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  1. Teaching and Truthfulness.David E. Cooper - 2008 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 27 (2-3):79-87.
    Some tendencies in modern education—the stress on ‘performativity’, for instance, and ‘celebration of difference’—threaten the value traditionally placed on truthful teaching. In this paper, truthfulness is mainly understood, following Bernard Williams, as a disposition to ‘Accuracy’ and ‘Sincerity’—hence as a virtue. It is to be distinguished from truth, and current debates about the nature of truth are not relevant to the issue of the value of truthfulness. This issue devolves into the question of whether truthfulness is a distinctive virtue of (...)
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  • Epistemic Vices in Public Debate: The Case of New Atheism.Ian James Kidd - 2017 - In Christopher Cotter & Philip Quadrio (eds.), New Atheism's Legacy: Critical Perspectives From Philosophy and the Social Sciences. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 51-68..
    Although critics often argue that the new atheists are arrogant, dogmatic, closed-minded and so on, there is currently no philosophical analysis of this complaint - which I will call 'the vice charge' - and no assessment of whether it is merely a rhetorical aside or a substantive objection in its own right. This Chapter therefore uses the resources of virtue epistemology to articulate this ' vice charge' and to argue that critics are right to imply that new atheism is intrinsically (...)
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  • Truthfulness and 'Inclusion'in Archaeology.David E. Cooper - 2006 - In Chris Scarre & Geoffrey Scarre (eds.), The Ethics of Archaeology: Philosophical Perspectives on Archaeological Practice. Cambridge University Press. pp. 131--145.
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  • ‘An Influential Set of Chaps’: The X-Club and Royal Society Politics 1864–85.Ruth Barton - 1990 - British Journal for the History of Science 23 (1):53-81.
    ‘Our’ included not only Hooker and Huxley but their fellow-members of the X-Club. ‘Our time’ had been the 1870s and early 1880s. For a five-year period from November 1873 to November 1878 Hooker had been President of the Society, Huxley one of the Secretaries, and fellow X-Club member, William Spottiswoode, the Treasurer. Hooker was followed in the Presidency by Spottiswoode, and on Spottiswoode's death in 1883 Huxley was elected President. During this period other X-Club members—Edward Frankland, John Tyndall, George Busk, (...)
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  • Invisible Resource: William Crookes and His Circle of Support, 1871–81.Hannah Gay - 1996 - British Journal for the History of Science 29 (3):311-336.
    In a 1976 paper, Robert DeKosky wrote ‘William Crookes is a puzzle to historians of latenineteenth century science. Despite his achievements we are forced to ask why he did not accomplish more.’ It is an interesting question; equally interesting is the question that prompts this paper – how did he accomplish so much?Why some scientists become prolific and successful is a question with both historical and ahistorical dimensions. Among the former are a number of cultural aspects rarely studied by historians. (...)
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  • The Language of Natural Power: The Eloges of Georges Cuvier and the Public Language of Nineteenth Century Science.Dorinda Outram - 1978 - History of Science 16 (3):153-178.
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  • "Huxley, Lubbock, And Half A Dozen Others": Professionals And Gentlemen In The Formation Of The X Club, 1851-1864.Ruth Barton - 1998 - Isis 89:410-444.
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