Colin Allen - 2004 - Biology and Philosophy 19 (4):589-607.
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  • The Structure of Scientific Revolutions.David Bohm - 1964 - Philosophical Quarterly 14 (57):377-379.
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  • The Anthropological Difference: What Can Philosophers Do To Identify the Differences Between Human and Non-Human Animals?Hans-Johann Glock - 2012 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 70:105-131.
    This paper considers the question of whether there is a human-animal or ‘anthropological difference'. It starts with a historical introduction to the project of philosophical anthropology. Section 2 explains the philosophical quest for an anthropological difference. Sections 3-4 are methodological and explain how philosophical anthropology should be pursued in my view, namely as impure conceptual analysis. The following two sections discuss two fundamental objections to the very idea of such a difference, biological continuity and Darwinist anti-essentialism. Section 7 discusses various (...)
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  • Darwin and the Emergence of Evolutionary Theories of Mind and Behavior.Daniel C. Dennett - 1989 - Philosophy of Science 56 (3):540-543.
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  • Narratives, Mechanisms and Progress in Historical Science.Adrian Mitchell Currie - 2014 - Synthese 191 (6):1-21.
    Geologists, Paleontologists and other historical scientists are frequently concerned with narrative explanations targeting single cases. I show that two distinct explanatory strategies are employed in narratives, simple and complex. A simple narrative has minimal causal detail and is embedded in a regularity, whereas a complex narrative is more detailed and not embedded. The distinction is illustrated through two case studies: the ‘snowball earth’ explanation of Neoproterozoic glaciation and recent attempts to explain gigantism in Sauropods. This distinction is revelatory of historical (...)
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  • Telling the Tree: Narrative Representation and the Study of Evolutionary History.Robert J. O'Hara - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (2): 135–160.
    Accounts of the evolutionary past have as much in common with works of narrative history as they do with works of science. Awareness of the narrative character of evolutionary writing leads to the discovery of a host of fascinating and hitherto unrecognized problems in the representation of evolutionary history, problems associated with the writing of narrative. These problems include selective attention, narrative perspective, foregrounding and backgrounding, differential resolution, and the establishment of a canon of important events. The narrative aspects of (...)
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  • Understanding and Sharing Intentions: The Origins of Cultural Cognition.Michael Tomasello, Malinda Carpenter, Josep Call, Tanya Behne & Henrike Moll - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):675-691.
    We propose that the crucial difference between human cognition and that of other species is the ability to participate with others in collaborative activities with shared goals and intentions: shared intentionality. Participation in such activities requires not only especially powerful forms of intention reading and cultural learning, but also a unique motivation to share psychological states with others and unique forms of cognitive representation for doing so. The result of participating in these activities is species-unique forms of cultural cognition and (...)
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  • In Defence of Story-Telling.Adrian Currie & Kim Sterelny - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 62:14-21.
    We argue that narratives are central to the success of historical reconstruction. Narrative explanation involves tracing causal trajectories across time. The construction of narrative, then, often involves postulating relatively speculative causal connections between comparatively well-established events. But speculation is not always idle or harmful: it also aids in overcoming local underdetermination by forming scaffolds from which new evidence becomes relevant. Moreover, as our understanding of the past’s causal milieus become richer, the constraints on narrative plausibility become increasingly strict: a narrative’s (...)
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  • The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals.CHARLES DARWIN - 1955
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  • Semiotics in the United States.Thomas A. SEBEOK - 1991
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  • Identifying the Motivations of Chimpanzees: Culture and Collaboration.Victoria Horner, Kristin E. Bonnie & Frans B. M. de Waal - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):704-705.
    Tomasello et al. propose that shared intentionality is a uniquely human ability. In light of this, we discuss several cultural behaviors that seem to result from a motivation to share experiences with others, suggest evidence for coordination and collaboration among chimpanzees, and cite recent findings that counter the argument that the predominance of emulation in chimpanzees reflects a deficit in intention reading.
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  • From the Hiatus Model to the Diffuse Discontinuities: A Turning Point in Human-Animal Studies.Carlo Brentari - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3):331-345.
    In twentieth-century continental philosophy, German philosophical anthropology can be seen as a sort of conceptual laboratory devoted to human/animal research, and, in particular, to the discontinuity between human and non-human animals. Its main notion—the idea of the special position of humans in nature—is one of the first philosophical attempts to think of the specificity of humans as a natural and qualitative difference from non-human animals. This school of thought correctly rejects both the metaphysical and/or religious characterisations of humans, and the (...)
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  • Cat Cultures and Threefold Modelling of Human-Animal Interactions: On the Example of Estonian Cat Shelters.Filip Jaroš - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (3):365-386.
    Interaction between humans and cats in urban environments is subject to dynamic change. Based on the frequency and quality of relations with humans, we can distinguish several populations of domestic cats : pedigree, pet, semi-feral, feral, and pseudo-wild. Bringing together theoretical perspectives of the Tartu school of biosemiotics and ethological studies of animal societies, we distinguish two basic types of cat cultures: the culture of street cats and the humano-cat culture of pets. The difference between these cultures is documented on (...)
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  • Human-Like Social Skills in Dogs?Brian Hare & Michael Tomasello - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (9):439-444.
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  • Cats and Human Societies: A World of Interspecific Interaction and Interpretation.Filip Jaroš - 2016 - Biosemiotics 9 (2):287-306.
    This article focuses on the social structure of domestic cat colonies, and on the various ways these are represented in ethological literature. Our analysis begins with detailed accounts of different forms of cat societies from the works of Leyhausen, Tabor, and Alger and Alger, and then puts these descriptions into a broader epistemological perspective. The analysis is inspired by the bi-constructivist approach to ethological studies formulated by Lestel, which highlights the position of the ethologist in the constitution of particular animal (...)
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  • Essentially Narrative Explanations.Paul A. Roth - 2017 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 62:42-50.
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  • Contrasting the Social Cognition of Humans and Nonhuman Apes: The Shared Intentionality Hypothesis.Josep Call - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (2):368-379.
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  • Towards a Bottom-Up Perspective on Animal and Human Cognition.Frans B. M. de Waal & Pier Francesco Ferrari - 2010 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 14 (5):201-207.
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  • Umwelt and Ape Language Experiments: On the Role of Iconicity in the Human-Ape Pidgin Language.Mirko Cerrone - 2018 - Biosemiotics 11 (1):41-63.
    Several language experiments have been carried out on apes and other animals aiming to narrow down the presumed qualitative gap that separates humans from other animals. These experiments, however, have been driven by the understanding of language as a purely symbolic sign system, often connected to a profound disinterest for language use in real situations and a propensity to perceive grammatical and syntactic information as the only fundamental aspects of human language. For these reasons, the language taught to apes tends (...)
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  • Telling the Tree: Narrative Representation and the Study of Evolutionary History.Robert J. O' Hara - 1992 - Biology and Philosophy 7 (2):135.
    Accounts of the evolutionary past have as much in common with works of narrative history as they do with works of science. Awareness of the narrative character of evolutionary writing leads to the discovery of a host of fascinating and hitherto unrecognized problems in the representation of evolutionary history, problems associated with the writing of narrative. These problems include selective attention, narrative perspective, foregrounding and backgrounding, differential resolution, and the establishment of a canon of important events. The narrative aspects of (...)
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  • Humans and Other Animals.John Dupré - 2009 - Critica 41 (123):170-176.
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  • Bohr’s Complementarity Framework in Biosemiotics.Filip Grygar - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (1):33-55.
    This paper analyses Bohr’s complementarity framework and applies it to biosemiotic studies by illustrating its application to three existing models of living systems: mechanistic biology, Barbieri’s version of biosemiotics in terms of his code biology and Markoš’s phenomenological version of hermeneutic biosemiotics. The contribution summarizes both Bohr’s philosophy of science crowned by his idea of complementarity and his conception of the phenomenon of the living. Bohr’s approach to the biological questions evolved – among other things – from the consequences of (...)
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  • Human Nature and the Limits of Science.John Dupré - 2004 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 194 (1):134-135.
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  • Mental Evolution in Animals.G. J. Romanes - 1884 - Mind 9:473.
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  • Die Stellung des Menschen im Kosmos.Max Scheler - 1928 - Annalen der Philosophie Und Philosophischen Kritik 7:169-170.
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  • Biologische Fragmente zu einer Lehre vom Menschen.Adolf Portmann - 1947 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 1 (4):608-616.
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  • Shared Intentionality and the Origins of Human Communication.Hans Bernhard Schmid - 2013 - In Salice Alessandro (ed.), Intentionality. Philosophia-Verlag.
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