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  1. Timaean Particulars.Allan Silverman - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (1):87-113.
    At 47e–53c of the Timaeus Plato presents his most detailed metaphysical analysis of particulars. We are told about the construction of the physical universe, the ways we can and cannot talk about the phenomena produced, and about the two causes – Necessity and Intelligence – which govern the processes and results of production. It seems to me that we are told too much and too little: too much, because we have two accounts of the generation of phenomenal particulars – one, (...)
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  • Timaean Particulars.Allan Silverman - 1992 - Classical Quarterly 42 (01):87-.
    At 47e–53c of the Timaeus Plato presents his most detailed metaphysical analysis of particulars. We are told about the construction of the physical universe, the ways we can and cannot talk about the phenomena produced, and about the two causes – Necessity and Intelligence – which govern the processes and results of production. It seems to me that we are told too much and too little: too much, because we have two accounts of the generation of phenomenal particulars – one, (...)
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  • Ancient Automata and Mechanical Explanation.Sylvia Berryman - 2003 - Phronesis 48 (4):344 - 369.
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  • Plato on Necessity and Chaos.Andrew S. Mason - 2006 - Philosophical Studies 127 (2):283-298.
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  • Matter and Flux in Plato's Timaeus.Mary Louise Gill - 1987 - Phronesis 32 (1):34-53.
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  • Plato's Vision of Chaos.Jerry S. Clegg - 1976 - Classical Quarterly 26 (01):52-.
    In the creation myth of the Timaeus Plato describes God as wishing that all things should be good so far as is possible. Wherefore, finding the whole visible sphere of the world not at rest, but moving in an irregular fashion, out of disorder He brought order, thinking that this was in every way an improvement. To achieve His end He placed intelligence in soul and soul in body, reflecting that nothing unintelligent could ever be better than something intelligent . (...)
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