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  1. Two Treatises of Government. [REVIEW]H. A. L. - 1948 - Journal of Philosophy 45 (10):272.
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  • Two treatises of government.John Locke - 1947 - New York: Cambridge University Press. Edited by Peter Laslett.
    This is a new revised version of Dr. Laslett's standard edition of Two Treatises. First published in 1960, and based on an analysis of the whole body of Locke's publications, writings, and papers. The Introduction and text have been revised to incorporate references to recent scholarship since the second edition and the bibliography has been updated.
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  • Self-Ownership, Freedom and Equality.Eric Mack - 1995 - Philosophy 72 (281):478-482.
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  • Review of G. A. Cohen: Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality[REVIEW]Eric Mack - 1997 - Ethics 107 (3):517-520.
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  • Anarchy, State, and Utopia.Robert Nozick - 1974 - Philosophy 52 (199):102-105.
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  • Anarchy, State, and Utopia.Robert Nozick - 1974 - New York: Basic Books.
    Winner of the 1975 National Book Award, this brilliant and widely acclaimed book is a powerful philosophical challenge to the most widely held political and social positions of our age--liberal, socialist, and conservative.
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  • Self-Ownership, Freedom, and Equality.Gerald Allan Cohen - 1995 - Cambridge University Press.
    In this book G. A. Cohen examines the libertarian principle of self-ownership, which says that each person belongs to himself and therefore owes no service or product to anyone else. This principle is used to defend capitalist inequality, which is said to reflect each person's freedom to do as as he wishes with himself. The author argues that self-ownership cannot deliver the freedom it promises to secure, thereby undermining the idea that lovers of freedom should embrace capitalism and the inequality (...)
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  • Nozick’s Libertarian Theory of Justice.Peter Vallentyne - 2011 - In Ralf Bader & John Meadowcroft (eds.), Anarchy, State, and Utopia--A Reappraisal. Cambridge University Press.
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  • Lockean justifications of intellectual property.Daniel Attas - 2008 - In Gosseries Axel, Marciano A. & Strowel A. (eds.), Intellectual Property and Theories of Justice. Basingstoke & N.Y.: Palgrave Mcmillan. pp. 29--56.
    This paper explores the possibility of extending Locke’s theory with respect to tangible property so that it might offer a feasible theoretical basis for intellectual property too. The main conclusion is that such an attempt must fail. Locke’s theory comes in three parts: a general justification of property which serves to explain why assets ought to be under the exclusive control of individuals; a positive method of private appropriation whereby an individual acquires a prima facie exclusive claim to previously commonly (...)
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  • Justifying intellectual property.Edwin C. Hettinger - 1989 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 18 (1):31-52.
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