Switch to: Citations

Add references

You must login to add references.
  1. Intention.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1957 - Harvard University Press.
    This is a welcome reprint of a book that continues to grow in importance.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   816 citations  
  • .R. Edgley & R. Osborne (eds.) - 1985 - Verso.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   40 citations  
  • Reason in Theory and Practice.Roy Edgley - 1969 - London: Hutchinson.
    This text maps the network of concepts that constitute the general catagory of reason. In the process it shows that some famous philosophical doctrines are based on mistaken assumptions in this conceptual area. In particular, it aims to undermine the arguments of Hume and is modern followers to the effect that reason can be theoretical but not practical (can govern thought but not action) and that value judgements cannot be validly inferred from facts.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   44 citations  
  • Causality: Models, Reasoning and Inference.Judea Pearl - 2000 - Cambridge University Press.
    Causality offers the first comprehensive coverage of causal analysis in many sciences, including recent advances using graphical methods. Pearl presents a unified account of the probabilistic, manipulative, counterfactual and structural approaches to causation, and devises simple mathematical tools for analyzing the relationships between causal connections, statistical associations, actions and observations. The book will open the way for including causal analysis in the standard curriculum of statistics, artificial intelligence, business, epidemiology, social science and economics.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   649 citations  
  • Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge.Richard Moran - 2001 - Princeton University Press.
    Since Socrates, and through Descartes to the present day, the problems of self-knowledge have been central to philosophy's understanding of itself. Today the idea of ''first-person authority''--the claim of a distinctive relation each person has toward his or her own mental life--has been challenged from a number of directions, to the point where many doubt the person bears any distinctive relation to his or her own mental life, let alone a privileged one. In Authority and Estrangement, Richard Moran argues for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   452 citations  
  • Where Luce and Krantz do really generalize Savage's decision model.Wolfgang Spohn - 1977 - Erkenntnis 11 (1):113 - 134.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   54 citations  
  • Reversing 30 years of discussion: why causal decision theorists should one-box.Wolfgang Spohn - 2012 - Synthese 187 (1):95-122.
    The paper will show how one may rationalize one-boxing in Newcomb's problem and drinking the toxin in the Toxin puzzle within the confines of causal decision theory by ascending to so-called reflexive decision models which reflect how actions are caused by decision situations (beliefs, desires, and intentions) represented by ordinary unreflexive decision models.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The Dynamics of Rational Deliberation.Richard Jeffrey - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (3):734-737.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Does practical deliberation crowd out self-prediction?Wlodek Rabinowicz - 2002 - Erkenntnis 57 (1):91-122.
    It is a popular view thatpractical deliberation excludes foreknowledge of one's choice. Wolfgang Spohn and Isaac Levi have argued that not even a purely probabilistic self-predictionis available to thedeliberator, if one takes subjective probabilities to be conceptually linked to betting rates. It makes no sense to have a betting rate for an option, for one's willingness to bet on the option depends on the net gain from the bet, in combination with the option's antecedent utility, rather than on the offered (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   39 citations  
  • Conditional credence.Huw Price - 1986 - Mind 95 (377):18-36.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Agency and probabilistic causality.Huw Price - 1991 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (2):157-176.
    Probabilistic accounts of causality have long had trouble with ‘spurious’ evidential correlations. Such correlations are also central to the case for causal decision theory—the argument that evidential decision theory is inadequate to cope with certain sorts of decision problem. However, there are now several strong defences of the evidential theory. Here I present what I regard as the best defence, and apply it to the probabilistic approach to causality. I argue that provided a probabilistic theory appeals to the notions of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   69 citations  
  • Against causal decision theory.Huw Price - 1986 - Synthese 67 (2):195 - 212.
    Proponents of causal decision theories argue that classical Bayesian decision theory (BDT) gives the wrong advice in certain types of cases, of which the clearest and commonest are the medical Newcomb problems. I defend BDT, invoking a familiar principle of statistical inference to show that in such cases a free agent cannot take the contemplated action to be probabilistically relevant to its causes (so that BDT gives the right answer). I argue that my defence does better than those of Ellery (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   37 citations  
  • Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge.Richard Moran - 2004 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 69 (2):448-454.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   256 citations  
  • Authority and Estrangement: An Essay on Self-Knowledge.Richard Moran - 2001 - Princeton University Press.
    Since Socrates, and through Descartes to the present day, the problems of self-knowledge have been central to philosophy's understanding of itself. Today the idea of ''first-person authority''--the claim of a distinctive relation each person has toward his or her own mental life--has been challenged from a number of directions, to the point where many doubt the person bears any distinctive relation to his or her own mental life, let alone a privileged one. In Authority and Estrangement, Richard Moran argues for (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   278 citations  
  • How to Believe a Conditional.D. H. Mellor - 1993 - Journal of Philosophy 90 (5):233-248.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   31 citations  
  • Heart of DARCness.Yang Liu & Huw Price - 2019 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 97 (1):136-150.
    There is a long-standing disagreement in the philosophy of probability and Bayesian decision theory about whether an agent can hold a meaningful credence about an upcoming action, while she deliberates about what to do. Can she believe that it is, say, 70% probable that she will do A, while she chooses whether to do A? No, say some philosophers, for Deliberation Crowds Out Prediction (DCOP), but others disagree. In this paper, we propose a valid core for DCOP, and identify terminological (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Foundations of Causal Decision Theory.Isaac Levi & James M. Joyce - 2000 - Journal of Philosophy 97 (7):387.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   169 citations  
  • Rationality, prediction, and autonomous choice.Isaac Levi - 1993 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 23 (sup1):339-363.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   17 citations  
  • Regret and instability in causal decision theory.James M. Joyce - 2012 - Synthese 187 (1):123-145.
    Andy Egan has recently produced a set of alleged counterexamples to causal decision theory in which agents are forced to decide among causally unratifiable options, thereby making choices they know they will regret. I show that, far from being counterexamples, CDT gets Egan's cases exactly right. Egan thinks otherwise because he has misapplied CDT by requiring agents to make binding choices before they have processed all available information about the causal consequences of their acts. I elucidate CDT in a way (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   45 citations  
  • Levi on causal decision theory and the possibility of predicting one's own actions.James M. Joyce - 2002 - Philosophical Studies 110 (1):69 - 102.
    Isaac Levi has long criticized causal decisiontheory on the grounds that it requiresdeliberating agents to make predictions abouttheir own actions. A rational agent cannot, heclaims, see herself as free to choose an actwhile simultaneously making a prediction abouther likelihood of performing it. Levi is wrongon both points. First, nothing in causaldecision theory forces agents to makepredictions about their own acts. Second,Levi's arguments for the ``deliberation crowdsout prediction thesis'' rely on a flawed modelof the measurement of belief. Moreover, theability of agents (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   33 citations  
  • Are Newcomb problems really decisions?James M. Joyce - 2006 - Synthese 156 (3):537-562.
    Richard Jeffrey long held that decision theory should be formulated without recourse to explicitly causal notions. Newcomb problems stand out as putative counterexamples to this ‘evidential’ decision theory. Jeffrey initially sought to defuse Newcomb problems via recourse to the doctrine of ratificationism, but later came to see this as problematic. We will see that Jeffrey’s worries about ratificationism were not compelling, but that valid ratificationist arguments implicitly presuppose causal decision theory. In later work, Jeffrey argued that Newcomb problems are not (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Direction of fit.I. Lloyd Humberstone - 1992 - Mind 101 (401):59-83.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   124 citations  
  • What conditional probability could not be.Alan Hájek - 2003 - Synthese 137 (3):273--323.
    Kolmogorov''s axiomatization of probability includes the familiarratio formula for conditional probability: 0).$$ " align="middle" border="0">.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   281 citations  
  • Deliberation welcomes prediction.Alan Hájek - 2016 - Episteme 13 (4):507-528.
    According to the so-called ‘deliberation crowds out prediction’ thesis, while deliberating about what you’ll do, you cannot rationally have credences for what you’ll do – you cannot rationally have option-credences. Versions of the thesis have been defended by authors such as Spohn, Levi, Gilboa, Price, Louise, and others. After registering a number of concerns about the thesis, I rehearse and rebut many of the main arguments for it, grouped according to their main themes: agency, vacuity, betting, and decision-theoretical considerations. I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   12 citations  
  • Causal decision theory and decision-theoretic causation.Christopher Hitchcock - 1996 - Noûs 30 (4):508-526.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Causality: Models, Reasoning and Inference.Christopher Hitchcock & Judea Pearl - 2001 - Philosophical Review 110 (4):639.
    Judea Pearl has been at the forefront of research in the burgeoning field of causal modeling, and Causality is the culmination of his work over the last dozen or so years. For philosophers of science with a serious interest in causal modeling, Causality is simply mandatory reading. Chapter 2, in particular, addresses many of the issues familiar from works such as Causation, Prediction and Search by Peter Spirtes, Clark Glymour, and Richard Scheines. But philosophers with a more general interest in (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   363 citations  
  • Intention.P. L. Heath - 1960 - Philosophical Quarterly 10 (40):281.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   417 citations  
  • Self-reference and the acyclicity of rational choice.Haim Gaifman - 1999 - Annals of Pure and Applied Logic 96 (1-3):117-140.
    Self-reference in semantics, which leads to well-known paradoxes, is a thoroughly researched subject. The phenomenon can appear also in decision theoretic situations. There is a structural analogy between the two and, more interestingly, an analogy between principles concerning truth and those concerning rationality. The former can serve as a guide for clarifying the latter. Both the analogies and the disanalogies are illuminating.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • A Simpler and More Realistic Subjective Decision Theory.Haim Gaifman & Yang Liu - 2018 - Synthese 195 (10):4205--4241.
    In his classic book “the Foundations of Statistics” Savage developed a formal system of rational decision making. The system is based on (i) a set of possible states of the world, (ii) a set of consequences, (iii) a set of acts, which are functions from states to consequences, and (iv) a preference relation over the acts, which represents the preferences of an idealized rational agent. The goal and the culmination of the enterprise is a representation theorem: Any preference relation that (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Reason in Theory and Practice.A. D. Woozley - 1971 - Philosophical Quarterly 21 (82):86-87.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Reason in Theory and Practice.David Pole - 1970 - Philosophy 45 (174):333-337.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • General Propositions and Causality.Frank Plumpton Ramsey - 1929 - In The Foundations of Mathematics and other Logical Essays. Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner. pp. 237-255.
    This article rebuts Ramsey's earlier theory, in 'Universals of Law and of Fact', of how laws of nature differ from other true generalisations. It argues that our laws are rules we use in judging 'if I meet an F I shall regard it as a G'. This temporal asymmetry is derived from that of cause and effect and used to distinguish what's past as what we can know about without knowing our present intentions.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   215 citations  
  • Causality: Models, Reasoning and Inference.Judea Pearl - 2000 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 64 (1):201-202.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   730 citations  
  • Evidence, Decision and Causality.Arif Ahmed - 2014 - United Kingdom: Cambridge University Press.
    Most philosophers agree that causal knowledge is essential to decision-making: agents should choose from the available options those that probably cause the outcomes that they want. This book argues against this theory and in favour of evidential or Bayesian decision theory, which emphasises the symptomatic value of options over their causal role. It examines a variety of settings, including economic theory, quantum mechanics and philosophical thought-experiments, where causal knowledge seems to make a practical difference. The arguments make novel use of (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • Truth and probability.Frank Ramsey - 1926 - In Antony Eagle (ed.), Philosophy of Probability: Contemporary Readings. Routledge. pp. 52-94.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   544 citations  
  • The Dynamics of Rational Deliberation.Brian Skyrms - 1990 - Harvard University Press.
    Brian Skyrms constructs a theory of "dynamic deliberation" and uses it to investigate rational decision-making in cases of strategic interaction. This illuminating book will be of great interest to all those in many disciplines who use decision theory and game theory to study human behavior and thought. Skyrms begins by discussing the Bayesian theory of individual rational decision and the classical theory of games, which at first glance seem antithetical in the criteria used for determining action. In his effort to (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   125 citations  
  • Formal Logic, or the Calculus of Inference, Necessary and Probable.Augustus de Morgan - 1847 - London, England: Taylor & Walton.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • Intention. --.Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe - 1957 - Blackwell.
    Intention is one of the masterworks of twentieth-century philosophy in English. First published in 1957, it has acquired the status of a modern philosophical classic. The book attempts to show in detail that the natural and widely accepted picture of what we mean by an intention gives rise to insoluble problems and must be abandoned. This is a welcome reprint of a book that continues to grow in importance.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   292 citations  
  • Epistemic freedom.J. David Velleman - 1989 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 70 (1):73-97.
    Epistemic freedom is the freedom to affirm anyone of several incompatible propositions without risk of being wrong. We sometimes have this freedom, strange as it seems, and our having it sheds some light on the topic of free will and determinism. This paper sketches a potential explanation for our feeling of freedom. The freedom that I postulate is not causal but epistemic (in a sense that I shall define), and the result is that it is quite compatible with determinism. I (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   34 citations  
  • The Direction of Causation: Ramsey's Ultimate Contingency.Huw Price - 1992 - PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1992:253 - 267.
    The paper criticizes the attempt to account for the direction of causation in terms of objective statistical asymmetries, such as those of the fork asymmetry. Following Ramsey, I argue that the most plausible way to account for causal asymmetry is to regard it as "put in by hand", that is as a feature that agents project onto the world. Its temporal orientation stems from that of ourselves as agents. The crucial statistical asymmetry is an anthropocentric one, namely that we take (...)
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Intention.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1957 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 57:321-332.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   736 citations  
  • A Propos D'un Traité De Probabilités.É Borel - 1924 - Revue Philosophique de la France Et de l'Etranger 98:321.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Dynamics of Rational Deliberation.Brian Skyrm - 1994 - Behavior and Philosophy 22 (1):67-70.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   75 citations  
  • A propos d'un Traité de Probabilités.Emile Borel - 1924 - Revue Philosophique 98:321-336.
    Download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations