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  1. Theory and Evidence.Paul Horwich - 1982 - Journal of Philosophy 79 (12):775-781.
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  • Dutch-Book Arguments Depragmatized: Epistemic Consistency for Partial Believers.David Christensen - 1996 - Journal of Philosophy 93 (9):450-479.
    The most immediately appealing model for formal constraints on degrees of belief is provided by probability theory, which tells us, for instance, that the probability of P can never be greater than that of (P v Q). But while this model has much intuitive appeal, many have been concerned to provide arguments showing that ideally rational degrees of belief would conform to the calculus of probabilities. The arguments most frequently used to make this claim plausible are the so-called "Dutch Book" (...)
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  • Subjective Probability: Criticisms, Reflections, and Problems. [REVIEW]H. Kyburg - 1978 - Journal of Philosophical Logic 7 (1):157 - 180.
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  • Truth and Probability.F. Ramsey - 1926 - In Antony Eagle (ed.), Philosophy of Probability: Contemporary Readings. Routledge. pp. 52-94.
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  • Theory and Evidence.Clark Glymour - 1980 - Philosophy of Science 48 (3):498-500.
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  • Scotching Dutch Books?Alan Hajek - 2005 - Philosophical Perspectives 19 (1):139-151.
    The Dutch Book argument, like Route 66, is about to turn 80. It is arguably the most celebrated argument for subjective Bayesianism. Start by rejecting the Cartesian idea that doxastic attitudes are ‘all-or-nothing’; rather, they are far more nuanced degrees of belief, for short credences, susceptible to fine-grained numerical measurement. Add a coherentist assumption that the rationality of a doxastic state consists in its internal consistency. The remaining problem is to determine what consistency of credences amounts to. The Dutch Book (...)
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  • Decisions Without Ordering.Teddy Seidenfeld, Mark J. Schervish & Joseph B. Kadane - unknown
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